Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats



Novel 





Herald 


ONAL 






m 


(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris. Wednesday, December 21, 1994 


Buoyant 9 95 
Is Forecast 
For Richest 
Economies 

By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tnbtme 

J^TZ^J**** 25 ricbesl naUons 

^J°°^ i£T vard i to a buoyant and pros- 
perous 1995. with economic growth im- 
proving from 2.8 percent this year to a 
solid 3 percent and inflation not a problem 
nexL year since it should average about 2.3 
percent, according to an authoritative re- 
port issued on Tuesday. 

The main item marring this otherwise 
rosy forecast, issued Tuesday by the Oiga- 
ujzation for Economic Cooperation and 
Development here, was a reminder that 
economic growth on its own will not solve 
Europe’s persisting jobs crisis. 

The average unemployment rate among 
-uropean OECD members is forecast to 
decline only slightly, from 1 1 .6 percent this 
year to 11.3 percent in 1995. By 1996, 
unemployment among European member 
nations will still be 10.9 percent, the 
OECD said. 

France, with a 12.6 percent jobless rate 
today, will continue to have the highest 
unemployment rate of any OECD country 
— 12.3 percent in 1995 and 11.7 percent in 
1996. 

In general terms, the semiannual report 
left no doubt that “economic prospects for 
the OECD area are at present better than 
they have been for several years.” 

It added that recovery had “spread to all 
major regions.” 

But, echoing the warnings of manv busi- 
ness leaders and economists, the OECD 
also stressed that the global recovery 
should be seen as “a golden opportunity” 
for governments to carry out politically 
unpopular structural reforms, such as cut- 
ting fiscal deficits by rolling back the wel- 
fare state and deregulating labor markets. 

The report also urged that central banks 
keep potential inflation at bay by way of a 
“prudent management of monetary poli- 
cy,” which is a polite way of saying that 
interest rates should be raised where eco- 
nomic growth seems in danger of fueling 
inflation. 

These were among the other highlights 
of the 127-page report: 

• Growth in the United States will slow 
from 3.9 percent this year to 3.1 percent in 
1995 and 2.0 percent in 1996, but the 
United States will probably avoid reces- 
sion. Since the UJS. economy is now run- 
ning at nearly full capacity, the Federal 
Reserve should not hesitate to raise inter- 
est rates if needed to staunch inflation. 

This view comes amid increasing con- 
cern among some economists and govern- 
ment officials that the Fed could go be- 
yond cooling the economy and trigger a 
mild recession by 1996 if it raises interest 
rates too much. The Fed's policy-making 
Open Market Committee met Tuesday for 
its final interest rate review of 1994, but 
did not announce any changes. (Page 10) 

• The Japanese economy, still experi- 
encing only a weak recovery and 1994 
sjowth of just 1 percent, will achieve 2.5 
percent in 1995 and 3.4 percent in 1996. 
Tokyo's current account will rise from 
S140 billion this year to $145 billion in 
1995. 

• Germany, the most important econo- 

my in Europe, will experience a “robust” 
recovery in its western regions and an 
“increasingly broad-based” improvement 
in its eastern states. Inflation is expected to 
decline from 2.3 percent in 1994 to 2.0 
percent next year and then rise to 22 
percent in 1996. .... 

• France will enjoy growth of more than 
3 percent in 1995 and 1996, but its budget 

See FORECAST, Page 6 


X 

-l.' • *5?- ■*,. 


M 

' #i 

wf , ■ 


B it 

. B 



’OJAfO'V-..* 





The AmxUted Pirav Cornu TV 

SHOOTING NEAR WHITE HOUSE — A videotape showing policemen before they shot a man who reportedly brandished a knife on Tuesday. Page 3. 

Yielding , Intel to Replace Flawed Pentium Chip 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Trying to recover from a marketing 
miscalculation, Intel Corp. yielded to public pressure 
Tuesday and began offering free replacements for the 
flawed Pentium microprocessor that serves as the brains 
for the latest personal computer models produced world- 
wide. 

Errors made by the Pentium in rarely used long- 
division problems were discovered last July by engineers 
for the world's largest chipmaker, but, as a spokesman 
ruefully admitted Tuesday, they were not publicized 
“because we didn't believe it was an issue then, and we 
still don’t believe it's an issue for most users.” 


In a coincidental demonstration of the the problems 
facing high-technology manufacturers in consumer mar- 
kets, Microsoft Coro, announced Tuesday a delay until 
at least August for snipping its new Windows 95 operat- 
ing software, which is just as essential as the Pentium 
chip in increasing the speed and sophistication of person- 
al computers. (Page 9) 

Jerry Michaelski. manag in g editor of the computer 
magazine Release 1.0, has dubbed it “Windows 96” 
because be suspects Microsoft will not have the bugs out 
of it until 1996. 

On Wall Street, the two announcements have shaken 
up the entire technology sector. Microsoft stock fell 
S2.75, to $59,875, because investors -had counted on 


revenues from the new program. But Intel stock rose 
$3.44, to $61.25, because the company was seen as finally 
confronting its problems even though the cost of replace- 
ment chips will cut earnings; the stock had slipped as low 
as $58,625 on Thursday. 

Intel had resisted requests to replace the flawed Pen- 
tium with an improved version until a mathematician at 
a small Virginia college discovered mistakes in his own 
arcane calculations of prime numbers last month and 
later verified them by publicly checking with colleagues 
on the computer Internet. Even then the company initial- 
ly said that it would only offer new chips to such users as 

See CHIPS, Page 6 


Berlusconi Nearing the Brink 
Of a Parliamentary Showdown 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Timet Service 

ROME — Prime Minister Silvio Ber- 
lusconi is approaching a final show- 
down with his adversaries that will de- 
termine — possibly Wednesday and 
certainly within days — ■ whether he 
clings to power. 

The climax of Mr. Berlusconi's battle 
against open revolt by his Northern 
League coalition partner will begin 
when he addresses Parliament on 
Wednesday. Thereafter, the timing of 
events is as uncertain as the nation's 
future. 

A senior Berlusconi aide, Giuliano 
Ferrara, forecast a confidence vote after 
the prime minister’s speech on Thurs- 
day or Friday, but Deputy Prime Minis- 
ter Giuseppe Tatardla, a member of the 
neo-Faso st National Alliance, which 


supports Mr. Berlusconi, said the gov- 
ernment would quit earlier. 

“The government will resign tomor- 
row,” be said ou television on Tuesday 
evening. 

Mr. Ferrara, the government spokes- 
man, said it was “highly probable” that 
Mr. Berlusconi would seek on Wednes- 
day to preempt three no-confidence 
motions presented to Parliament by his 
adversaries and, instead, demand a vote 
of confidence in his government. 

“If the confidence motion fails, the 
government will obviously resign,” said 
Mr. Ferrara, who holds ministerial rank 
in the Berlusconi government. From the 
way Mr. Berlusconi and his aides are 
talking, it is as if they view their rear- 
guard action this week as much as the 

See ITALY, Page til 



Cease-Fire Plan Is in Place, Carter Says 


New York 71 met Sendee 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia- Herzegovina — * 
Former President Jimmy Carter an- 
nounced an agreement Tuesday between 
ihe warring parties in Bosnia to begin a 
nationwide cease-fire on Friday and stop 
fighting for at least four months. 

He also brought the Muslim-led Bosni- 
an government and the Bosnian Serbs clos- 
er than they have been for six months to 
sitting down again at a table and trymgto 

Srfover the bass for lie* tafe, it 
appeared that they might begin early next 
year. 

But the durability of the cease-fire, the 


? KB | 1 £85 1 
— sss m 

TffiM 1&05 

p ~ ,nd 1 ' — 

=rr 100. T7 100.115 

Yen ■ c 

FF 5*14 5.421 


Newsstand Pric es — — 

— . ~2 onoFF Luxembourg 60 L Fr 
Andorra-— • Morocco, ,,,,...72 Dh 

Antit fc’ijmCFA q£w.T;...B.OO Rials 
R6unlon..,.11J0FF 
E9YPt-~— » gg pp Saudi Arabic -9.00 [R- 

France...— A*® genesa! 960 C FA 

GO*"- 9 S 0 C d£ sSSr.-^»PTAS 

Greece Tunisia ...J.OOODin 

Italy -f.^cFA Turkey ..T.L. 35,000 

ivorv Coast g u.A.E J^ODIrh 

U.S. MU. (Bur.) 81.10' 


latest of move than 30 to be announced 
since the warbegpmin 1992, and the even- 
tual success of the peace negotiations re- 
mained open to question in that none of 
the deep differences between Muslims and 
Serbs mat caused the war have been re- 
solved. 

These differences center on whether 
Bosnia should remain a single state or be 
dismembered and what territory each side 
should get 

After three days of hectic shuttle diplo- 
macy between Sarajevo and the nearby 
B osnian Serbian stronghold of Pale, Mr. 
Carter read a statement saying there was 
an accord on the “implementation of a 
nationwide cease-fire within 72 hours, in- 
cluding monitoring by United Nations 


Kiosk 

Germany Willing 
To Aid a Pullout 


forces along all lines of confrontation.” 

He said that negotiations would begin 
Friday to build the cease-fire into a “total 
cessation of hostilities” that would last for 
four months “or for a longer period if 
mutually agreed by both parties.” The ne- 
gotiations are due to end by Jan. 1. 

“We have an agreement from both par- 
ties on a four-month cease-fire,” he said. 

The essential difference between a 
cease-fire and a cessation of hostilities is 
thm troops would pull back some distance 
from the current front lines and allow 
United Nations troops to be put between 
them where necessary. How this is done 
will be discussed by generals from the rival 

See BOSNIA, Page 2 






' • ■■ y.y 

. ! -f4' 










Scnpd Teurln/Keutcn 

A Grozny resident salvaging a pot from her home, ruined in bombing Tuesday. 


Deep in China, a Salute to U.S. General 


abroad, : 
portNA 


Iged on Tuesday to sup- 
if United Nations peace- 


part NATO if United Nations peace- 
keepers have to quit Bosnia. 

Government officials said Chancel- 
lor Hdmut Kohl’s cabinet had agreed 
to offer Tornado fighter-bombers, lo 


UJ Uliu . imiulUU iv 

gistical support and medical person- 
nel, if Parliament approves. 


Book Review 


Page R 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

New York Times Service 

CHONGQING, China — General Joseph W. Stflwdl, com- 
mander of U.S. forces in the China-Bunnarlndia theater during 
World War II, has made a return of sorts to this wartime capital. . 

C ommunis t Party authorities in this city, formerly Chung- 
king, have evicted the workers of a small factory that makes steel 
rims for motorcycle wheels to set up a museum to the American 
officer who struggled from 1942 to 1944 to get Generalissimo 
Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalist army to fight the Japanese, not 
the Chinese Communists. 

“He detested the corrupt and incompetent government of old 
China and hated the Kuomintang for fighting the Commu- 
nists,” the exhibition declares. 

The Kuomintang, or Nationalist Party, was the political 
foundation of Generalissimo Chiang's war effort, but its battle- . 
field inertia and prodigious corruption were sources of constant 
exasperation in General Stflwdrs headquarters, a stone house . 
set on a cliff overlooking the JIaling River. 


“The crux of it,” General Stflwdl once wrote, was that “they 
just don’t want to get ready to fight” 

He was formally chief of staff to thegeneralissimo. But today, 
the Communist Party authorities in Chongtnng and in Beijing 
have embraced General Stflwdl as an intellectual and soldier 
with a strong affection for the Chinesepeople who was willing to 
open a dialogue with Mao Zedong’s Communists if that would 


help win the war. 

Though the museum was formally opened in October during 
the visit by Defense Secretary William J. Perry, there appear to 
have been few if any Chinese visitors. Indeed, the museum has 
no hours of operation, and the door remains locked except when 
Americans or other foreigners arrange with municipal officials 
to open it. 

' Finding the remnants of the once-extensive American pres- 
ence here requires a diligent search, for the city is a maze of 
winding roads on a rocky promontory at the confluence of the 

See MUSEUM, Page 6 


No. 34.777 

Refugees Flee 
Rebel Capital 
As Russians 
Step Up Raids 

Chechen Leader Shotas 
No Sign of Wavering 
Despite ‘Mass Killing 9 

By Margaret Shapiro 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — Russian troops stepped 
up the pressure Tuesday on the breakaway 
Chechen Republic, with bombing raids on 
the capital, Grozny, and ground assaults 
on its outskirts that left key buildings 
aflame, many people killed and injured 
and sent thousands of refugees pouring 
from the city. 

The Russian assault was the most inten- 
sive one yet and appeared to be pan of an 
effort to tighten a noose around Grozny 
without having troops try to enter it, a 
move that many warn would provoke a 
bloody street-by-street battle. 

Russian officials asserted Tuesday that 
Grozny, where the Chechen leader Dzho- 
kar Dudayev and his armed supporters 
have dug in, was a “city in panic/* with 
many Chechen fighters fleeing to take up 
positions in nearby hills. The Russians 
promised a continuation of “decisive of- 
fensive actions." 

Mr. Dudayev accused the Russians of 
“mass killing of peaceful citizens — chil- 
dren, women ana old people,” according 
to the official Russian press agency, Itar- 
Tass. 

Mr. Dudayev, a former Soviet Air Force 
general, showed no signs of wavering in his 
determination to fight to the end against a 
Russian assault. 

Nikolai D. Yegorov, President Boris N. 
Yeltsin’s coordinator for the Chechen cri- 
sis, predicted Tuesday that Russian troops 
would surround Grozny during the day. 

Russian officials have predicted Groz- 
ny’s immin ent encirclement and isolation 
for a week now. But a combination of raw 
and foggy weather, opposition to the Che- 
chen operation by some Russian troops 
and stiff resistance by unarmed civilians 
have repeatedly proved the predictions 
false and could do so again. 

Indeed, the Russian onslaught was not 
without its problems Tuesday. Chechen 
fighters, armed with machine guns and 
rocket launchers, shot down a Russian 
helicopter during heavy fighting around 
the village of Petropavlovskaya, about 20 
kilometers (12 miles) northeast of Grozny. 
The three soldiers on board were killed, the 
Interfax news agency reported. 

The agency also reported that, despite 
government assertions that Russian 
ground forces were advancing on Grozny 
from all directions, tank columns in the 
east and. west had not changed their posi- 
tions. 

[Russia said it was dosing its borders 
with Georgia and Azerbaijan to prevent 
the movement of rebel fighters in Chech- 
nya, Reuters reported. A Foreign Ministry 
statement earned by Itar-Tass said that, 
starting at midnight Tuesday, only resi- 
dents of Russia who were returning home 
would be allowed to cross land borders 
with the two former Soviet republics, and 
that movement of goods or other people 
would be halted indefinitely.] 

Russia opened its mflitaxy assault on 
Chechnya on Dec II to bring the rebel- 
lious, mostly Muslim republic back into 
the fold. As many as 40,000 Russian 
troops, backed by tanks and lighter planes, 
have been mustered for the assault on 

See RUSSIA, Page 6 

The Kremlin’s 
No-Win Battle 
Over Chechnya 

By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — President Boris N. Yelt- 
sin’s attempt to subdue the breakaway 
region of Chechnya has become a major 
military embarrassment for Him and his 
high command, marked by battlefield fail- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

ures, mutinous officers and a constantly 
widening credibility gap, according to 
Russian and Western analysts. 

As die military action unfolds, evidence 
has surfaced of the Russian Army's low 
readiness, lack of training, beggarly sup- 
plies and poor coordination, according to 
these analysts. It has become apparent that 
many of the troops — from generals to 
soldiers — oppose the military operation, 
often with remarkable openness. 

But even more than the soldiers in 
Chechnya’s cold and muddy fields, ana- 
lysts said, the senior leadership in Moscow 
is to blame for underestimating the mili- 
tary c h al l en g e, overpromising Russia’s 
ability to cope with it and then w«n r to 
cover up the truth. ^ 

“The question is why the military ac- 
tions have started now, at the least appro- 
priate time from a mflitary point of view M 
raid Dmitri Ostalsky, chief editor of the 
liberal newspaper Sevodnya. “This is the 
mam question. But there are many other 
questions as wdL” J 

No one doubts that the Russian armed 

See FUMBLE, Page 6 






Page 





Bosnian Serb Wants a Revamped Peace PUm 

' 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Tima Service 
P ALE, Bosma-Heraegovina 
— The Bosnian. Serbian lead- 
er. Radovan Karadzic, has set 
out his ideas for radical 
changes to an American- 
backed International peace 
plan in a memorandum of un- 
derstanding with former Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter. 

The memorandum, dis- 
played during an interview 
with Mr. Karadzic, contains 
five points that would, if ap- 
plied, involve a substantial re- 
casting of the “Contact 
Group" map accepted in July 
by the Bosnian government 
Although formulated in the 
context of a loose Bosnian 
union consisting of a Muslim- 
Croatian entity and a Serbian 
entity, the application of the 
memorandum would open the 
way for an eventual partition 
of Bosnia by dividing Sarajevo 
into two cities and making 
each territorial unit compact 
and economically viable. 

The five points in the mem- 
orandum are: the transforma- 
tion of Sarajevo into two cit- 
ies; “natural and defensible” 
frontiers for the Serbian and 
the Muslim-Croatian units; 
equal distribution of natural 
resources and infrastructure; 
the economic viability of the 
two entities, and access to the 
sea for the Bosnian Serbs. 

“The current Contact 
Group map," Mr. Karadzic 
said, “gives us 30 percent of 
the wealth of Bosnia. We must 
get SO percent. The map cuts 
our territory into Serbian en- 
claves and gives the Muslims 
continuity. We both need 
compact, contiguous land." 

In effect, the memorandum 
seeks to lay the groundwork; 
for the Bosnian Serbs’ long- 


sought goal of definitive ! 
ration from the Bosnian Mus- 
lims. 

Most of the Serbs who ac- 
counted for one-third of the 
prewar Bosnian population 
never wanted to be part of an 
independent Bosnia. A long 
war has only deepened this re- 
jection, although Mr. Karad- 
zic made it dear that he would 
be prepared to enter a loose 
Bosnian union, at least tempo- 
rarily. “if that allows the inter- 
national community to save 
face." 

Thus, the “natural and de- 
fensible frontiers" referred to 
in the memorandum clearly 
mean an end to the small Mus- 
lim enclaves in eastern Bosnia 
that Mr. Karadzic said were 
“totally non vi able.” 

The equal distribution of re- 
sources means the allocation 
of many more cities to the 
Serbs than envisaged in the 
Contact Group map. The 
Contact Group countries are 
the United States, Russia, 
Britain, France and Germany. 

The division of Sarajevo, 
Bosnian Serbian access to the 
sea and economic viability for 
each ethnic unit are essential 
preconditions for a final divi- 
sion of Bosnia, which Mr. 
Karadzic said could take place 
in about two years “assuming 
the Serbs vote to leave an 
eventual Bosnian onion." 

The Muslim-led Bosnian 
government of President Alija 
Izetbegovic is committed, 
above all, to preserving the 
territorial integrity of Bosnia 
wi thin its internationally rec- 
ognized borders. It talks of 
“liberating" Bosnia from the 
Serbs, without defining what 
that means. 

It therefore appears certain 
that the ideas in the memoran- 
dum would cause deep mis- 



Rtiurd rmro/The Attcaaied Prra 

President Izetbegovic. left, and Mr. Carter after talks Tuesday in Sarajevo. 


trust within the Bosnian gov- 
ernment, especially as it 
accepted the original Contact 
Group map — offering 51 per- 
cent of Bosnia to the MusKm- 
Ooatian federation and 49 
percent to the Serbs — on the 


basis that any changes would 
be minor. 

It also seems that all the 
frenetic recent diplomacy in 
Bosnia, including Mr. Cartel’s 
visit, may just set the stage for 
new peace talks that will 


flounder on precisely the basic 
points that nave blocked myri- 
ad previous negotiations: the 
allocation of territory and 
whether or not Bosnia should 
remain a single state within its 
present borders. 


UN Commanders Agree on Sharpening Troops’ Effectiveness 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 

THE HAGUE — Top military commanders of 
the United Nations, NATO, and nations contribut- 
ing to the UN peacekeeping force in Bosnia said 
they had agreed Tuesday on measures to strengthen 
its effectiveness, come peace or more war. 

Their recommendations included proposals to in- 
crease its size from 24,000 now and to provide it with 
new transport helicopters and aircraft, with armed 
escorts provided by NATO, to enable the UN force 
to get supplies through by air when its convoys are 
blocked on the ground. 

High-ranking military offices from 14 NATO 
countries, including the United States, said they bad 
agreed with officials from Russia and 13 other 
governments contributing to the UN force on mea- 


sures to strengthen its ability to help civilian victims 
and encourage a political settlement. 

Lieutenant General Bertrand de Lapresle of 
France, the overall commander of UN forces in the 
former Yugoslavia, made some of the proposals and 
said he backed all of them. They would make the 
UN operations less vulnerable to military coercion 
by Bosnian Serbs, who have often Mocked its supply 
convoys, and other parties to the conflict 

General John M. Shalikashvili, head of the U.S. 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, took part in the two-day 
meeting and was part of its consensus on additional 
measures, but U.S. officials said that no American 
soldiers would join the UN force. 

“The meeting’s specific recommendations cover 
various steps for improving the capabilities, effec- 
tiveness and the freedom of movement of the United 


Nations Protection Force and reducing its vulnera- 
bility,” the generals said in a communique after their 
two-day meeting ended. 


None of the recommendations was revealed in 
detail But General Henk van den Breemen of The 
Netherlands, the meeting's host, said, “We talked 
about air mobility, transport helicopters and aircraft 
and armed escort helicopters when road access is 
denied. If you look at all the proposals, the conse- 
quences could be more people/ 


The generals said they had also discussed regroup- 
ing some units to make them stronger, and had 
talked at length about a French proposal to establish 
a protected ground route from the Croatian port of 
Split to the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo through a 16- 
kuometer stretch controlled by the Bosnian Serbs. 


Christopher 
Cautions 
North on 
Lost Pilot 


WORLD BRIEFS 



Rmten 

WASHINGTON — Secre- 
tary of State Warren M. Chris- 
topher warned North Korea on 
Tuesday that further delay in 
returning the pilot of a crashed 
helicopter and his dead col- 
league would seriously concern 
Washington and affect rela- 


Shite UnMtMaMBataam&mmit 1 

talism. . on Tuesday in Manama and used 2 f ** 

of PariiamenLwhwhhas Manama where leaders of 

*“3!! * three-day sun. 


W ashing ton 

turns. 

“We have indicated that a 
further delay here in retaining 
the pilot and the remains of the 
co-pilot would be of great con- 
cern to us and would affect the 
atmosphere in which we've 
been hoping to improve our re- 
lations with North Kor 
told reporters. 


and several people have been arrested. 

Another French Socialist Says 'No’ 

A nn thfv nntAnttal Socialist C andi da t 


m T 

- -* .... 5^ 

w 

: V * 

r m .*■ 

’ 



' - 




.v ^ - 

!■,(• p 1 



. - ..y 



■ .'1 1 


... 



Korea,” he 


nie'U^. Army helicopter 
jn still unexplained 


was downed in 
circumstances after straying 
into North Korea d urin g a 
t ramrn gflight last Saturday. 

Mr. Christopher sidestepped 
a question over whether the 
United Slates should proceed 
with a landmark agreement 
with Pyongyang to reconstruct 
its nuclear industry if Washing- 
ton did not get prompt satisfac- 
tion over the helicopter inci- 
dent. “We’ve not reached that 
point yet," he said. 

The secretary of state, at a 
year-end session with reporters; 
Rflifi that as far as be knew the 
North Koreans had given no 
reason for the delay in return- 
ing the surviving pilot and the 
body of his colleague. 

“The only thing that’s been 


muutct iivuw wvv j 

PARIS (Reuters) — Another potential Sod^ist candidate for 

^^SSSSlSfjSSSB- 
%■ “sesiraKaEisSaR*-*' 

would not cut 


Another 

SSKSSSSSK. ==Sse 

Jack T anp is now the only Socialist with a prospect of reaching 
the run-off second ballot of the election m May. 

Hong Kong Wants 'Boat People? Out 

HONG KONG (AFP) — Vietnam 

ritain next month on the repatriation of all Vietnamese refugees 
---- - - before China takes over the colony m 


vfC 
-. -:rti 




■> Is 
. -s! 


w 


v? 






Uv' , . 


,v; 


. . 


Britain 
being held in 

1997, officials said Tuesday. 

The meeting is scheduled for Hanoi in mi d-Jan uary, according 
to Hong Kong officials quoted by the government-run Radio 

Television Hong Kong. „ ■ 

The requests for talks came after tne tiong Jvang gcrvcnwumi 
recently freed about 240 “boat people" after Vietnam refused to 
allow the refugees back into the country. The release was widely 
condemned in Hong Kong, and legislator passed amotion tailing 
on London to resettle the remaining refugees in Botam. About 
27,000 Vietnamese are still in detention camps. 


sfe- 


offered by way of explanation 
at all is that 


BOSNIA: Carter Says Factions Agree to Cease-Fire and New Negotiations Anti -Semitic 

Attacks Rise 


Continued hum Page 1 

armies between Friday and Jan. 


The United Nations has long 
been convinced that only such a 
cessation of hostilities would 
provide a chance of stopping 
the fighting for longer than the 


many past cease-fires that have 
quickly frayed and collapsed. 

Mr. Carter said the cease-fire 
included the western Muslim 
enclave of Bihac, which has 
been under attack by the Serbs 
for more than a month. 

The former president 


was 



* 

CORUM 

8 



B 




f 




An outstanding international collection 
of exclusive watches 



CORUM 


Horlogers-Joailliers 

1, Rue de la Pace, Paris, Tel. 42 60 10 17 


able to break a long deadlock in 
Bosnia by going directly to the 
Bosnian Serbs, ex p resring some 
sympathy for their position and 
offering considerable flexibility 
in future negotiations on the so- 
called “contact group" plan re- 
jected by the Serbs last July. 

This plan offers 51 percent of 
Bosnia to a Muslim-Croatian 
federation and 49 percent to the 
Serbs, who would have to give 
up about a third of the territory 
they now hold. 


Because Mr. Carter was not 
formally representing the 
American government . he had 
more freedom to hand out blan- 
dishments and pose for the 
cameras with Mr. Karadzic. But 
his visit was closely coordinated 
with the Clinton administra- 
tion, whose overriding aim at 
this point is to get the waning 
parties into a serious peace ne- 
gotiation. 


In Germany 


—ROGER COHEN 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 


Monday 

International Conferences and Seminars 
Tuesday 

Education Directory 
Wednesday 

Business Message Center 
Thursday 

International Recruitment 
Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 
Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 


Plus over 300 hearings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 

For further information, contact Philip Oma in Pans: 
Tel: (33-1) 463794 74- Fax: (33- 1)463752 12 


LNTEBM71UY4LM0 • « 

lieralOjjJi^enbutic. 


Reuters 

BONN — Anti-Semitic at- 
tacks by neo-Nazis and other 
far rightists have soared in the 
first nine months erf 1994, gov- 
ernment figures made public on 
Tuesday showed. 

Bonn said that 937 attacks 
directed at Jews or Jewish prop- 
erty had been recorded by the 
federal police agency BKA up 
to the end of September. 

The government, which pro- 
vided the information in re- 
sponse to a question in Parlia- 
ment by the Party of 
Democratic Socialism, the for- 
mer Communists, did not give 
comparative figures for last 
year. 

But anti-Semitic offenses for 
the whole of 1993 totaled only 
656, according to figures re- 
leased in May by Interior Min- 
ister Manfred Kanlber. 

The rise in anti-Semitic 
crimes while racist offenses ap- 


pear to be declining backs up a 
ine 


warning that Mr. Kanlher 
made then that neo-Nazis 
groups were increasingly turn- 
ing from attacking foreigners to 
targeting Jews. 

More than 30 people have 
been killed since far-nghl vio- 
lence singed after German uni- 
fication in 1990. Most of the 
victims have been foreigners. 

But the center-right coalition 
of Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
stole the thunder of racist 


the accident book 
place in a rather remote area 
some distance from Pyongyang 
and whoie the transportation is 
not very good,” he said. 

On the Korean Peninsula, 
North Korean and U.S. mili- 
tary officers held a fruitless bor- 
der meeting Tuesday to discuss 
the two fliers. 

During the 35-nrinnte meet- 
ing at Panmunjom on the inter- 
Korean border, the North Ko- 
reans refused to discuss details 
of the incident or the pilot’s 
possible repatriation, a U.S. 
military spokesman said. 

“Our ride asked for a prompt 
return of the helicopter and its 
crew,” the spokesman said 
“The North Koreans withheld 
any immediate response and 
said information concerning 
the incident will be made avail- 
able once an investigation is 
over.” 

The two sides, be said expect 
to meet again soon to discuss 
the repatriation of the pilot and 
related issues. 

North Korea said it shot 
down the helicopter over its ter- 
ritory, killing Chief Warrant 
Officer David Hilemon and 
capturing Chief Warrant Offi- 
cer Bobby Hall. The Pentagon 
has not been able to confirm 
whether it was shot down ex' 
made an emergency landing. 

The talks on Tuesday, at- 
tended by two middle-level offi- 
cers from each side, were the 
first formal discussions of the 
incident between the two rides. 

Representative William B. 
Richardson, Democrat of New 
Mexico, has been in Pyongyang 
negotiating for the release erf 
the surviving crewman and the 
repatriation of the other crew- 
man's body. 

The Yonhap news agency in 
South Korea quoted a North 
Korean diplomat at the United 
Nations as saying that Pyong- 
yang would release the pflot if 
the incident stemmed from a 
navigation error. “Isn’t it natu- 
ral to return the pilot if it is 
confirmed” the helicopter “en- 
tered the airspace because of a 
deviation from the flight 
route?” the diplomat said. 

A UJS. defense official said 
that the OH-58 reconnaissance 


Pro-life Murderer Hoping to Die ; - 

STARKE, Florida (AF)— Paul HS1, the abortionfoc sentenced 
to dwitii for the shotgun slaying of a doctor and another man 
outside an abortion chnic, said Tuesday that he hoped he would 
be executed because “I can save more people dead than alive. 

The 40-year-old former minister said he would not appeal,, 
although his death sentence will automatically be . reviewed, by 
Florida’s Supreme Coart- ; . - 

“To not hoping that .tins conviction is overturned," he said. 
“To be quite frank with you, I am hoping that it will be upheld and 
that I wall be executed.” He has portrayed himself as a martyr, 
saying the killing of doctors who p e r f o rm abortions is drvinety 
sanctioned. 


British-lrish Talks to Resume in *95 


LONDON (Reuters) — Prime Minister John. Major and the 
newly elected Irish prime minister, John Bruton, agreed Tuesday, 
to revive the search fra peace in Northern Ireland after a monih- 
long political vacuum in Dublin. 

Mr. Bruton and Mr. Major derided that mid-levd officials and 
then foreign minis ters would meet in early January to try to 
surmount obstacles to all-party talks in the province. Mr. Major 
said he welcomed early talks with the new Irish leader, who was 
elected last Thursday after the downfall of Albert Reynolds. 


V Z 

kr-- . 

i*’. w 
$ 




\U 

■-■TT 


? « 


3* r iv- 

w*::V 


.** 

ji'J 

■-.?y 




fc . - 
Qlfc- 


•_;iv 

A?.. 


lescau; 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Holiday Strikes Set at Greek Airports ,’ 

ATHENS (Renters) — Ground staff at Greek airports will hold'' 
two 48-hour strikes designed to disrupt travel during the Christ- 
mas and New Year’s holidays, a union official said Tuesday. : "• 

VassiKs Alevizopoulos, president of the civil aviation union,- 
said the stoppage would mainly affect the Athens airport. He said 
he expected hundreds of flights to be canceled during the strikes, 
scheduled for Dec. 23-24 and Dec 30-31. -* 

Mr. Alevizopoulos said 2,700 government-employed ground : 
staff responsible for most airport operations opposed the govern- - 
meat’s plans to force civil aviation to operate according to private “ 
economic criteria. 


helicopter mistakenly crossed 
over the 


groups in July 1993 by cracking 
down o; 


on a flood of foreign asy- 
lum-seekers . 


border Saturday and 
that the crew members thought 
they were still in South Korea 
minutes before they went down. 

The Pentagon announced im- 
mediate restrictions on all U.S. 
helicopter flights near the bor- 
der and said investigations of 
helicopter training and naviga- 
tion aids had been ordered. 

Yonhap quoted the North 
Korean diploma l as saying 
North Korean forces shot down 
the helicopter after the crew ig- 
nored wanting shots. 


French Airports Face Disruptions ] 

PARIS (Reuters) — Several unions from Air Inter, the French " 
domestic carrier, said Tuesday that they planned to strike during 
the holiday travel season. ** 

Four unions representing Air Inter ground crews and pilots " 
filed notices that they plan to strike at various timty between * 
Friday and Monday. A fifth union, representing Paris airport " 
workers who service foreign airliners, said it would strike between - 
Thursday and Saturday. 

Workers called off a wildcat strike Tuesday against the Norwe- 
gian state railroad NSB, allowing rail traffic to return to normal in 
time fra the Christmas rush. (AP) * 

Austria got its first significant snow of the winter Tuesday to the " 
relief of resorts that were alarmed as green dopes persisted during » 
the mildest December since 1917. More snow was predicted for 
resorts in the Tyrol over the next few days. (Reuters) l 

CSnnese train fares will rise 30 percent before the spring, the , 
government said, a further sign of the government’s losing battle • 
against inflation, Beijing reports said. (AFP) * 

Rio’s beaches, Brazilian Army troops are being deployed to 
protect visitors from petty crime, a military source said. The * 
soldiers, dad in combat fatigues, will police Copacabana, Ipan- - 
ana and other areas to combat armed petty robbers known as 1 
inAeir paih. W °° SWCe ^ a ^ OD ® beaches, stealing nearly everything - 

A resort near Indonesia’s kola volcano has reopened. Indent * 
san authorities said. The Kaliuran Hill Resort was closed last ■ 

SS at nearby Mount Merapi in _ 

centra] Java killed 60 people, Antara said. (Reuters - 

Hong Kona’s Kai Tak Airport hopes to maximize its capadty to 1 
o^e wth an increase m demand for flight slots, the deviation 
department said, by increasing use of the runways dmrinp eariyr- 
monung and late evening penods. Utilization of theseslots hmr'r 
been restricted because of complaints about noise from people “ 
living dose to the airport. (AFP)' 1 


jnnvCla?h | 
ItiiRebeU | 


*!■? 


as?:. 

Tmsc; ' 
ararc i : 
Test' 

HEKT-S:. 

oa.tr- - 
nta sic 
«rf-rr ; r, 
hSfeti’. 
tax r: 

lakr-i^ : 

to TT-J 
SBC Vi 


T3 


■ ” 

•r. 

i 




aiipsv 
Tac r*~ 
W i - 
wai-iK 

iJSfij;. - c 


ipw... 7"_ - 






Ft patiag 


&«*■. i, 

z.- 


£>r- N, \r' . — • •• 
i"- -- • 




— - . " "" ■ 


To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the World Phone® number of the country you're calling from 


Antigua 

(Available from public card phone* only.) f 2 


Induce 

Better Foreign 
Relations 


Argwniiu* 

AustrialCCIt 

Bahamas 

Bahrain 

BalgiumfCOa 

Bermuda 

Bolivia* 


CanadalCCl 
Cayman Mands 
ChlWfCC) 

Colombia(CC)* 

Costa Rica* 
Cypnn* 

Czech RepubfldCC) 


001-800-333-1111 

022-903-012 

1-800-624-1000 

800-002 

0800-10012 

1-800-623-0484 

0-800-2222 

0008012 

1-800-888-8000 

1-800824-1000 

00V-0316 

930-168001 

162 

08090000 

00-42800112 


DenmarldCOa 
Dominican Repub&C 
Ecuador +■ 

EgyptiCCI* 

(Outside of Cairo, dial 02 first.) 

0 Salvador* 

Rnland(CC)* 

France! CO# 

6am We* 

GannanyiCC) 


3001 0022 
1-800-751-6624 
170 


355-5770 

195 

9800-102-80 
19V 80-19 
00-1-99 
01308012 


(Limited availability in oa&tem Germany.) 
GraacaiCO* 00-800-1211 

Grenada*?- 1- BOO-63 4 -8721 

Guatemala* 189 

Haiti (CO-r 001-800 444-1234 

Honduras -i- 001- BOO-67 4-7000 

HungaryICQ* 00T80O81411 


Iceland* 

Irani- 
katandlCO 
tsraaHCC) 

ItidyICCI* 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

I Available from most major cities.) 080011 
Kuwait 800MCK600-624I 

Lebanon(CC) 600-624 

(Outside o( Beirut, dial 01 first.) 425-0364* 


999-002 
(SpBdol Phones Only) 
1-800-55-1001 
177-150-2727 
172-1022 
800-674-7000 


Nicaragua(CC) 

(Outside of Manaoua. dial 02 first.) 166 
NwwaytCC)* 800-19912 

Panama 108 

Military Bases 2810-108 

Paraguay!* 008-11-800 

Pen (Outside of Lima, dial 190 first.] 001-190 


Uechtenstain(CC)* 

Luxembourg 
MaxkoA 
Monaco! CC1* 

Nattier lands(CC)* 
NetlwHands AntiRatiCO*!* 


1558222 
0800-0112 
95-800 674-7000 
isv-oo-ig 
068*2-91-22 
001-800-950-1022 


Poland(CC) 
Portugal(CC) 

Puerto McdCO 
QatarfCC)<e 
RomanlalCCH- 
RusslafCO* 

San Marino(CC)* 
Saudi Arabia 
Slovak Republic ICC) 
South AfncafCCl 


0T81 -04-800-222 
05-017-1234 
1-800-8888000 
0800812-77 
01-800.1800 
8T10-800 -497-7222 


SpainICQ 
SwedentCCl* 

SwhxeriandlCa* 

SyiMCC) 

Trinidad & Tobago 
Turkey* 

Ukraine* 

United Arab Emirate* 

United XJngdomlCO . 

To call the U.S. using BT 0800-B98227t 

? “" 1 th6 UJ using MERCURY 
To call anywhere other 

than the U.S. OSMUmiLfinA 

I’LL 022 ^8“?Y (Collect not availabJa.1 
1800-11 y&VbtfohtonWCQ 180MW8W0 


900-998014 
020-795-922 
1558222 
. , 0800 
ISpadai Phones Only) 
008001-1177 
BT10813 
800-111 


00-42800112 

0800-998011 


Vatican CitytCC) 


Veneaueta+e 






**.•*»*;... n. 

.. cm r ;.. . 


Use your MCI Cant,* local teiephora card or eaB coilact all at the same low rates. 

ICC) CauMiy-to-cauntiv calling available' May not be available- in’irom all ■ntemotionsi locations. Curtain 
restriction! apply. + Limited availability, v Wm for second dial tone. ▲ Avedablo From LADATEL public 
phones only. Ret* depends on cad ongm in Mcaico. t Intcmaiiotw nxnmumieationE cantor. + Not avail- 
able from public pay phones. • Public phones may require deposit of com or phone card tor dial tone. 




172-1022 

800-11148 


Let It 1 ake You Around The World 

RW3 


... r 



jhTWM. La’* 

5 : 

SSfe-wm 

llht 5 in 


If- 


Jmprimvpor Offprint, ?3 rue de I'Esongile. 75 018 Paris. 


~r: 


bar 8 r «... r.-.„ 





.-- ‘sav* 




G 










IjSjO 


§FS 


ra in 







k V.V 


^ople Gin 


pi!!-' {») [jj e 


TS^AMEmCAS / 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1994 


Page 3 




Police Wound Man 

Brandishing Knife 

Near White House 


ysssz sr_“rx 

wSte S HoS 8inCident near **“ 

waite House in two months, a 
fcSSf 1 ®* 1 br andishing a 

otficers on Tuesday as he stood 
outeide the building, the police 
and wun esses said. ^ 

n(J5fe. m ^' OQe of a group of 
EfL^.W >n Lafayette 
Whit^S Ule slreel fro “ die 

SwSf a l? J fc' M- He *“ never 

tbreatened, the police said. 

videotape of the shooting 
showed at least four police offi- 
cers standing several feet in 
front of Mr. CornieL pointing 
their guns. Mr. Comiel was 
standing relatively still with a 
'•*!?" e “ his hands when one of 
[he officers advanced toward 
him and fired twice. 

Major Robert Hines of the 
U.S. Park Police said the shoot- 
ing appeared to be justified. 

“If somebody is brandishing 
a knife, it is justified to shoot 
him,” he said. “The officer 
feared for his safety, so he shot 
the man." 

Mr. Comiel was wounded 
once in the chest and once in 
the right leg and was in critical 
condition, according to a 
George Washington University 
Hospital officiaL 
The incident is the third in- 
volving gunshots near the 
White House since late Octo- 
ber. 

On Oct 29, a man peppered 
the north side of the White 
House with 29 rounds fired 
from a semiautomatic weapon. 


Leaner Government? Powerful Interests Will Have Nays 


Two tourists wrestled the man 
to the ground. 

The Secret Service arrested 
Francisco Martin Duran, 26. an 
upholsterer from Colorado 
Springs. He was indicted on 15 
counts, including the attempted 
assassination of the president, 
which carries a life term upon 
conviction. 

No one has been arrested in 
the second shooting, which oc- 
curred Saturday. At least four 
bullets were fired at the South 
Side of the White House from 
the Ellipse. 

The Secret Service said Mon- 
day that the bullets came from 
“a great distance" away and 
that investigators had found no 
conclusive evidence that the 
presidential mansion was a tar- 
get. 

The man who was shot Tues- 
day had threatened park police- 
men earlier, according to one 
witness. Wade Varner, 37, said 
Lhe man had been roused out of 
bed on Monday morning by 
park policemen and had shout- 
ed, “I’m going to get you!" 

Major Hines said an officer 
patrolling the public sidewalk 
in front of the White House saw 
the man r unnin g toward him 
and carrying a knife. The offi- 
cer tried to detain the man, he 
said. 

A backup Park Police officer 
quickly arrived and warned the 
suspect two or three times to 
drop the knife. Major Hines 
said. 

“The man did not drop his 
knife, so he shot him, " Major 
Hines said. The backup officer 
fired both shots. Major Hines 
said. The man collapsed less 
than 10 feet (3 meters) from Lhe 
White House gate. (AP, WP) 


By John H. Cushman Jr. 

Vm' York Turin 

WASHINGTON — Senior 
administration officials have 
conceded that there are many 
potential obstacles to the bud- 
get cuts in energy, transporta- 
tion and housing programs an- 
nounced by President Bill 
Clinton. 

The plan to reshape, abolish 
or sell off scores of federal pro- 
grams, outlined by Mr. Clinton 
on Monday, is a first step to- 
ward financing his proposed 
tax breaks for the middle class 
and remaining competitive with 


the Republicans in the race to 
shrink the government. 

Mr. Clinton said that his pro- 
posals would yield S24 billion 
in savings over five years. 

But although the basic orders 
about where to cut have been 
banded down by the White 
House, there are many deci- 
sions yet to come on exactly 
where and how to cut. 

Some of the proposals would 
end programs that have strong 
advocates in Congress and in 
industry . Indeed, some of the 
reductions have been proposed 
in the past, only to be rejected. 

One of the biggest proposed 


cuts, which is virtually certain 
to bring objections when the 
details become known, is in the 
Energy Department's program 
to clean up pollution left from 
decades of nuclear weapons 
production. 

Of the $10.6 billion the Ener- 
gy Department has proposed to 
cut, $4.4 billion is in its environ- 
mental budget. Environmental 
groups said such cuts would 
mean the department would fall 
billions of dollars short of the 
amount that must be spent to 
meet obligations. 

But officials said they would 
delay only low-risk programs 


and would realize savings at 
high-priority projects by being 
more efficient, not by delaying 
them. 

Another $1-2 billion of the 
cuts in the Energy Department 
would come in its applied re- 
search programs, some of which 
have powerful constituencies. 

While officials said Monday 
that the agency would definitely 
halt its extensive research into 
burning coal more cleanly, they 
could not say whether the de- 
partment would also stop pay- 
ing for research into nuclear fu- 
sion, an exotic potential energy 
source, or whether it would 


dose one of the national labora- 
tories where other physics re- 
search is done. 

In the Department of Hous- 
ing and Urban Development, 
Secretary Henry G. Cisneros 
produced a plan to stre amlin e 
the agency but not a proposal 
that would result in significant 
savings. 

At two briefings with report- 
ers on Monday, be detailed a 
plan that would collapse 60 of 
the department's progr ams into 
three broad grant programs, 
free local housing authorities 
from a host of federal regula- 
tions and provide residents in 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Armey; ‘Hot President’s Treasury 1 fame to Know; Thomas J. Bliley Jr. Stink at Pig Farm and Bush Library 


WASHINGTON — The House Republican lead- 
er, Richard 1C. Armey of Texas, has asserted that the 
Clinton administration is misusing Treasury De- 
partment economists to support “blatantly politi- 
cal" attacks on Republican tax and spending pro- 
posals. 

Mr. Armey, a conservative former economics pro- 
fessor who has spent much of his 10 years in Con- 
gress calling for far-reaching and often controversial 
changes in economic policy, criticized assessments 
by Treasury staff economists that showed that Re- 
publican lax-cutting measures would pose a high 
risk of adding to the deficit. Administration officials 
used those estimates to underscore their claims that 
the proposals were fiscally irresponsible. 

Mr. Armey asserted that the administration's ac- 
tions violated ethical and professional standards 
governing the use of the federal employees. 

“This is not the president's Treasury,” he said in 
an interview. "It's the people’s Treasury, and I have 
to tell you Pm offended by this." 

Treasury officials rejected Mr. Armey’s criticism. 
“We think on proposals that have a high likelihood 
of being brought to Congress and passed by Con- 
gress, particularly at a time when people are worried 
about fiscal responsibility, that it is in the public 
interest to release numbers if we have them,” said 
Leslie Samuels, assistant Treasury secretary for tax 
policy. (WP) 


WASHINGTON — He is an undertaker whose 
family has run the most prominent funeral home in 
Richmond, Viriginia, for more than a century. He is 
so loyal to his roots in tobacco country that he keeps 
a framed picture with every brand of cigarette made 
by Philip Morris in his congressional office. 

Few people outside of Richmond have heard of 
Representative Thomas J. Bliley Jr. They soon will. 

Thanks to the midterm election in which Republi- 
cans captured control of both chambers of Con- 
gress, and to his friendship with Newt Gingrich, the 
House speaker-designate. Mr. Bliley will take over 
one of the most powerful and sprawling domains 
within the House: the Energy and Commerce Com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Bliley, who is set to replace Representative 
John D. Dingell, will be shaping laws affecting a 
huge range of industries. 

It is a committee with a huge mandate, though the 
new Republican leaders have somewhat pared down 
its authority. And Mr. Bliley, a folksy and unfailing- 
ly courteous politician who is 62, makes it clear that 
he win push for much lighter regulation of b usiness. 

Forget, for example, about regulating tobacco as a 
drug, an idea that had been championed by some 
committee Democrats. “I don't know that well get 
around to that," be said last week, in a supreme 
understatement. (NYT) 


COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Residents of a 
rural area near Texas A & M University are raising a 
fuss over the relocation of a pig f arm bong displaced 
by construction of the George Bush Presidential 
Library. 

School officials plan to move the Texas A & M 
Swine Center from a comer of the 90-acre (36- 
hectares) library site a few miles west to a place 
known as Brushy Community. 

“The bottom line is. Brushy Community residents 
don't want the pigs out there," said Tam Garland, an 
A & M veterinarian whose home would be about 
300 yards from the pig center. “Whether it’s five pigs 
or 500 pigs, we don’t want them. You can’t keep a 
pig from stinking." tAP) 

Quote t Unquote 

Judith Schaeffer of People for the American Way, 
a liberal advocacy group, on the planned lawsuit by 
a Mississippi woman who says her children have 
been harassed and ridiculed for opting out of pray- 
ers and Bible studies held at her school: ‘Tins 
illustrates what is likely to happen if Newt Gingrich 
should prevail in passing a school prayer amend- 
ment It shows the kind of intimidation and harass- 
ment that children in religious minorities are going 
to suffer, rather by forced participation or by con- 
spicuous abstention." (WP) 


the country's 1.4 million public 
housing units with vouchers to 
pay for homes provided by ci- 
ther the public sector or the 
private sector. 

Mr. Cisneros said that the 
restructuring would save the 
housing agency about $800 mil- 
lion over five years, slightly 
more than [percent of the $60 
billion the Clinton administra- 
tion hopes to find in spending 
cuts to finance its middle-class 
tax breaks. 

The secretary said that a 
number of the changes had 
been contemplated for several 
months and did “not emerge 
From thin air." But he acknowl- 
edged that the results of elec- 
tions last month and the admin- 
istration's heightened desire to 
streamline government acceler- 
ated the process. 

At the Transportation De- 
partment the administration 
wants to save $6.7 billion in the 
next five years, slightly more 
than 3 percent of the $200 bil- 
lion the department had intend- 
ed to spend during that period. 

The precise cuts will not be 
announced until Mr. Clinton 
submits his budget in February. 
They will reduce what the de- 
partment sends to the states 
and communities for highways, 
air and rail transportation and 
mass transit, officials said. 

In addition. Transportation 
Secretary Federico F. Pena re- 
submitted a proposal from ear- 
lier this year to turn over the 
government’s air traffic control 
operation to a semiprivate cor- 
poration. 

The proposal has strong Re- 
publican support but was 
blocked in Congress this year 
largely by the opposition of two 
Democratic subcommittee 
chairmen who will no longer 


hold the offices in the Republi- 
can Congress, Senator Wendell 
H. Ford of Kentucky and Rep- 
resentative James L. Oberstar 
of Minnesota. 


Mexicans 
■ -v- Brace for 
Army Clash 
With Rebels 




i, .-irk Airport 


intif'fi? 


By Tod Rpbberson 

Washington PostSenk^ „ • • 

EL BOSQUE, Mexico — 
Thousands of fearful Mexicans 
cowered in their homes here 
Tuesday, awaiting a confronta- 
tion between advancing Mexi- 
can Army troops and peasant 
rebels who seized this and doz- 
ens of other southern towns ear- 
ly Monday- 

Armed rebels of the Zapa- 
tista National liberation Army 
established scores of road- 
blocks and checkpoints across a 
wide swath of Chiapas state in a 
surprise “military action” Mon- 
day, virtually doubling the 
amount of territory the rebels 
have controlled since launching 
an uprising last Jan. 1. 

Their presence here in a re- 
gion far beyond the govern- 
ment-recognized Zapatista 
zone of control poses an in- 
creasingly difficult dilemma for 
President Ernesto Zedillo Pon- 
ce de L6on, who pledged upon 
t aking office Dec. 1 that gov- 
ernment troops would not be 
the first to break an 11 -month- 
old cea se-fire with the rebels. 

It was dear from the scene 
here Tuesday that unless Mr. 
Zedillo authorizes the use of 
armed force, he will be unable 
to permanently dislodge the Za- 
patistas from their new posi- 
tions. 

With the Mexican Army, so 
far honoring Mr. Zedillo s 
cease-fire pledge, the Zapatistas 
have fdt free to pushrieepty 
into the central part of Chiapas 
and now claim more than a 
third of the state as “territory m 

rebellion." . . 

Less than a mOe outside El 
Bosque, at least 16 Zapatistas 
wearing ski masks and toting 
bunting rifles entrenched them- 
selvraTucscky mormng across 
the main highway hnjang the 
large municipality ci Simojovej 
with the state capital, Tuxtla 

GU A^32 kilometers (20 
mfles) south along the same 
highway at Puerto Calc, sw™} 

hundred Mexican , anny tro^ 

and federal judicial pobce, 
armed with assault nfles and 
Seed by helicopters and a col- 
S?F2moredvdu^.dow- 
i y advanced toward rebel posi- 

ti< The state attorney general, 
Torae Enrique Hernandez, who 
!°?»Sg ^th the c onvoy, 
«id that the gov® 111396111 ]?™! 
2h was to reopen K»ds and 
mvros and potice were un- 
ffSES-JS* to engage 

,he , n Z r& mbels War; 
Jw had cut phone IuksW 

Slck^ci^iaMfrom leaving. 

had temam and his 

^JJLSsoTcarlos Salinas de 

g^^rftoreachanesou- 
atod settlement- 


' 1 r ■■ Hfig* - 

' XSSM 

iii % 


A* .n " r 

J . "&*v W. 


Tobacco Industry Accused of Faking Data 


:m if:; 

, • A *, ; 

ms n. y&.i\ 





Away From Politics 


• Manufactured dtiorine in the stratosphere 

— not natural phenomena — is the primary 
cause of the ozone hole above Antarctica, 
NASA scientists say. They cited three years of 
data from a NASA satellite. (LAT) 

9 A judge forbade for 10 more days the appli- 
cation of Orison’s new law legalizing assisted 
suicide. The federal judge said he would de- 
cide within that time whether to enjoin the 
law, which was approved by voters on Nov. 8 
and would permit doctors to prescribe a lethal 
injection to terminally ill patients who re- 
quest it. (Reuters) 

• A former Postal Service accounting supervi- 

sor pleaded guilty in Providence; Rhode Is- 
land, to stealing $3.5 million in what officials 
said was the biggest embezzlement in the post 
office’s 220-year history. (AP) 

• The victfcn of a drive-by shooting is entitled 
to medical benefits under his father's automo- 


bile insurance policy, under a 4-to-3 ruling by 
the New Jersey Supreme Court. At issue was 
whether the shooting was an “accident" as 
defined by state automobile insurance stat- 
utes. (NYT) 

• A man who admitted setting the bones of a 

Cheyenne Indian dug up in Montana faces up 
to two years in prison under a law designed to 
protect Indian burial grounds. (AP) 

• A gunman who killed Ins landlord, the land- 
lord's wife and a bystander in the New York 
City borough of Queens was facing eviction 
from his apartment, the police said. “The guy 
apparently just flipped out," they said. (AP) 

• The Environmental Protection Agency ap- 

proved a plan for 12 states to reduce smog 
sharply by requiring automakers to make a 
new class of less-polluting vehicles to be sold 
primarily in the Northeast by 1999. ( WP) 


Edward DeBartolo, Mall Builder, Dies 


New York Times Service 

Edward John DeBartolo, a 
real estate developer who 
helped create the suburban 
shopping mall and used his suc- 
cess .to invest in horse racing 
and professional sports teams, 
died from pneumonia on Mon- 
day at his home in Youngstown, 
Ohio. He was 85 years old. 

Mr. DeBartolo built his first 
shopping mail in 1948 in 
Youngstown and went on to 
build more than 200 others in 
20 states. IBs company was 
ranked as the fourth-Iaigest 
owner of shopping and retail 
space in the nation last year. . 

Besides real estate, Mr. De- 
Bartolo and his family bought 
the San Francisco 49ers foot- 
ball team and the Pittsburgh 
Penguins hockey team. He also 
owned three horse racing 
tracks, and recently began de- 
veloping riverboat gaming casi- 
nos. . | 

Mr. DeBartolo was bora in 
Youngstown, the son of Italian 
immigrants, and began working 
early in construction. 

To take advantage of the 
growth of the suburbs after 
World War II, he built shop- 


ping plazas and mails in the 
1940s, *50s and ’60s. 

He was often quoted as say- 
ing that his early strategy for 
building real estate was: “Stay 
out in the country. That’s the 
new downtown." 

Bradford Morse, UN Aide 
And U.S. Congressman, 73 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — 
Bradford Morse, 73, a promi- 
nent former five-term Republi- 
can congressman from Massa- 
chusetts and a past under- 
secretary-general of the United 
Nations, died Sunday at his 
home in Naples, Florida. 

Mr. Morse served in the UN 
post from 1972 to 1975, the 
highest ranking American in . 
the world body. He helped cre- 
ate the UN International Emer- 


PEATH NOTICE 

Elizabeth Carmalt 

1903-1994 

Slie lived ;in extraraxKnniy life 
with wonderful Friends. 


Dough, Engje/Tbc Auodatni Pirss 

Aimed peasants on die move Tuesday outside the rebel zone in Mexico’s Chiapas state. 


By Philip J. Hilts 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — The to- 
bacco industry’s scientific data 
Showing that second-hand 
smoke was not a significant 
hazard in workplaces may have 
. been faked, according to former 
employees who helped make 
the measurements. 

In a report issued by the staff 
of Representative Henry A. 
Waxman, statements from for- 
mer employees of Healthy 
Buildings International, raw 
data from the company’s field 
inspections of 585 buildings 
and independent analysis 
showed that “the industry may 
have used improper and fraud- 
ulent scientific data in conduct- 
ing research on environmental 
tobacco smoke.” 

Mr. Waxman, Democrat of 
California, is the outgoing 
chair man of the health and en- 
vironment subcommittee. 

The data found to be suspect 
is among the most important of 
all the work died by industry 
spokesmen to back up their case 
that second-hand smoke is not 
dangerous. 

Dr. Stanton Glantz, a cardi- 
ologist at the University of Cal- 
ifornia and an anti- smoking ad- 
vocate who has studied the 
tobacco company claims on 
second-hand smoke, said Tues- 
day: 

“This data is just crucial. The 
argument of the tobacoo com- 
panies has been that the expo- 
sure levels of environmental to- 
bacco smoke in workplaces is so 
low as to be trivial If this data 
is fraudulent, it throws into 
question all their assertions." 

The data, he said, have been 


used in Congress, in litigation, 
and is now being presented be- 
fore the next major forum to 
decide on second-hand smoke 
— the Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration. That 
agency is bolding hearings on 
whether to ban smo kin g in 
American workplaces, and the 
companies have presented the 
Healthy Buildings Internation- 
al data as a significant part of 
their argument against the pro- 
posed rule. 


numbers were changed, but for 
good reasons, and there was no 
fabrication.” 

The tobacco industry has 
paid Healthy Buildings Inter- 
national millions of dollars over 
the last decade to carry out tests 
of indoor air quality and to tes- 
tify (Ml behalf of the industry in 
many forums, including before 
Congress. 

The company was the princi- 
ple business relied on by the 
industry for data to show that 
cigarette smoking does not cre- 
ate substantial indoor air pollu- 
tion problems. 

But reviewing the raw data 
for the company’s field survey 
of 585 buildings, which was lat- 
er published in a scientific jour- 
nal and presented as testimony 
to Congress, Mr. Waxman said 
his staff and an independent 
analyst had found that “there 
were more than 150 significant 
alterations” of the data. That 
would mean that more than 25 
percent of the data was altered 
from what technicians actually 
measured in the field compared 
to what the company reported. 


gency Operation for Africa, 
which sent food to famine- 
stricken sub-Sahara Africa in 
1984-86. 

While in the House, he was a 
member of the Foreign Affairs 
Committee. 

Lilia Skaia, a stage and 
screen actress in her 90s best 
known for her portrayal of the 
headstrong Mother Superior in 
the 1963 film “lilies of the 
Field," died Sunday at her 
home in Bay Shore, New York. 

Pedro Collar de MeBo, 42, 
whose revelations of high-level 
corruption in Brazil led to the 
impeachment of his brother. 
President Fernando Collor de 
Mello, in 1992, died of brain 
cancer Monday in New York. 


For investment 
information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the iHT 


'•) EUROPEAN PUB-CRAWL 

S i Dublin IN FINE IRISH COMPANY 

2ffil^ GndG | d Srh -TcL W0JO50- Fu 

Camr Not 5nu Mini 5-7 - TcL 2SOJS7 5 - Fn 2KUM0. (m&ro Mira Crisna). 
BRUXELLES 

O, tadnanl Gnrinmcne imetro Sctanami) - TcL 2 J0.787S - F« 1 30.7402. 
PARIS 

10, rneda Csjmdnts (mam Open) - Td 40.1 5. (XL JO - FnCJ6.fl.S4, 

Tames Jovce 71. l.«ik-vanl Ununi^ilgiriT imclru. HER Pane 

PllJj " %it Frvuc Bw> Tranauli - Trl -H1B.Hi.X2 - F« diHSW 


Monday 

MONDAY SPORTS 

In addition to the daily sports pages, Monday 
Sports is expanded to include full weekend 
results of international sporting events. On 
these pages, you 1 !! find the outcomes of tennis, 
soccer, football, baseball, cricket, basketball, 
rugby, golf and many other sports. 

Every Monday in the International Herald 
Tribune. 


INTERNATIONAL 


The alterations consistently 
undercounted the amount of 
cigarette smoke, as measured 
by respirable suspended parti- 
cles. 

Several examples of the ap- 
parently faked data listed m 
Mr. Waxman's staff report: 

• An inspection of the Impe- 
rial Bank Building in San Diego 
in 1989 -showed that one room, 
with two people smoking in it, 
registered 150 nricrograms per 
cubic meter of particles in the 
air, three times what the federal 
standard allows. 

Gregory Wulchin, who car- 
ried out the measurements for 
Healthy Buildings Internation- 
al, tola Mr. Waxman’s staff: 
“After I submitted my field 
notes to HBI, Gray Robertson, 
the HBI president, changed the 
particular measurement I re- 
corded for the sample. In his 
own handwriting, he struck out 
the number ‘ISO* in the field 
notes and inserted the number 
‘75/” 

a • In December 1989, techni- 
cians tried to sample air in a 
cafeteria but could not because 
the monitoring equipment 
needed was not there. Never- 
theless, the company reported 
that a measurement had been 
taken and that the level in the 
smoking section was 30 micro- 
grams per cubic meter, well be- 
low federal standards. 

• The report showed that one 
frequent problem with the data i 
reported was that the size of the 


AMS1BBMM 


DE VUEGENDE SCHOTEL 


Vtogetoricsi kdchen. 
OpenM/ 16.30 -23 SO 
Kkhen open 17.30-22.15 
NEUWE IEUESHAAI 162 
fiasanonw 0204252041. 

MEUUr-SUMBNE 


jAMASSE 

Sao food and lull spadaBtiu. Froth daily 
delivery. Private bongos lor 14. Closed 
Sunday owning. M. Hymns). 4. w. Madrid. 
TeL (1] 46.24.07-56. Fa* 40.68.3540. 


CARR'S wsh 

RESTAURANT BAR 

Franch/hfehaAine. WeefanJ brunch 75F. 
Open 7/7. N PAHS. CAJUTS BAR 6 NEVB FAR. 
1, me duAVrtThetcr Tel : 42 6tl6fl.?6 


AUX LYONNAIS 

TiudSonui bistro coating in authentic 1900 
decor. Excellent wines A mineral waters. 
32, rue SL Mac. TeL |1) 42 9665 04. 


nuasM 

LEMUMCHE 

Itw Bramria of 


room in which the measure- 
ment was taken was falsified, 
apparently in order to underes- 
timate the amount of smoke 
measured. 

Inspection of an office in 
Richmond, Virginia, in August 
of 1989, conducted by Mr. Wul- 
chin, showed that the office was 
1,000 square feet (90 square me- 
ters). It was reported as 300 
square feet When the volume 
of air is divided by the number 
of cigarettes smoked, it thus 
produced a falsely low amount 
of cigarette smoke per cubic 
meter of air, according to the 
report. 


NEW YEAR’S PARTIES 



RASWVTXXE 

58, rue de Bass.ino - 75008 PARIS | 

Tel. 47.20.04.31 -08.58 

LOUEZ POUR NOEL, 

\ ST-SYLVESTRE ET LE 
NOUVEL AN RUSSE 
LE 13 JANVIER 



YUGARAJ 

Hated as iho bed bndton nsbumnl in Ftoncu 
by lhe Imfing gwdes fair condtenad). 14, me 
DoupNne. T.- 43.26.44.91 


THOUMIEUX 

Speciofatiej of lhe Saurh-Wesl Conhl de 
canard & ampule) au conhl de canard Aw 
conditioned. Open everyday. 79 rue 
SUJomauqwj. T tL: (1) 47.05.4975. Near 
Inuoldu Tenmd. 


NEW YEAR'S EVE AT 
LETOITDE PARIS 

Gcto Dinner an Dec e mber 31 A 1994 
at Le Tot de Ani an 4 k IQh floor 
induing a qtenefid view an S» 

EtU Tower Spedd New Yetn'i Eve 
menu wflh 1/2 bade ct Champagne 
to tie sound oi an orcheara 
FT 1450 Ind. cSmer and dancing. 
RarbHfan 10, ov.Sufan. 7:4438-5637. 


CHEZ FRED 

One of flu aides) bunas of 
French hxCtcnd cooking. I90bkbd.fttam. 
Resenctiom. Tel.: (1] 4574.20.48 


KERVANSARAY 

Turkish & N’l specialties, lobster bar, best 


Spedctfec coif's brer, ‘choucraute*. seobocL leetoad restauraN, Is! Baas. Mchlanit.9. 
Open ewy (fay, unW2o.w 7,n*SaW Tel: 5I28B43 Air conckioned. 80m. Opera 


I vm tens ran nun «n tm wuumcton i 


Benofl. F a or g Si GermairvdeyPris. 
Ti. 42.61.12-70 


NoanS pjn. & 6 p m.-lam. weep) Sundry 
OpenhaWayi 




Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1994 


OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


PUBLISHED WITH THE .NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON TOST 


Hard Line in Beijing 


their own political futures by appearing 


It is extraordinary and more than a 
little alarming. The world’s most popu- 
lous country, a nuclear power with a 
booming, internationalized economy, is 
frozen into hard-line immobility on a 
wide range of policies because its nona- 
ian supreme leader li es dying and 
beneath him fear jeopardizing 

m po 

too flexible. 

Some of the effects of this succession 
crisis are now bong felt throughout the 
world, but the primary and most brutal 
effects are felt in China itself. Crucial 
reforms of state industry have been post- 
poned repeatedly. Arbitrary challenges 
and revisions have left foreign investors 
questioning the reliability of tbeir con- 
tracts. Most recently, human rights and 
democracy activists have been subjected to 
a new round of repression that is ferocious 
even by China's harsh standards. Last 
week, nine defendants drew cruelly exces- 
sive sentences for distributing four articles 
og human and workers’ rights. One man 
was condemned to an incredible 20 years' 
imprisonment, seven years more than 
was imposed on the alleged masterminds 
of the Tiananmen Square movement 
These sentences form part of a pat- 
tern that includes the rearrest last spring 
of China’s most famous democrat Wei 
Jingsheng; the six-year sentence im- 
posed last month on an internationally 
respected journalist Gao Yu; and the 
menacing harassment of a former stu- 
dent leader, Wang Dan. 

The roots of this crackdown are do- 
mestic, but its severity reflects Beijing’s 
perception that it can now ignore inter- 
national human rights pressure. The tri- 
al that brought last week’s sentences had 


twice before been postponed: in 1993 
when China was seeking the 2000 Olym- 
pics, and last spring when President Bill 
Clinton was weighing extension of Chi- 
na’s low-tariff access to the U.S. market. 
Turning down that Olympic bid and 
extending trade access without human 
rights conditions reduced the outside 
world’s leverage. 

Despite Mr. Clinton’s condliatoiy pol- 
icies, the United States, too, has felt the 
new chill from Beijing. Washington’s fa- 
vorable tariff decision brought no honey- 
moon but a fresh burst of Chinese 
threats. Beijing warned that it would re- 
taliate if the United Slates persisted in 
holding China to reasonable standards 
for joining the new World Trade Organi- 
zation, and in demanding that it crack 
down on copyright piracy. Meanwhile, as 
the United Stales hastens to re-establish 
military cooperation, Beijing has escalat- 
ed its rhetoric over a minor naval surveil- 
lance incident earlier this year. 

Given this present touchiness, Wash- 
ington needs to avoid gratuitous provo- 
cation. But it cannot avoid asserting 
legitimate U.S. interests from trade to 
security to human rights. 

Republicans who have criticized the 
Clin ton administration’s overly accom- 
modating China policies will soon hold 
key committee chairs. The administra- 
tion, which is considering sending either 
Vice President Al Gore or HUlaiy Rod- 
ham Clinton to Beijing next year, would 
be wise to consult first with Republicans 
and seek bipartisan agreement on how 
to stand up to today’s Chinese bullying 
without wrecking a valuable long-term 
relationship. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Carter Out of Control 


Two Bosnia negotiations are under 
way, and the first, between President 
Bill Clinton and former President Jim- 
my Carter, is definitely the more nerve- 
racking. Stepping back from his own 
Bosnia duties, Mr. Clinton took a flier 
and bowed to the irrepressible Mr. Car- 
ter, apparently hoping he could exploit 
or at least control him. Monday morn- 
ing it looked doubtful. Mr. Carter’s 
characteristic one-sided embrace of the 
party most opposed to American policy 
forced the White House to issue an 
emergency rebuke. By day’s end, more- 
over, it was still doubtful. Jimmy Carter 
seemed to be undercutting American 
policy and possibly putting President 
Clinton in the position of having to 
repudiate a mission gone off the track. 

The a dminis tration had hoped that 
the Bosnian Serb regime, unable to 
translate battlefield gains into political 
normalization, would make to the a]>- 
preciative Mr. Carter concessions that it 
would not make to the accusing Mr. 
Clinton. But the regime did not make 
meaningful concessions. It took advan- 
tage of the goodwill and innocence of its 
invited guest to move the discussion in a 
way that may yet rebound against the 
United States. 

Radovan Karadzic, the Bosnian Serb 
leader, offers full movement for United 
Nations peacekeepers. But he has zero 
credibility on this issue; he broke even 
his promises to Mr. Carter, who brushed 
off the betrayaL He has used peacekeep- 


ers as hostages. Anyway, how can he 
object if the United Nations feeds the 
refugees he creates? 

Mr. Karadzic offers a four-month re- 
newable cease-fire. But what is this? As 
the victor, he has long been seeking to 
start a cease-fire to cement bis conquests 
and preempt the Muslim-led Bosnian 
government’s r earming . 

He offers to join talks on the Ameri- 
can-sponsored “contact group’s" peace 
plan, which he has long reviled. But now 
suddenly his government hails the plan 
as the “basis’' for talks, evidently mean- 
ing to renegotiate it, not to accept it. 
And for all of these promises, including 
extravagant pledges to respect every- 
one's human rights and — this from Mr. 
Ethnic Cleansing himself — to let peo- 
ple live where they please, Jimmy Carter 
is prepared to reward him by removing 
UN sanctions forthwith. 

Through two administrations, Ameri- 
can officials have averted their gaze 
from Bosnia or hoped that others would 
somehow fix it Tire latest instance is the 
Carter mission. But it was idle to think 
that the Bosnian Serbs could be lulled 
by sweet talk. Mr. Carter is moving 
forward as though to proclaim his mis- 
sion a success. So far, nothing of sub- 
stance suggests that it is. 

Unwelcome as the task may be, this is 
the right moment for American policy in 
Bosnia to be reclaimed by the president 
of the United States. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Foreign Aid at Risk 


Republican Senator Mitch McCon- 
nell's proposal to deeply slash aid to 
Africa, aad restrictions to Russian assis- 
tance, cut levels elsewhere except in Eu- 
rope and the Middle East, tuck the Peace 
Corps under the State Department and 
abolish the Agency for International De- 
velopment had the predictable, explosive 
effect at the State Department. 

That is understandable. But as dis- 
turbing as the changes seem to be, there 
is at least one small consolation for AID 
officials. Compared with the way many 
Republicans m the new Republican- 
controlled Congress feel about foreign 
aid. Senator McConnell — who will 
chair the influential foreign aid appro- 
priations subcommittee — may be some- 
thing of a moderate. At least he isn’t out 
to kill the whole idea. 

Make no mistake, the McConnell bill 
sharply alters the shape of the system. 
Programs designed to slow population 
growth and fight malnutrition, illiteracy 
and poverty in some of the poorest na- 
tions will give way to a new charter nar- 
rowly focused on American economic 
and security interests. “Most poor coun- 
tries are still poor” despite years of U.S. 
aid — so what’s the point? says Senator 
McConnell. Under his bill, countries with 
free market policies and open trading 
systems will get first dibs on American 
aid. Former Soviet republics other than 


Russia receive earmark protection previ- 
ously accorded Israel and Egypt. 

The Clinton administration says it has 
pursued policies promoting growth, sta- 
bility, the well-bong of emerging demo- 
cracies and the Flow of U.S. exports with 
increasing efficiency and effectiveness 
over that of preceding Republican ad- 
ministrations. There is some truth to that. 
But the administration and Senator 
McConnell are far apart in their ap- 
proaches to foreign aid reforms. For Sen- 
ator McConnell, making Africa the big 
loser, cutting already sharply curtailed 
spending by 20 percent and protecting 
the more politically potent Middle East 
and Eastern Europe aid flows is the way 
to advance U.S. interests. This is a central 
point of difference. It is also where the 
debate should be joined. 

For people who believe that this boun- 
tiful country has a responsibility at least 
to join with other better-off nations and 
help those in extreme deprivation. Sena- 
tor McConnell's approach is the wrong 
response. That isn't to say that AID’S 
basic assumptions should not be chal- 
lenged. The Oin ton administration must 
prove convincingly that foreign aid works 
— that it serves America’s national inter- 
ests and those of recipient nations. Refut- 
ing the assumptions in the McConnell 
bill provides that opportunity. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 



International Herald Tnbune 

ESTABLISHED !SS7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher & Chief Executive 
JOHN VINOCUR. EuaahvEdbnr & McePraidm 

• WALTER WELLS. Afeuafifcw • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES MI1CHELMORE, Deputy Editors* CARL GEWlRTZ, Auxiciaie EJrtnr 

•ROBERT i. DONAHUE EAarvifihe EJhnrid Puges • JONATHAN GAGE. Businm and Fnhjntr Edilor 

• REN£ BQNDY. Defvry Publisher* JAMES McLEOD. Advertising Director 
•JUANITA L CASPAR], hutmaunJ DeivLpmcraDimW ROBERT FARRE. QniAawj Dinsmr. Europe 

DirrantrJc Li PiMkmim Richard D. Smunars 
Di renew Adpttni Je kr PuNicatum: KarhumeP. Darmv 


HeruU TrihurK. 181 A\mieCharksdeGsiiille.92S21 NeuiIly->ur-Seire.lTjnoe. 
Tel. : I li46Ji7.93.nl}. fiix : Cur. 46_17 «l 5I; Adv, 46.3751 1 1 Irtcrntt nTr®km*cnue 

EiSbv for Ao,l Michael Rkfamlstn 5 Ctrterfvrr Rd. Sngnpvt 05//. TeL /A5l-f7T-7/W£ Fax: 1(6) 274-23.U 
.« it Oir. Am. KnmepuH Si GHumr AL Hag Km. TeL X52-V22-JIXL Fax /JS2-W222-//9U. 

Ciw Mgr. Genteen- T. Srtiiihr. FriubHwr IS. frnntorjtfW. TeL |0W) 72 til 55. Fax: \0W) 72 72 IQ 
PnvL'S: Meharl Came. AS I Third Air. ,W fort. NY TeL l2l2l 7S2.VM. Fax: f 2/21 755JGHS 

I' K hhvftimw Office: 02 Dug Acre. London WC2. Tel. 1071) MWWi Fax: (071) 2411-2254. 
V 4 an • npinil de / 2W.iHKI F RCS A Innterre B 722021 126. Commtwwn Partimre So. 61327 
£ I'Nf.hkmmtxdHemklTnhune. AS ri^fas merrd ISSN: WWJMS2 




Trade With Devdoping Countries Is Good Business 

X , __ ArnMni’s or Yw 


G 


ENEVA — It is now certain that the 
World Trade Organization will 
come into being, on target, on Jan. 1. 
This historic event is an appropriate oc- 
casion for setting the record straight on a 
misconception that has been put about 
by protectionist opponents of the WTO. 

For someone unfamiliar with the facts, 
the myth that trade with developing 
countries is destroying jobs and depress- 
ing wages in the nch countries can have 
a ring of plausibility. But it cannot sur- 
vive contact with reality. 

Public opinion polls confirm the 
growing sense of insecurity of workers 
throughout the developed world, fueled 
by a seemingly endless flow of reports of 
downsizing of major corporations, down- 
ward pressure on wages and, especially in 
Western Europe, chronically high levels 
of unemploymenL These rears are the 
focus of a considerable amount of seri- 
ous research, which suggests that labor 
market rigidities and government regu- 
lation are the major culprits. 

Unfortunately, job fears are being 
played on by a min ority who claim that 
competition from developing countries is 
to blame. The fall of communism and the 
move to more market-oriented econo- 
mies, they argue, has brought 4 billion 
low-wage workers into the world economy 
for thefirst time in the postwar era. Free 
trade with those countries, they say, is 
bound to result either in a massive transfer 
of jobs out of the rich countries or in a 
decline of rich-country wages to the levels 
found in tlx: developing countries. 

Since either option will lead to sotial 
upheaval and conflict, the rich countries 
are said to have no choice but to carefully 
regulate their trade with the low-wage 
countries. Variously GATT, the WTO 
and the Uruguay Round are condemned 


Any policy which restricts 
imports from developing 
countries heritably ends up 
restricting exports to those 
countries. If they can’t 
sell 9 iheycanftbuy. 


for promoting free trade and blocking 
efforts to raise barriers to imports from 
developing countries. 

Advocates of this view offer anecdotal 
evidence but shy away from a more com- 
prehensive “testing” of it against real 
world experience. This is not surprising, 
since the facts contradict the picture 
painted by their anecdotal evidence. 

The vast majority of developing coun- 
tries spend every penny of foreign ex- 
change they earn, and then someT They 
have an insatiable appetite for developed 
countries' goods and services. 

If the OECD countries purchase an 
additional $5 billion in clothing from 
developing countries, the devdoping 


By Peter D. Sutherland 

The writer is director-general <4 GA TT. 

countries will increase their imports by 
$5 billion, with most of it spent directly 
on OECD exports and the remainder 
coming back indirectly — for example, 
Brazil uses Deutsche marks to import 
from Mexico, and Mexico uses the marks 
to import from the European Union. 

Over time, dynamic exporters are also 
dynamic importers. For example, where- 
as in 1980 China ranked 29th and 2Isl, 
respectively, on the lists of the world’s 
l eading merchandise exporters and im- 
porters, by last year it had moved up to 
be the 1 1th largest exporter and the 11th 
largest importer. 

The experience of the other dynamic 
exporters matches China’s; their 1993 
rankings on the export and import Hsts 
are virtually identical This means that 
any policy which restricts imports from 
developing countries inevitably ends up 
restricting exports to those countries. If 
they can’t sell they can’t buy. 

Thus trade with devdoping countries 
is more about job creation than about 
job losses. Trade creates jobs in the 
developed countries’ export sector and, 
via the income gains , throughout the 
economy as a whole. 

While some job creation offsets job 
losses that occur as a result of structural 
nhangp and technological development, 
it is the net impact on incomes that is 
most significant This is because jobs in 
the export sector pay more on average 
than jobs in the ineff icient import-com- 
peting sector (17 percent more in the 
United States, according to recent esti- 
mates). since on average they are higher- 
skill jobs. In this way, trade with low- 
wage countries adds to the supply of 
higher-paying jobs. 

Trade with devdoping countries is also 
beneficial in the short run, as it was last 
year when it helped sustain the exports of 
the European Union and the United 
Slates. In each case, exports to Latin 
America and developing countries in 
Asia offset the weak or declining de- 
mand for imports into Japan and within 
the European Union. Developing coun- 
tries' import demand helped keep fac- 
tories open and prevented longer jobless 
queues in the rich countries. 

Comparing hourly wages in a rich 
country with those in developing coun- 
tries is meaningless as far as competitive- 
ness is concerned. (If the hourly wage 
were all that mattered, it would be im- 
possible to explain why developing coun- 
tries purchase two- thirds of their mer- 
chandise imports from the high-wage 
developed countries.) At a minimum, it is 
necessary to adjust for differences in la- 
bor productivity, which is much higher in 
the developed countries because their 
workers are more skilled and have more 
capital to work with. 

Nor is labor cost per unit of output 
necessarily a deciding factor, except per- 
haps for some firms whose production 


uses large amounts of sStSurafsSesmencrt much af? 

fec^bytbe.higfSb^eraondo^ 

workers with the necessary range of wUs 
can be as important, or more so, in deem- 
ing where to produce. 

Some allege that lotaga direct invest- 
ment (FDI) by develpped^entiyfirms 
causes large-scale shifts of production 




causes large-scale 
and employment from rich countries to 
developing countries. The facts indicate 
otherwise. The developed countries m- 


annnal cost of protecting ajot 

barriers is typically anywhere from_ 
to eight times the annual wage of that 
job what the advocates of increased 
production fail to explain is how a soci- 
ety makes itself richer by meaning annu- 
al costs dial are a large multiple of the 


more than cat illusion of 


ma 


was. 


vast mainl y in each other (again giving lie 
to the rfaim that only hourly wages mat- 
ter). Moreover, by reinforcing competi- 
tiveness, FDI can protect existing pro- 
duction capacity which otherwise may 
have disappeared, and frequently results 
in increased demand for capital goods, 
components, services and so forth from 
other home country suppliers. 

Even if one believed that trade with 
developing countries was an important 
source of downward pressure on the 
wages of unskilled workers in the rich 
countries, would it make sense to try to 
use a country’s trade policies to protect 
the wages and jobs of unskilled workers? 
Consider one of the implications of such 
a course of action. 

Low-paying jobs in the import-com- 
peting sector would be protected at the 
expense of higher-paying jobs in the ex- 
port sector. In the medium term, such a 
policy would be certain to reduce the 
number of young people staying in 
school and acquiring more skills. Why 
stay in school if the govern m ent has a 
policy of encouraging low-skill jobs and 
discouraging the creation of higher-skill 
jobs? This is a prescription for economic 
stagnation or worse. 

While the low-paying jobs would be 
protected against competition from de- 
veloping countries, they would not be 
protected against technological change, 
which many argue is a more important 
source of downward pressure on unskilled 
wages. (The kind of routine jobs done by 
unskilled workers are often easiest to auto- 
mate) Protection against imports may 
actually speed up the rate of job loss, as 
firms use the windfall profits from higher 
prices to accelerate the introduction erf 
labor-saving capital eqaipmenL 

Protection leads to higher prices for 
consumers, and in most instances the 
added costs fall heavily on low-income 
families because they spend a larger 
share of their budgets on such products 
as clothing and footwear where devel- 
oping countries are very competitive. In 
general, the low-wage countries tend to 
produce the medium-to-lower-quality 
consumer goods that low-income fam- 


Contrary to the arguments of protec- 
tionists, higher trade baraws would 
make it more difficult for the developed 
countries to maintain generous health, 
unemployment and pension boKnts. 
Generous social provisions are expen- 
sive; and the best way —indeed, the only 

■way —to ensure that a society can afford 
them is to put primary e mph a s is on using 
its resources efficiently, creating incen- 
tives for its labor force to acquire more 
drills and creating opportunities for its 
export-oriented sectors to expand. 

So, protectionism does not create 
jobs. It doesn’t even succeed in main- 
taming them- The problem is that pro- 
tectionists are more interested in popu- 
list slogans than in reality. 

Protectionism is at heart a tactic -for 
denying reality. In particular, it tries to 
suppress the reality of change —in the 
economy as a whole, in industry, in social 
conditions — ynd by doing so ensures 
that rfiang a, when it inevitably comes, is 
a lot more painful since people have not 
been prepared for h. 

There may wdl be 4 billion currently 
low-wage workers entering an increas- 
ingly global economy, but they are not a 
threat. Rather they are the next genera- 
tion of consumers for the advanced in- 
dnstrial economies. 

Pro tecti onists offer the public nothing 
more than an illusion — an illusion of time > 
standing still in a golden age that never 
was. The rea&ty behind it is the continued 
impoverishment of devdoping countries 
and transition, economies whose hopes 
for growth rest cm trade, and on whose 
h depend the industrialized world’s 
i for its own prosperity. 
ft should never forget that the last 
time protectionist policies had the upper 
hand in the Northern Hemisphere was in 
the 1930s. The result is a matter of his- 
torical and horrible record. . . 

The WTO won’t be a oncesamd-for-all 
answer to protectionists. They will no 
doubt always find an audience, like other 
peddlers erf quack remedies, wherever 
there is fear. Bat it can make an mannous 
contribution toward removing the causes 
of those fears and so toward deriving the 
protectionist vims of a host body. 

This is why it is so crucially important 
that governments and people everywhere 
give their active support to the organiza- 
tion, not just for itsdf but for what it 
m eans : a world trading system based on 
equity, openness and cooperation rather 
than suicidal selfishness. 

International Herald Tribune. 


UN Foot-Dragging Could Make a Sham of the War Crimes Tribunal 


W ASHINGTON — Last 
month Justice Richard 
Goldstone of South Africa, chief 
prosecutor of the first interna- 
tional war crimes tribunal since 
Nuremberg and Tokyo, laid out 
before three judges of the Inter- 
national Criminal Tribunal for 
the Fonner Yugoslavia the case 
against the first of those to be 
held responsible for murders, tor- 
tures, rapes and other crimes 
known by the chilling phrase 
“ethnic cleansing.” The judges' 
have already issued one indict- 
ment; more are forthcoming. 

But die success or failure of the 
international community’s first 
effort since World War II to hold 
individuals accountable for geno- 
cide, “crimes against humanity” 


By Thomas S. Warrick 


and war crimes may not be deter- 
mined by Justice Gladstone's pro- 
secutors and investigators, nor by 
the 11 judges who will hear the 
evidence assembled by his team 
and by the UN Commission of 
Experts headed by the American 
law professor Cberif Bassiounj. 

Rather, the fate of the first ef- 
fort in almost 50 years to put 
teeth into international law will 
likely; be determined this week by 
two little- known UN committees, 
the Advisory Committee on Ad- 
ministrative and Budgetary Ques- 
tions (ACABQ) and the Fifth 
Committee of the General As- 
sembly. These panels control the 
purse strings of the United Na- 


tions, which means that they will 
decide whether those ultimately 
responsible for ethnic cleansing 
are ever to be brought to justice. 

These war crimes cases will be 
witness-driven. There is no paper 
trail — at least, not yet Justice 
Goldstone’ s investigators will 
have to interview as many wit- 
nesses as possible to find those 
willing to testify. 

To prosecute a camp com- 
mander for crimes against hu- 
manity may take the court testi- 
mony of 50 witnesses. To prove 
that there was a policy of system- 
atic rape — and there was — will 
require hundreds of witnesses 
who now live all over Europe. 


Somebody Has to Say These Things 


R ockville, Maryland — 

.Franklin D. Roosevelt re- 
marked that a society can be 
gauged by bow well it treats its 
poorest members. Since I be- 
came surgeon general of the 
United Suites Public Health 
Service — the world’s largest 
group of expertly trained public 
health professionals — I have 
worked hard to follow the tradi- 
tion of this office by speaking 
out about the hard choices we 
all face in taking care of those 
who do not have anyone to take 
care of them. 

Indeed, even acknowledging 
the existence of such people is 
proving difficult for many. 

Our country is engaged in a 
wrenching debate about who we 
are, where we are going, what 
we believe in. and the role of 
government in keeping our na- 
tion healthy. Our streets and jails 
are teeming with children and 
young people nobody wants. The 
rates of sexually transmitted dis- 
eases continue growing. 

As parents, teachers and lead- 
ers, we cannot stand by and let 
our children slip away because of 
ignorance or a failure of courage. 
This means telling the truth to 
our young people about the risks 
of their behavior and giving them 
ways to reduce these risks. 

Many tough and complex 
public health issues involve some 
of the most private aspects of 
life. As surgeon general C. Ever- 
ett Koop was one of the first to 
sound the alarm with frank talk 
about the dangers of sexually 
transmitted diseases and ways 
to prevent them. His successor, 
Antonia NoveUo, did so, too. 

1 regret that some or the 
words 1 have uttered about 


By Joycelyn Elders 

The writer resigned as U.S. 

surgeon general on Dec. P. 

these and other matters have 
caused discomfort. Bui 1 regret 
even more the realities that 
they describe. 

Sexual practices are. of 
course, best left lo consenting 
adults, behind closed doors. But 
sex becomes a proper subject 
for government when sexual be- 
havior endangers public health, 
as is clearly the case with AIDS 
and other diseases, or leads to 
increased poverty, ignorance and 
enslavement, as is the case with 
unplanned, unwanted children. 

While abstinence is always to 
be urged on young people — and 
I have so urged repeatedly — 
some of them are far from absti- 
nent. And when they do not 
have the support system that 
families can provide, they need 
to be given information about 
how to protect themselves. 

Nearly half of all poor chil- 
dren in the United Slates do not 
grow up in a conventional fam- 
ily, ana incomes of single-parent 
households are one-third those 
of other households. So local 
communities, local governments 
and school systems often have 
□o choice but to end up playing 
the role of surrogate parent. 

It is always easier to stay on 
the sidelines and let others make 
things happen. This acquies- 
cence allows unhealthy and risky 
lifestyles like these to set the 
pace of our society: 

• Nearly 30 percent of 
Americans under the age of 20 
smoke cigarettes, and the aver- 
age age for first use of ciga- 


rettes is 11.5 years. Since lasL 
month's elections, tobacco 
companies are salivating at the 
thought of improved market- 
ing conditions. 

• About half of 18-10-20- 
year -olds have used alcohol in 
the past month, and binge 
drinking has become a common 
form of recreation for young 
people in high school and col- 
lege. Yet more than a third of 
primary and secondary schools 
provide no alcohol or drug edu- 
cation. and only nine states re- 
quire health education. 

• Fewer and fewer teenagers 
abstain from sexual intercourse, 
while more and more politicians 
abstain from the debate about 
comprehensive health education. 
And fewer than half of sexually 
active teenagers used a condom 
in their last sexual encounter. 

• About 40 percent of preg- 
nant minority women do not 
receive any prenatal care in 
their first trimester. 

Change demands active in- 
volvement; sometimes one per- 
son with courage can make a 
majority. “The day we see the 
truth and cease to speak," said 
Martin Luther King Jr., “is the 
day we begin to die." 

As I leave public life, I will 
continue to be a voice for the 
poor and the powerless and to do 
ray best to see that the goals of 
this administration arc niched 
to make the worid a better place 
for all God’s children. 


Joycelyn Elders is returning 
to the University of Arkansas 
School of Medicine, where she 
was professor of pediatrics for 26 
years. She contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


Some of the best evidence will 
come from forensic experts’ exhu- 
mation. of mass graves, such as 
the one near Vukovar, Croatia, 
where 200 Croats were taken 
from a hospital massacred and 
dumped in a shallow grave. 

The initial budget for the' war 
crimes tribunal was a scandal Of 
the S3 2.6 million the tribunal was 
supposed to get for 1994-1995, 
$22.6 million was for judges, ad- 
ministration and overhead. Some 
$8.1 million was for prosecutors' 
and investigators’ salaries, and 
$1.4 million for the defense. 

For the real expenses of investi- 
gations — travel for investigators, 
translators so that investigators 
could talk to witnesses, witnesses’ 
travel and security, forensic and 
medical experts, mass grave exhu- 
mations and postmortems, trans- 
portation of suspects to trial 
tracking 10.000 pages a month 
coming in from refugee interviews, 
investigating new war crimes, and 
investigations into the destruc- 
tion of cultural landmarks — the 
budget was a mere $562,300. 

As little as this was, the 
ACABQ and the Fifth Commit- 
tee cut it by 20 percent for 1994, 
allowing nothing for 1995 and 
claiming that the UN Office of 
Legal Affairs had not justified 
even what was proposed. 

Even with $3 million and the 
loan of 22 prosecutors and investi- 
gators from the United States, and 
the support of a few other, mostly 
non- European countries, investi- 
gations have been slow to get up to 
speed for a lack of money. 

When I was in The Hague in 
July. 20 assistant prosecutors and 


investigators had to share a single 
telephone that could call outside 
the Netherlands. (Most of the 
witnesses are in Germany, Aus- 
tria, Denmark and the fonner 

*Jhstice Goldstone came on the 
job in August, and the im 
tors he has are now in the fic 
More are urgently needed. For 
1995, he has asked the UN com- 
mittees for SII5 million. The 
Iran-contra investigation, which 
tried only about a dozen readily 
identified UJS. political figures, 
cost more than $40 million. 

There have been many serious 
allegations that the United Na- 
tions is dragging its feet on war 
crimes investigations. Sadruddin 
Aga Khan, farmer UN high com- 
missioner for refugees, warned in 
The New York Times last Febru- 
ary that the teeth were being 
pulled from the tribunal and 
“only a facade will r emain ” 

When Frits Kalshoven, the 
first chairman of the commission 
of experts for Yugoslavia, re- 
signed, he told Renters that 
“problems with the UN bureau- 
cracy” made the United Nations 
slow to release resources needed 
for investigations. 

The United Nations should give 
the tribunal the resources it needs 
to succeed. The credibility of inter- 
national justice is on the line. 

The miter, a Wash ington lawyer, 
was senior counsel to the chairman 
of the UN Commission of Experts 
on the Former Yugoslavia, an inves- 

ofwar crimes. Be contributed this 
comment to The Washington Post 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Is Stevenson Alive? 


LONDON — The question 
which is now agitating the minds 
of the general reading public is: 

^ tcv S s0 V)‘f d hunying pedestrian is amazedto 
notr The Evenmg Standard says: find that hehas made hKonev 
^he relatives of Mr. R,L Steven- Kteraiiv ;* *» Jounic ^ 


the stopping of all the automati- 
cally controlled pneumatic clocks 
in Paris offices and at prominent 
street comers, because of insuffi- 
cient coal with the result that the 


son are still of the opinion that he 
is alive. Mr. Stevenson’s wife was 
suffering from what was believed 
to be an intia cranial aneurism. 
The death described in the tele* 
gram from Auckland is precisely 
indicative of a ruptured iatra cra- 
nia 1 aneurism, and the person real- 
ly dead may be the novelist's wife, 
and Mr. Stevenson may yet be able 
to read his own obituary notices." 

1919s No Time in Paris 

PARIS — There should be a 
considerable demand for cheap 
wnst-waiches if the coal shortage 
continues. The latest phase of 
"peace time conditions" has been 


literally in “no time’ 

1944: German Gains 

SUPREME HEADQUAR- 
TERS, Allied Expeditionary 
Forces, Fans — (From our New 
York edition;] As protests 
poured in from almost all the 
Allied world over the suppres- 
sion of news of German on 
the western front, supreme head- 
quarters pulled the curtain aside 
partly and promised a bigger 
new of tite situation. The posi- 
tions of tiie German and Allied 
armies will be made public once 
daily, after a sufficient time-lag 
to make sure the enemy will reap 
no benefit from the information. 


T 


■ nw » wr Ji i rw— 1 - 5— -„n, , I n n 


• r ~ •-.* 


rim* 








[ sin € . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 21, 1994 


opinion 


The Chechens and Russia: A Hatred as Old as the Land 


"VV / Ru^ s 1 ia‘Pran! N “ ^asperated about 
lance, a senior SSSf to . crush Chechen resis- 
311 urgent memr» USSI ? n ^ ureaucrat addressed 
'This couH !? OTa i? dum IO w s superiors. 
Red Atov Iasi week, as the 

Caucasian nai?« ke ?»* C 0n Y* obs tinate nr*rth 

^mperer NSS' ““ ‘ hC * Umxe 

servam ■? eC ^'~ wote the Russian civil 
in° their **? P* und eruig and ruid- 

ferocirv ne r>r?° rS ' wi ?° ha,e them for *heir 
ihev a™',V ° flen punched by Russian arms. 
aMin* 6 3 Th yS 7^31 lo be i n dieir crimes 
i 0n i y wav 10 deal wlh this ill- 
last U ° n -n!- peop . e ** lo d «troy it to the 
their'rV.'rai S w 1 ? uId not be difficult, because 

haw greatly diminished.*’ 
ihSjSjSf* 1 , * he V ha d. in no small measure 
lo { ¥ hrelcss efforts of four Russian 
gZEFtLJ^JPI days of Catherine the 
hluenrin?? ush Nicholas never approved the 
bluepnm for a final solution** of the Che- 

rwi? UeSUpn ' he Proceeded to drown the 
L regJOn blood and carnage. 

, , e Chechens were crushed, their land was 
damned, their yurts, or villages, leveled and 
QCtny two-thirds of their population was left 
aeaa. Many others were driven into exile in 
uk Ottoman -controlled Middle East, where 
thm descendants live to this day. 

Those left behind grew accustomed to 
gross mistreatment by whoever happened to 
occupy the Russian throne, be it a Romanov 
czar, a Bolshevik secretary-general or a dem- 
ocratically elected president. 

Few people on the Russian land mass 
or anywhere else, for that matter 


By Yo’av Karov 


— have been victimized more often. 

In the winter of 1944, when Hitler was busy 
shipping Jews in cattle cars to Auschwitz. 
Stalin applied the same method to the Che- 
chens: He ordered the overnight deportation 
of the entire population to the steppes of 
Kazakhstan and Siberia. They were accused, 
along wiLb other Muslim nations, of fictitious 
collective collaboration with the Nazis. 

The nominally autonomous Chechen re- 
gion was dismantled, and the spoils were 
divided among Russians. Ossetians and 
Georgians, all of them Christian. Soviet 
geographers were ordered to erase from 
the map any reminder that this ancient 
nation ever existed. 

The Chechens, and their ethnic brethren, 
the Ingush, were meant to die. One-third did.. 
Those who did not owed much of their sur- 
vival to their resilience, embodied in a mysti- 
cal brand of Islam called Sufism. 

Sufism, often derided by Russia as “Islamic 
fundamentalism,'' has been the Chechen ulti- 
mate weapon. It combines the militant, purist 
notion of an Islamic lifestyle, a message of 
defiance in the face of adversity and an ex- 
traordinary formula for internalizing one's 
rage. Central lo Muslim practice in Chechnya 
is an ecstatic dance called zikr. taught nearly 
ISO years ago by Kunta Haji. an illiterate 
shepherd who experienced a mystical revela- 
tion “on the road to Baghdad.” 

Kunta Zikr is credited with helping the 
Chechen close their ranks, even at limes of 
overwhelming defeat. Men of all ages would 
gather in public, form circles, chant prayers. 


jump and shake their heads and arms. They 
would beseech God and his prophets to for- 
give their numerous sins and purify them. 
Emerging from a trance of an hour or more, 
they would find catharsis — sometimes weep- 
ing or even losing consciousness. 

imperial Russia, having just overcome the 
Chechen combat skills in battle, was terrified 
by the nonviolent, self -oriented zikr. In 1864, 
Kunta Haji was committed to a mental asy- 
lum. Zikr was outlawed: performing it became 
a capita] offense. Kunta Haji’s followers were 
massacred or banished to Siberia. 

But the Chechens’ saga of resistance was 
far from over, in 1877 they rose up in arms. 
In the early 20th century," they were briefly 
seduced by Lenin, whose emissaries sought 
to convert the socially egalitarian Chechens 
to communism, but eventually revolted 
against Bolshevism in 1920 and gave the Red 
Army a bloody nose. They rebelled again in 
1929 and in 1940. Throughout, the Chechens 
managed to preserve not only their tradition- 
al clan system but their religious structure. 
Soviet and post-Soviet experts have greatly 
underestimated this phenomenon. 

Stalin’s 1944 deportation was reversed in 
1957, but at no point did his successors see fit 
to offer an apology, let alone indemnities. 
The outside world knew little of the plight of 
this isolated nation. 

Through the '70s. the Soviet government 
was to treat Grozny, the capital of Chechnya, 
as enemy territory, where nighttime curfews 
were imposed as a matter of routine. 

Outright hatred of all matters Chechen are 
common to Russians, be they narrow-minded 
nationalists or ostensibly tolerant liberals. 
Many who threw in their lot with the indepen- 


dence-craving Baltic states are disdainful of 
equally independence-craving Chechens. 

In three weeks of traveling across Chech- 
nya. I came across few Chechens who op- 
posed their nation's independence. Many 
who vociferously objected to the present 
leader. Dzhokar "Dudayev, still insisted that 
independence was not a plank in somebody's 
party platform, but a tenet of faith. 

Nlr. Dudayev, a retired Soviet general, 
proved to be too narcissistic, too tempera- 
mental and at times unnecessarily provoca- 
tive. He evoked too often the historical figure 
of Sheikh Mansour. the heroic leader of 
Chechnya's first rebellion against Russia 
two centuries ago. In doing so. and in dealing 
brutally with tus political rivals, he made it 
much easier for Moscow to demonize him. 
Even worse, he played into the hands of 
proponents of racist stereotypes, already 
prevalent in Russian society. 

Chechen prominence in Russian orga- 
nized crime (talking of the "Chechen mafia” 
is how Russians give themselves a good chill 
on a hot day) allowed Moscow to portray 
Mr. Dudayev- as a Caucasian Godfather. 

Russian ministers talk of Chechnya’s trans- 
formation into a “free crime zone." Yet Russia 
has not hesitated to employ the good offices of 
convicted assassins and well-known crime 
bosses in trying to undermine Mr. Dudayev. 
.All along. Russia has failed to recognize the 
roots of the Chechen conflict: its own mis- 
treatment of the Chechens. 


Mr. Kamy. an Israeli journalist, recently 
spent three months in the Caucasus and is 
writing a book about the region. He contribut- 
ed this comment id The Washington Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Bosnia Needs the UN 


In the view of Refugees Interna- 
tional, the UN Protection Force 
should remain in Bosnia — and be 
strengthened — to assist in the de- 
livery of essential humanitarian re- 
lief supplies to Bosnians this winter. 

The UN presence seems essential 
for assuring that the airlift to Saraje- 
vo and the overland convoys to oth- 
er parts of Bosnia continue to oper- 
ate. The UN forces are a modest 
check on the Bosnian Serbs and a 
reminder to them that the world 
continues to have an interest in the 
welfare of the Bosnian people. 

Unprofor should be withdrawn 
from Bosnia only in the context of a 
comprehensive strategy to stop, the 
Bosnian Serbs’ aggression against 
what r emains of Bosnia. 

Should the United Nations and 
NATO agree to a campaign of air 
strikes to enforce the flight-exclu- 
sion zone over Bosnia and to protect 
UN-designated safe areas, Unpro- 
for might have to be withdrawn or 


redeployed, along with Bosnian ci- 
vilians in highly exposed areas, 
under NATO air cover. 

However, if we are not prepared 
to take this forthright step. UN 
peacekeeping forces should remain 
in Bosnia. We should not further 
abandon Bosnian civilians to the 
tender mercies of the Bosnian Serbs. 


Clin ton; Passing Judgment 


LIONEL ROSENBLATT. 
President- Refugees International. 

Washington. 


On Bosnia, With Thanks 


Every foreign leader with whom 
the United Slates is involved for 
global progress praises Bill Clinton's 
intelligent and forthright statesman- 
ship. Why can't Americans judge him 
by his accomplishments, of which 
they should be proud, rather than his 
flaws, which seem in no way to ham- 
per his international championing of 
their best interests? (Could they sur- 
vive living in the glass house that is 
the While House?) 


Many thanks lo Anthony Lewis. 
William Pfaff and William Safire for 
various columns on Bosnia, as well 
as to Adrian Hastings, Norman 
Slone, Mark Almond, Noel Mal- 
colih and Branka Magas, for “On 
Bosnia. Washington Should Slop 
Deferring to London and Paris” 


ALAN DAVID SHEAN. 
Dun. France. 


President Bill Clinton is a hypo- 
critical opportunist. 

OLGA PICUR1. 
Zurich. 


( Opinion, Nov. 29). Their words are a 
relief to all those who are still able to 


Doll Men in a Turmoil 


relief to all those who are still able to 
think. Please do not stop. 

CHIARELLA WINTER . 

Paris. 


Some time ago, our group. The 
Dull Men’s Club (Motto: “Out of it 
and proud of it”), suffered in silence 
the sudden departure of Dr. Rex 


Morgan from the pages of your jour- 
nal. We have continued lo purchase 
the IHT each Tuesday so we can 
wallow in the sublime slodginess of 
Mr. Byrne’s chess column. Indeed, 
in my capacity as Keeper of the 
Archives, my principal task is to 
knife out the chess column and cata- 
logue same. The stolid inertia and 
clotted monotony which character- 
ize Mr. Byme's commentary is 
something that we cherish, admiring 
as we do systematic schemes and 
consistent regimentation. 

Close scrutiny of our archives for 
the last decade reveals only eight 
occasions on which Mr. Byrne Has 
deviated from his familiar, formula- 
ic final line: ”... and black [or 
white] gave up.” Those eight devi- 
ations are entirely acceptable, for 
they involve no more than the addi- 
tion or deletion of an article or con- 
junction. We do not begrudge Mr. 
Byrne his rare flights into literary 
sensationalism; nobody is perfect. 

We note with no modest amount 
of unsettling trepidation, even 


alarm, the column of Nov. 29. which 
concludes “. . . there would have 
been no way to put the Humpty- 
Dumpty of the black position togeth- 
er.” Such spirited pretensions cannot 
possibly be the work of Mr. Byrne; 
we suspect that some anarchistic 
staffer has tampered with the original 
text. The Dull Men's Club would 
greatly appreciate editorial efforts to 
preclude another such misadventure. 

ROGER KNOEfiBER. 

Paris. 


Miraculous Descendance 


Page 5 


The Millennium Is Near — 
Nearer Than You Think 


Bv Wick Allison 


L ARCHMONT. New York — 
/ Mavbe we should deck the halls 


with a few more boughs of holly. 
From the best evidence, it appears 
that Jesus Christ was bom in 6 B.C. 

If a Roman monk hadn't made a 
simple miscalculation 1.400 years 
ago. the world would be celebrating 
the 2.000th Christmas on Sunday. 


MEANWHILE 


Regarding an item in the People 
column (Nov. 29} on “descendants" of 
Sir Isaac Nekton: 

Since Sir Isaac Newton was never 
married, nor, as far as anyone 
knows, did he father any children 
out of wedlock, how could his de- 
scendants have come down? Gravity 
isn’t the answer to everything. 

NORMAN SANDERS. 

Dram men. Norway. 


And the Sunday after that, we would 
be celebrating New Year’s Day 2000. 

How did the mistake happen? It 
started with an attempt to fix the 
date not of Christmas but of Easter. 

Easter, like Passover, is based on 
a calculation involving the lunar and 
solar calendars. The calculation can 
be done any number of ways, and by 
the 6th century A.D., differences 
abounded. Finally, in 525, Pope 
John I commissioned a well-regard- 
ed scholar, the monk Dionysius Ex- 
iguus. to develop a system that ev- 
eryone could agree on. 

Dionysius was an expen not only 
in canon law but in astronomy and 
mathematics, and he had no trouble 
coming up with new tables for Eas- 
ter. The hard part was getting bish- 
ops to adopt them. 

It may have been to popularize his 
system that he hit on another bright 
idea: renumbering the years to focus 
on the binh of Christ. 

Most of Europe then' still operat- 
ed under Emperor Diocletian's ver- 
sion of the old Roman calendar, 
which dated the years ab urbe condi- 
ta — from the founding of the city. . 

Diocletian had been one of the 
church's fiercest persecutors, argued 
the monk, so why rely on him for its 
system of dating? And which was 
more important — the founding of a 
collapsed empire or the incarnation 
of Jesus Christ, savior of the world? 

Dionysius designated the first 
year after Christ's birth as anno Do- 
mini (year of oiir Lord) 1. Jesus's 
birth, then, took place late in the 
year before that: not 0. but I B.C. 

Dionysius’s theology' may have 
been on the mark, but his chronolo- 
gy wasn't. Somehow he decided to 
place Jesus's birth in the 753d year 
of the old Roman calendar. Chris- 
tian scholars have long questioned 
this reckoning, and for good reason. 

Herod the Great. King of Judea, 
died in the 750th year after Rome 
was founded. .As we know from the 
Gospels of both MatLhew and Luke. 
Jesus was bom in Herod's reign. So 
Dionysius was at least three years off 
— and the evidence tilts lo five. 

In Matthew's account, Herod in- 


terrogates the magi who come to 
visit Jesus, and after establishing 
the date of the child's birth, 
he orders the killing of all the 
male children of Bethlehem aged 
2 and under. Joseph is warned 
by an angel lo flee to Egypt; he 
returns with the holy family only 
after Herod dies. 

Contrary to conventional piety — 
and millions of creches — the magi 
were not at the manger on Christ- 
mas night — or even Epiphany (Jan. 
6), when their arrival is celebrated. 
Matthew indicates that their jour- 
ney took months, not days. 

By the time they arrived and lin- 
gered in Jerusalem, consulted with 
Herod and moved on to Bethlehem 
lo worship the child, more lime 
would have passed. Jesus would no 
longer have been a newborn. 

By the time the holy family fled to 
Egypt, lived there, then returned at 
Herod’s death in 4 B.C., he would 
have been as old as a year or two. 
That places his binh before 5 B.C. 

Luke doesn't mention the magi. 
His only reference to a historical 
date is a census that was taken 
“while Quirinius was governor of 
Syria.” That can't be right, since 
Quirinius became legate in Syria in 
A.D. 6 — by which time Herod had 
been dead for 10 years. 

But Roman records tell us a Quin- 
tilius was legale in Syria from 6 B.C. 
to 4 B.C. Did Luke — writing some 
70 years after the event — get the 
name wrong? It’s not unusual, even 
in the Gospels. 

Placing the birth before 5 B.C.. 
yet during the time of Quimilius. 
would mean that Jesus was bom 
in 6 B.C. 

The magi, of course, were follow- 
ing a star. Of the many attempts that 
have been made to identify it, one is 
especially intriguing.' Chinese as- 
tronomers recorded what must have 
been a supernova in the early spring 
of 5 B.C. If, as Matthew says, the 
magi began their journey after Jesus 
was bom, this would suggest a birth 
date in the winter of 6-5 B.C. — 
around, say, Christmas? 

Every Christmas is special, and 
the Christmas message is timeless 
whether one accepts the Gospels lit- 
erally or figuratively. 

But it may add a glow to a cold, 
crisp night in December 1994 to 
know that this is the 2,000th Christ- 
mas to warm the human heart. 


The writer, former publisher of Na- 
tional Review, is author of “ That’s in 
the Bible?” a study guide for adults. 
He contributed this comment lo The 
New York Times. 


•* v ~ N 



>r..-v + 


^tiNlQUE 


PARIS - LONDON - NEW. YORK - GENEVA - MILAN - MUNICH - HONG KONG - TOKYO 


and one hundred and forty Cartier stores in major (dries worldwide. 


Dm Atakwonkr 


Kay Delaney in New York 1-212-852-6956 
pavid Levy in New fork 1-212-852-6912 
Eric Clemcnciaii in Paris 33-1-44-95-15-80 


Nan Richards in London 44-7I-29Q-8QQ0 
Lynne KraseLsky in Hons Kon " S52-826-4525 
Nobl Hashimolo in Tokyo SI -3-5466-1 56 1 


ElQOAl S ft 1 1 1 1 1 T t H! IWBBK 


• EMI IIIEAII 


why News 


Travels Fast 


With 29 bureaus tracking the news 
plus satellite coverage that spans the globe, 
CNN sets the standard for immediate, credible 
and comprehensive reporting around the world. 


NTERNATIONAL. 


for information regarding advertising opportunities, please contact 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1994 



Plutonium Surplus: 
Bury or Bum Up? 

U.S. Disposal Team Rules Out 
All but Variants of 2 Methods 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — As the 
U.S. stockpile of toxic bomb- 
grade surplus plutonium con- 
tinues to grow, a Clinton ad- 
ministration team searching for 
a way to dispose of the material 
has effectively eliminated most 
proposals as economically or 
politically unacceptable. That 
leaves only two or three realistic 
options, none of them cheap or 
easy. 

All of the exotic disposal 
methods proposed in the past, 
such as sending the plutonium 
into space to be incinerated by 
the sun or burying ii in the 
seabed, have been screened out, 
according to team members. 
Still on the table are variants of 
two basic choices: burning the 
plutonium as fuel in nuclear re- 
actors or burying it deep in the 
Earth. 

The timetable calls for a deci- 
sion in 13 months on a disposal 
method that will have to meet 
challenging criteria: It must be 
safe, environmentally and polit- 
ically feasible, secure from ter- 
rorists, acceptable to Russia 
and affordable, and it must not 
contradict U.S. policy on nucle- 
ar nonproliferation. 

"At this time, the US. gov- 
ernment has just begun to con- 
sider all of these possibilities 
and their potential implica- 
tions,'* said Frank vonHippel, 
assistant director of the White 
House science office and co- 
chairman of the interagency 
group studying the problem. 

As the Cold War fades into 
the past, Lhe United States is 
disassembling about 1,400 nu- 
clear warheads a year. In the 
past plutonium from retired 
warheads was reused in new 
weapons. But now Lhe govern- 
ment is not m akin g new weap- 
ons. so the plutonium is piling 
up, mostly in temporary storage 
facilities at an Energy Depart- 
ment site near Amarillo, Texas. 

Plutonium is highly toxic, 
flammable in some forms and 
radioactive. About IS pounds 
(about seven kilograms) can be 
fashioned into a nuclear explo- 
sive device with relative ease. 
Although (he exact amount of 
the stockpile surplus remains 
classified, it widely is reported 
to be about 100 metric tons. 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


A Florida Shopping Mall Santa 
Turns Into Scrooge for 3 Kids 

It was more “Bah, humbug,” than 
“Ho, ho, ho,” when a. surly Santa Claus 
told a 6-year-old boy he was not getting 
any presents and challenged the kid’s 
dad to a fight. 

Chip and Lori Crabtree had brought 
their sons, ages 2, 4 and 6, to a shopping 
mall in Jacksonville, Florida, so the boys 
could tell Santa what they wanted for 
Christmas. Mrs. Crabtree was wearing a 
T-shirt boosting the University of Flori- 
da’s sports teams, the Gators. 

“Santa Claus doesn’t like Gator fans,” 
Mr. Crabtree quoted Santa as saying. 

“Santa Claus wishes that Florida State 
would beat the Gators in the Sugar 
Bowl,” a football game to be played Jan. 

* When the Crabtrees told Santa he was 
being rude, the less-than-jolly old soul 
pushed the 6-year-old off his lap and 
stood up to poke his white-gloved finger 
into Mr. Crabtree’s chest 

“You want to do something about it 
right now, pal?” Santa said, according to 
Mr. Crabtree. “Right here on stage?” 


A report by the National 
Academy of Sciences termed 
the surplus bomb material “a 
clear and present danger to na- 
tional security.” According to 
many officials, the material 
could be stored indefinitely in 
its present form, but doing that 
would require extensive, expen- 
sive security arrangements. 

The leading options still un- 
do 1 active consideration: 

• Placement of plutonium in 
sealed canisters in “boreholes” 
drilled at least two miles (more 
than three kilometers) deep. 

• Conversion into borosili- 
cate glass by mixing the pluto- 
nium with sand and other mate- 
rials and heating it in 
“vitrification” ovens, with the 
glass logs then placed in an un- 
derground repository. 

• Blending the plutonium 
into a mixed oxide fuel that 

commercial nuclear power FORECAST: A Buoyant 1995 Is Predicted 

All these options "look quite ^ , 

feasible technically," Mr. von- Conttaied from l age i 

Hippel said, but each also pre- deficit remains a problem, suggesting that 
sents difficulties. Deep bore- taxes will have to be raised soon after the 
hole storage, for example, presidential election next spring, 
would require finding a ate. #Jhe Ilahan economy will continue to 
Given the intensity of public ^ ^d decline to 2.9 

and congressional opposition to ^ mxnt m 1995 from Us present 3.1 per- 
aay kmd of nuclear wastestor- but ^ country will be threatened by 

^ t deficit as the government is 

to meet its 1995 target for 


Mr. Crabtree demurred, mall security 
jumped in and Santa walked off the job, 
to the dismay of the other children in 
line. 

Mall officials apologized, and said 
they did not know the grumpy Santa’s 
real name. 

Mr. Crabtree said later told his boys 
that had not been the REAL Santa at the 
mail But his 6-year-old already knew: 
“There wasn’t any magic in his eyes.” 


Short Takes 

Members of tbe public can now obtain 
report cards on hospitals. The Joint Com- 
mission on Accreditation of Health Care 
Organizations, a private, nonprofit agen- 
cy founded in 1951 and based in Chica- 
go, accredits most U.S. hospitals after 
thorough inspections. It is paid for by 
the hospital industry and by the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. It has long is- 
sued its finding s only to hospital admin- 
istrators and, in some cases, to federal 
officials. Its reports can determine 
whether a hospital is eligible for taxpayer 
funds, stale licenses and insurance reim- 
bursements. This month, as part of what 
a spokesman called an effort “to provide 
more and more information to the pub- • 
lie,” the agency will start relea sin g re- 
ports of its inspections to anybody who 
asks for them — and is willing to pay $30 
per hospital. 


In Auburn, Washington, a 
victim of muscular dystrophy, Chris Tap- 
pan, 23, started across an isolated rail- 
road crossing in his wheelchair and got 
stuck. Fifteen minutes of effort to get 
unstuck were unavailing. Then a train 
whistled its approach. “I started yelling, 
he recalled. Fortunately, Tom Svend- 
gard, 25, was working nearby and sprint- 
ed to the rescue. “When I got to him, the 
crossing bars came down,” Mr. Svend- 
gard said. He got the wheelchair off the 
tracks with about five seconds to spare. 


Matthew J. Broccoli, a University of 
South Carolina professor who has writ- 
ten or edited 21 books about F. Scott 
Fitzgerald, parted company with the 
Cambridge University Press when, on 
Siting a definitive edition of “The Great 
Gatsby,” he came to Mr. Fitzgerald’s 
description of a billboard face so huge 
“the retinas are one yard high.” Since the 
retinas are the cells at the back of the eye, 
Mr. Fitzgerald obviously meant “pupfls” 
or “irises.” Mr. Bruccou tried to change 
the text, but was overruled. “Editing is 
not rewriting,” he complained in the 
Chronicle of Higher Education. “Editing 
is not desecration. It is an editor's job to 
edit” On the other hand, to this day, 
John Keats, in his poem, “On First 
Looking Into Chapman's Homer,” has 
Cortez rather than Balboa discovering 
the Pacific. 

International Herald Tribune. 


ly to grow at 1 1.5 percent this year ; 
percent in 1995, was overheated. Eff 


age facility, any site proposed is 
certain to set off a political 
storm. 

In addition, this option 
would mean leaving the pluto- 
nium in weapons- usable form 
in temporary storage for all the 
years required to develop the 
boreholes. 

Vitrification would convert 
the plutonium to a form much 
more difficult to recapture for 
use, either by the government or 
by terrorists. But the United 
States does not have an operat- 
ing vitrification plant and, in 
any case; the government has 
no repositoiy site for the radio- 
active glass logs that vitrifica- 
tion would produce. 

That leaves conversion to 
mixed oxide fuel for use as pow- 
er plant fuel, most likely in ex- 
isting U.S. or Canadian reac- 
tors. The problem with this is 
that it conflicts with President 
Bill Clinton's effort to discour- 
age nations such as Russia and 
Japan from using plutonium as 
a co mm ercial fuel. 


and 10 

percent in 1995, was overbeatecL Efforts to 
cool down inflation and the overall econo- 
my, such as increasing interest rates, could 
lead to social unrest, it warned. 

The OECD report said that growth in 
the dynamic Asian economies of Hong 
Kong, South Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, 
ould be nearly 7.6 


likely to fa 
cutting the deficit. 

• The British economy will grow by 3.4 
percent in 1995, but interest rates and 
inflatio n are expected to increase. 

• Mexico, the OECD's newest member, 
should experience growth of more than 4 
percent in both 1995 and 1996, up from 2.9 
percent this year. 

Tu rning to non-OECD members, the 
report said that the Chinese economy, like- 


Taiwan and Thailand wc 
percent this year, declining to a still 
healthy level of 7.2 percent in 1 995 and 6.9 
percent in 1996. 

These countries are benefiting from in- 
tra-regional investment and trade flows, as 
well as strong growth in big Asian econo- 
mies such as China, India and Vietnam, all 
of which are moving toward a more mar- 
ket-oriented economic model. 

In Eastern Europe, the economies of 
Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia 


Projected Growth 




jAfVffay&r - ’ 7 

1994 


1996 l 


3.9 


2.0 •' 


1.0 

2S 

3.4 ■ 


2.8 

. 2. 8 . 

3.5 -i 

Frand? .• 

2.2 


3.2 •: 

fetor , 

22. 


2.9 

‘ : 1 1 ^ J ' 

3.5 

I 3.4 

3.0 : 

£*«*&', ' 

4.1 

•= 4 ±'r. 

3.9 ;= 

Sotifivantf - 




CantrttfAmori e& •' 

4.4 

3 17 

4.2 v 

C 2 »ch ftCBJubifo / 

3.0 

A&U 

5.0 ■_ 

Pol&KS.. . ■ 

4.0 

■54) “ 

5.0 

Slowsjtta- • ••• 

3.5 

•-.4# ■ 

5.0 - 




11.5 9.5 


Source: OECD 


ITALY: The Next Few Days Should Decide Fate of Berlusconi Government 

Continued from Rage 1 


start of a re-election campaign 
as an effort to hold on to power. 

“The election campaign be- 
gins tomorrow,” Mr. Tatarella 
said. 

In a speech in Milan that was 
broadcast on television on 
Monday night, Mr. Berlusconi 
urged his followers to take to 
the streets in a “great march for 


liberty 1 ' if Parliament votes 
a gains t him. 

Italy's crisis has now readied 
the climax of almost three years 
turmoil in which Italians have 
shed their corrupt-stained polit- 
ical old guard and tried in vain 
to find a new way of doing 
political business. 

“We do not consider this cri- 
sis to be like the others,” Mr. 
Ferrara said, referring to the 



WH1 IEmSULL 


Can you imagine . . . 



endless political horse-trading 
that marked postwar Italian 
politics. “There is no longer the 
ability to mediate the way the 
old parties did.” 

Tbe immediate cause of the 
crisis is the decision by the 
Northern League — one of the 
three main elements of the gov- 
ernment along with Mr. Berlus- 
coni's Forza Italia and the neo- 
Fasdst National Alliance — to 
seek new allies on the center- 
right .and the left in an attempt 
to form a new government with- 
out new elections. 

Umberto Bossi, the Northern 
League's tumultuous leader, 
has allied himself with the 
Democratic Party of the Left, 
the former Communists, as well 
as with the Popular Party — 
successor to the now defunct 
Christian Democrats — to mus- 
ter a claimed 325 of the 630 
lower house voles in favor of 
toppling the government. 

It is not clear whether defec- 
tions from Mr. Bossi's ranks 
could yet save the day for Mr. 
Berlusconi. Italian radio said 45 
League deputies had rebelled 
against Mr. Bossi, but many 
Italian analysts say those num- 
bers may not be enough to save 
Mr. Berlusconi. 

Even if Mr. Berlusconi wins 
in the lower bouse, though, it is 
impossible to see how his gov- 
ernment can continue in its pre- 
sent form since the break be- 
tween the two men now seems 
beyond repair. Mr. Berlusconi 


. . . fulfilling your dream ! 


T his yacht the ‘White Gull" went around the 
world departing from Cannes in 1986, across the 
Atlantic to the Caribbean, through the Panama 
Canal, across the Pacific and Indian Oceans and up 
through the Suez Canal back to Cannes. 

During the four years voyage, the owner had the life 
time experience of calling at exotic and beautiful 
places, such as the West Indies, Galapagos, Tahiti, 
numerous pacific atols. New Zealand, Australia 
(the Great Barrier Reef), Bali, Java, Sumatra, 

Sri Lanka, Seychelles, Madagaskar, Comor Islands 
and Kenya. 

All this in the luxury of ‘White Gulls" accommoda- 
tions. And, most important, he was aboard a sailing 
ship which was truly built for such a voyage, never- 
theless maintaining the amenities of a large power 
yacht, cruising four years across all these waters 
without a problem. 

Who has got the money and dreams of such 
a global exploration on the wc rld's best most 
comfortable stay sail schconer, now waiting for 
her new owner? 


T his person has the possibility to acquire ‘White 
Gull", which has been maintained to the hiqhest 
standards and just brought up to top condition under 
the supervision of Veritas with a certificate valid for 
the next 4 years. 

A very extensive inventory of spares is kept aboard. 
Sails can be set and easily handled by one crew 
member only. Always reachable via the most modern 
communication, two independant satellite systems, 
faxes and everything necessary for "White Gull" to 
be used as home or office for private or corporate 
ventures. 

The yacht has never been chartered and has always 
been cherished by the owner. 

All water sports equipment are carried aboard: 
complete diving facilities, a sailing dinghy and 
a catamaran, three tenders and sophisticated big 
game fishing equipment 


CHE PS: Intel to Replace Pentiums 

Continued from Page 1 


LOA : 49 metres 
Beam: 9 metres 
Draft; 4 metres 


Surveyor's appraisal (1993) US$ 12.500.000,- 

Asking price USS 1Q.Q00.000.- 

finandng possibilities are available on request. 


If you are interested, please contact Captain Larry Gprich on board: 
Tel + 33.92.987196 or Fax + 32.89.721913 


designers, scientists, and Wall 
Street program traders who 
make millions of calculations 
daily. 

But the Silicon Valley com- 
pany found itself under siege 
last week when IBM Corp.. an 
Intel customer but also a com- 
peting chip producer, claimed 
the Pentium made more mis- 
takes than Intel had admitted. 

Although computer experts 
said IBM may have stacked its 
own tests of the Pentium to put 
the competing chip in the worst 
light, doubts about the accuracy 
of Intel’s products touched off a 
handful of lawsuits, thousands 
of requests for replacements, 
and public ridicule of Lhe com- 
pany that has tried to establish 
its brand name as a generic 
term like Kleenex or Xerox with 
its campaign of labeling that a 
computer has an “Intel Inside.” 

Reversing his position, An- 
drew Grove, the Czech-born en- 
gineer who has made Intel per- 
haps the world’s most 
innovative chip maker, admit- 
ted he had endured several 
troubled weeks because “what 
we view as an extremely minor 
technical problem has taken on 
a life of its own.” 

He issued a public apology 
and announced a no-queslions- 
asked replacement policy, 
pledging to install the new chips 
at no charge. He said consumer 
complaints tipped the balance 
because of “what they saw as a 
high-handed policy of us decid- 
ing wbo needs a replacement.’' 

Charles Boucher of Ham- 
brecht & Quist. a San Francisco 
firm that specializes in high- 
tech companies, said that Intel 


was an engineering company 
that never had been a consumer 
company until now." 

“Engineers like Andy Grove 
talk their own language, and 
when they have a problem, they 
fax each other about it, fix it, 
and replace it. That isn't always 
the way you deal with the pub- 
lic." 

Indeed, an Intel spokesman 
unconsciously demonstrated 
how far the company still had 
to travel when he conceded 
Tuesday that the past few weeks 
in the company's history had 
bam an “inflection point” — 
using a technical engineering 
term to describe a fundamental 
change. Microsoft did no bet- 
ter; its announcement referred 
to “beta testers," not bothering 
to define them as testers of 
products under development. 


tHT 


will do better than others in 1995, with the 
Polish economy growing by 5 percent, and 
the other two by 4 percent in 1995. 


may be calculating that new 
elections offer his best chance 
of political survivaL 

Mr. Ferrara described new 
elections as “the only way to 
clean the atmosphere" and said 
Mr. Berlusconi would demand 
to stay on as a caretaker until 
elections are held, clearly seek- 
ing to fight a re-election cam- 
paign with all the trappings of 
high office to support him. 

To add to the the complex- 
ities, a victory in the lower , 
house could easily be canceled 
out in the upper house, the Sen- 
ate. where Mr. Berlusconi does 
not have a majority. 

If Mr. Berlusconi fails, he is 
constitutionally obliged to offer 
his resignation to President Os- 
car Luigi Scalfaro. wbo must 
then decide whether to call elec- 
tions. 

Mr. Bossi, however, wants 
Mr. Scalfaro to authorize nego- 
tiations for a government based 
on his new alliance — without 
holding fresh elections in which 
his fortunes would be doubtfuL 

While the crisis plays out, fi- 
nancial markets have fled from 
the spectacle of a country so 
consumed with political insur- 
gency that no one seems to be 
minding the store. The lira fell 
to a record low of 1,050 against 
the Deutsche mark on Tuesday, 
but the government's thoughts 
seemed to be elsewhere. 

“The markets don’t vote,” 
said Mr. Ferrara. 


RUSSIA: 

lightening Noose 

Cbotimed from Page 1. 

Chechnya, which unilaterally 
declared its independence m 
1991. 

On the other side are arrayed 
no more than 13,000 Chechen 
fighters, armed with a motley 
array of weapons but deter- 
mined to take to tbe mountains 
if necessary to fight a guerrilla 
war against Russia, much as 
their ancestors fought off subju- 
gation by Russian czars for de- 
cades in the 19th century. . 

Many people have already 
been killed and wounded- in the 
fighting, but exactly how many 
is unclear. The International 
Red Cross said Tuesday that 
about 1,000 people had been 
wounded in Grozny. 

Russian officials said several 
days ago that L7 soldiers had 
been killed, but have not issued- 
any casualty figures since then. 
The Chechens say that hun- 
dreds .have died in Russian 
bombing raids, including 120 
when residential buildings were 
hit in the overnight assault on 
Grozny on Tuesday. Those fig- 
ures cannot be venfied. 

A Russian legislator and hu- 
man rights activist, Sergei Ko- 
valyov, who has ' stationed him- 
self in Grozny to protest tbe 
Russian assault, said that he 
and his team had seen the bod- 
ies of at least 42 civilians killed 
in recent fighting. 

' According to the Russian 
minis ter for emergency situa- 
tions, Sergei K. Shoigu, about 
nearly half of Chechnya's popu- 
lation of 400,000 people have 
fled in the last few weeks, 
100,000 of them since Russia 
began its assault. 

Mr. Kovalyov, the senior hu- 
man rights adviser to President 
Ydtan, demanded that Russia 
immediately stop all military 
assaults and appealed to the 
United Nations and Western 
countries to intervene, accord- 
ing to Reuters. 

But Russian officials made-it 
clear Tuesday that they would 
not tolerate any interference in , 
a matter that they see as entirely 
intern aL A Foreign Ministry of- 
fidaL Grigori Karasin, said that 
“attempts to attach an interna- 
tional character to the develop- 
ments in Chechnya, to interna- 
tionalize this internal problem 
in Russia,” were improper/ ’ , 

MUSEUM: 

Salute to Stihoell 

Continued from Page 1 


RUSSIA . 

CHECHNYA 


a^m 60 % 




NORTH 

OSSETIA 


y./- /Grozny,-/’* 1 

J3AQESTAN 

\ SOUtiF. '/GEORGIA 
iQSSETlA-' 


RUSSIA 

CHECHNYA -A 


./A] 

%-..A’vVV 



. : NYT 

FUMBLE: 

AIVo-WmBaiU 

Gmtinued from Page J _ 

forces, with perhaps L5 ndUioti 
men. along with Interim Minis- 
try troops can defeat the Che- 
chen f ighters, who are thought 
to number in lhe low thou- 
sands. The Chechens have ho 
air force and few heavy weap- 
ons. 

. In part, the Russian troops’ 
slow progress appears to reflect 
a genuine reluctance to take ca- 
sualties or hurt civilians. 

But -the . events of the last 
days, since Mr. Yeltsin sent 
tanks, troops and warplanes 
into Chechnya from three direc- 
tions, have humbled the once 
proud Red Army and made a 
mockery of Defense Munster 
Pavel S. Grachev's early boasts. 

“It would be possible to re- 
solve all questions in two hours 
with one parachute regiment,” 
Mr. Grachev, said on, Nov. 27. 

Chechnya, a: mountainous, 
landlocked region 1,600 kilo- 
meters (1,000 miles) south of 
Moscow, declared its indepen- 
dence three years ago. Although 
no foreign governments recog- - 
nized the claim, the Chechens 
— a proud and combative Mus- 
lim. people who fiercely resisted 
. Russian conquest in the L9th . 
century — have been tweaking : 
Moscow ever since. j 

Last summer, Russia began ; 
mounting covert operations ; 
against Chechnya, each coding j 
in h umiliating failure. So, an - 
Dec. I J, Mr. Yeltsin sent some 
13.000 troops into Chechnya ■ 
and demanded a swift capituia- - 
tion. 

.Instead,, while officials in ' 
Moscow have offered daily re- : 
assurances of quick victory, it j. 
has failed to materialize. f- - 

Some formations have re- 
fused orders to move forward ; 
for fear of harming civilians, ; 
but others have wantonly killed 



y. 


*r*tv*-- 


i l> 








„ E-3T 




» . 
t* 

>P 

Ml 

irj 4 

' n 
, * 
y.cfr_ 
■vr* 
v 3* 

D 

: 

rrtof 

-.mi 

T 

. 5 ,. f 

-** I 


Jialing and Yangtze rivers. The fleeing refugees, according to f 
old U.S. Embassy bui3dmg; : reports. Interior* Ministry 
with its distinctive colonnade, is troops killed nine civilians over ! 


now a cafeteria for the nursing 
staff of No. 4 HospitaL 

For aD its low profile, the 
museum contains an impressive 
pbotographic record of General 
StihvelJ and of China during the 
war. There is a visual chronicle 
of tbe enormous difficulty of 
constructing tbe Burma Road, 
built by the Allies over some of 
the world’s roughest terrain to 
supply lhe Nationalists from 
India; the dangers faced ty the 
fliers of “The Hump,” who 
brought nriliiary cargo over lhe 
Himalayas while the Burma 
Road was under construction, 
and the glory of the “Flying 
Tigers,” the American volun- 
teer pilots who fought for the 
Nationalists. 


the weekend and flattened then- 
cars with armored vehicles, 
sources said. 

While reporters have found 
morale high among some Rus- 
sian troops, other units have 
vowed not to fight at alL Some 
soldiers have asked local citi- 
zens to bum their vehicles so 
that they will not have to fight, 
said Viktor Kurochkin, a mem- 
ber of Parliament. 

Pavel Fdgengauer, a military 
specialist for Sevodnya, wrote 
that most troops sent to Chech- 
nya are young and untested in 
combat. The army and Interior 
Ministry troops, thrown togeth- 
er here, have not trained in joint 
operations. 

But perhaps most difficult 
for the troops has been the lack 
of clear direction and pl anning 
at the top. 

“The army is depressed by 
the lack of meaning and clarity 
in their duties,” said FHa Pamfi- 
lova. a member of Parliament 











There are curiosities that can 
only be donated to collections 
like this one. 

One example is the photo of a 
grinning American flier named 
William Taylor posing for a 

S- a SL h pl™Th&t who just returned from U* re- 

ranotc base in Shaanxi Prov- 

From the standpoint of the *£S£?l Gr0Z3 ?5!' U ? e 
Communists, however, the im- misled 



-is: 


- *,'* 


- • j. 

. v* 

i 

a- 

• — •** 


WHt 

, « 

■ ■ .r* 


* msmti 

’MS 

*»* 

rjuji 



portance of General StilweU 
was his interest in Mao’s forces. 

He dispatched a military ob- 
server mission led by a fluent 
Chinese speaker. Colonel Da- 
vid D. Barrett, who reached 
Mao’s guerrilla base in Yanan 
on July 23, 1944. 

Colonel Barrett charmed the 
Communist commanders as 
they charmed him. The muse- 
um features one photograph of 
Kang Keqing, the wife of Mao's 
top general, Zhu De, presenting 
flowers to him. 

The effusive diplomatic and 
journalistic reporting about the 
simple and uncorrupt vigor of 
the Communist forces was the 
basis for many recriminations 


Mr. Yeltsin on how easy such a 
task would be, a Western ana- 
lyst said. 

“I think they underestimated 
both tbe level of force required 
and the timetable,” the analyst 
said. “When they bought off on 
a military solution, they bought 
off a real tough nut to crack." 

The Russians are facing par- 
tisan warfare in mountainous 
terrain, with extended lines of 
communication and no easy 
way to resupply their troops. 
The fog, snow and short days 
caned much of Russia’s advan- 
tage in air power. The troops’- 
reluctance to hurt civilians, in- 
cluding many ethnic Russians 
who live in Grozny, 


^ - ..WORLD ■ 

is*-.; 


m Grozny, further 
during the American congres- the 

sional ami -Communist Lnaui- Ktcm analyst said. 

ries of the 1950s. 


Russia Runs Test 
On aNew Missile 

Agence France -Prase 
MOSCOW — The Russian 
military successfully tested a 
new intercontinental strategic 
missile on Tuesday as part of a 
drive to phase out Soviet-era 
weapons, the Itar-Tass news 
agency reported. 

TheTopol-M ballistic missile 
was produced entirely in Rus- 
sia. making it a vital step in the 
development of Russia's post- 
Soviet missile forces, the agency fighL* 

- He was dearly unimpressed t , “S® Expenses,* 

The Topol- M will gradually with the Nationalist leader, who *■* u dted 

replace existing inicreontinen- preferred to be addressed by his ^ cosls * but Mr. 

tal missiles, which were dc- formal title as “generalissimo ” ^ ^ they 

Signed by teams from the Soviet General StilweU referred to him iff , mted Stat « pro* 

most often as “Peanut.” Jg" ^tingem, 


Egypt Seeks to Cm Cost 
Of Border Monitors 

Roam 

CAIRO Egypt wants to 
cut the costs of the multination- 
al force that monitors the Eevo- 

5S£5*« bor ? er < Foreign 
Minister Amr Moussa said 

You also know who wilTnot by Pretidem^Jl'w 1 - 10 Caif0 
get them ” Sra*L “ w «zman of 

argu<ri, “we th^lStiiStiSSaf 1 ?^ 1 ^ 

the^ommumst, who will 


But for General StilweU, it 
was just a matter of who would 
fight the Japanese. He com- 
plained to his boss. General 
George C. Marshall, that if 
Generalissimo Chiang were al- 
lowed to control the flow of 
Allied weapons and ammuni- 
tion into China, “you know 
who will get them," adding. 


Union's various republics. 





t#Vso 



%“sa 

P^cxt.l 









" Gtl % 


The Post- Mandela Puzzle 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1994 


Page 7 


At “ C ° ngress ’ a Livel y *»ut Unspoken Co 


g Bill Jr J '-'Jlu 

New York Tinted Service popular, and his CODcilia- 

A BLOEMFONTEIN e u ^ ^9° prevails. 

Afnca — Nothing on tho h r^ Ut the AJricitD National 
gram says so iSr! Congress seems certain to dom- 

3,000 defeat f™, ° f £* mate South African politics 
way, but as the l *“ s L 011 ®- *0** ^ r - Mandela, who 


ncera 


A good example is the way 
the party, after threats of an 
acrimonious succession strug- 
gle. has unified behind Mr- 




mi 


mm 


Japan, in Rare Move, 
Seeks to Cut Budget 


way. but as th* Iw7. Fm,lirus 
nabli, ANC congress 

«nfeSw/-- te fu * 1 caiioilal 


!25*SP PB “ after 

diplomat who spent the apan- 

ShJS? 1 * m for eign exile, as 
“e nor apparent to Mr. Man- 


It was visible in the auemots 
to shore up the party machme 


bas indicated he is unlikely to 
seek a second term in 1999. The 
party has strong support in 
polls and, although drained of 
much talent by the exodus into 
public ofrice and burdened by 
election debts estimated at $20 
million, it has no serious chal- 
lengers. 

The National Party of Fre- 
derik W. de Klerk survives 
largely as a token of reassur- 
ance for the economically pow- 
erful white minority. And even 
that role is diminishing, as 
white businessmen and generals 


to mate it J v uusmessmen ano generals 

Mr^£tHrf^ S .£fP^ dent on «“ « “paraw deals 


Mr ManH^is’r .p:“ ucu i on ««■ mar own separate deals 

!J5w!~ a ? ’Wtfyuig moral with the ANC. 

ability matchI «s The Pan Africanist Congress, 


- . uiaitnjess 

ability to raise money. 

It was there in the party's 
efforts to tighten its grip on its 
members of the Parliament and 
government, some of whom are 
accused of being seduced by the 
liappmgs of office. 

And it was there in the debate 
about what the party stands for. 
In the closed sessions where the 
party airs its differences, some 
have begun to question Mr. 
Mandela’s emphasis on eco- 
h.*?. 03 *? growth and racial recon- 
ciliation rather than on black 
power and the redistribution of 
wealth. 

To be sure, Mr. Mandela. 76, 
docs not act like a lame duck! 
He remains robust and dizzy- 


which has posed for years as the 
militant alternative, won less 
than 2 percent of the popular 
vote, and is now fracturing in- 
ternally. 

The Inkatha Freedom Party 
is a provincial power, so much 
so that some of its leaders talk 
of giving up their three seats in 
Mr. Mandela’s coalition Cabi- 
net to focus on the mainly Zulu 
province they control. 

The only potential challenge 
to the ANC is from wi thin, and 
here in Bloemfontein there has 
been no sign that an open split 
is imminent. 

Despite some dissent over 
whether the party has been too 
accommodating to the white 


gle, has unified behind Mr. 
Mbeki, who is already deputy 
president in the government, to 
support his ascension to the 
same position in the party. 

This elevation is confirma- 
tion of his status as president- 
in- waiting, because in South 
Africa it is the winning party, 
not the electorate, that names 
the president. 

Mr. Mbeld’s most formidable 
prospective rival, Cyril Rama- 
phosa, tacitly acquiesced by 
agreeing to stay on as party sec- 
retary-general, essentially chief 

operating officer. 

Mr. Mbeki, 52, is generally 
regarded as a vote for continu- 
ity and balance. He is widely 
assumed to be Mr. Mandela's 
favorite (though the president 
has carefully avoided saying 
so.) 

The main question about the 
charming Mr. Mbeki is whether 
he is too eager to please every- 
one. 

“He can be diplomatic to the 
point where many people re- 
gard him as weak," Mr. Man- 
dela once said of his protege. 

That is not a great problem as 
long as there is a consensus on 
the balance between stability 
and change, between comfort- 
ing the 5 million whites with 
their vital capital and skills and 
delivering benefits for the 30 
million blacks who provided 
most of the organization’s 
votes. 


ESI 


Reuters 

TOKYO — The cabinet 
adopted a Finance Ministry 




Hi 


PH 


wmwwm 


Tuesday that would cut spend- 
ing for the first time in 40 years. 

Dwindling tax revenues are 
behind the decision to seek a 2.9 


percent decrease in the budget 
ror the 1995-96 fiscal vear. 


*5335 

m 


tv: v* 


*Mrt? ■* i £ 4 * f ft*/* "M »£ 

Zt+***tS* tiSS&SS 


for the 1995-96 fiscal vear. 
starting in April, to 70.99 tril- 
lion yen ($709 billion). It would 
be the first spending drop since 
1955-56. 











.... 


Finance Minister Masayoshi 
Takemura warned that balanc- 
ing the budget would become 
even tougher in the future. 

“Fiscal conditions are ex- 
pected to become tougher and 
tougher down the road even for 
a budget for a single year." he 
said. 


**&\**!»M 




f. 




Although the Japanese econ- 
omy is seen gradually moving 
out of its worst recession since 
World War II, tax revenues are 


unlikely to recover rapidly, offi- 
cials said . 

Japan will slow the rate of 
increase in military spending, 
with next year’s budget mark- 
ing the smallest growth in 35 
years. The Finance Ministry set 
the 1995-96 military budget at 
$47.2 billion, up 0-86 percent 
from fiscal 1994. 

Slower growth will be 
achieved through minor reduc- 
tions in procurement plans for 
tanks and jet fighters and 
through a plan to raise military 
retirement ages, officials said. 

Japan, the world's top aid do- 
nor, also plans to hold down 
growth in its official develop- 
ment assistance budget to a re- 
cord low in 1995-96. The draft 
budget sets a growth rate of 3 2 
percent for development assis- 
tance, at $10.9 billion. 

The draft budget is expected 
to be finalized Dec. 25 before 
being sent to Parliament in Jan- 
uary for approval. 




aaar&w 

Pain,! lie NiurmHH'Ri-uicTt 

Cyril Ramaphosa being carried shoulder high after re-election as ANC secretary -generaL 


Gore Visit to China Weighed 
As a ‘Trial Run 9 for Clinton 


ANC Elects Woman to Leadership Post 


The Associated Press 


minority, the congress has a But if the government fails to 
unity that sometimes feels more produce visible improvements 


■E* government fails .o AMcf- TfriJan NaSal 


To our readers in France 

It’s never been easier to subscribe 
and save with our new toll free 
service. 

Just coll us today at 05-437-437 


religious than political, as when 
delegates rock the rafters with 
joyous hymns to their leaders. 

The cohesion comes not so 
much from an identity of views 
as from common membership 
in a grand cause, combined 


leaders running unopposed 
were elected to four other senior 
positions. With the top six posts 
determined, delegates to the 
ANCs 49th national confer- 
ence moved on Tuesday to elec- 


uiouuw; viaiuit uuuiuvcuicuu) r, , uonuuucu, umegdua IU luc 

In the lives of blacli pressures 9S^JSSSSJSSlSt 49lh mm*- 1 confer- 

will grow for what Mr. Mandela jjj* 7 moved on Tuesday to elec- 

calls “a blind pursuit of cheap ft* *** tions for the national executive, 

popularity." " a W the party’s 80-member govern- 

To resist the pressure will re- ^ aco ^ ing body, 

quire a toughness and moral Politician, “ national chair- The national executive elec- 

Oil Ulr k/f n*« #IaI 0) 80 - linn knrl *****»<-» **«*.*«•■-*> 


quire a toughness and moral 
authority that Mr. Mandela 


with a knack for keeping dis- cannot automatically pass on 


agreements inside the family. with his presidency. 


iSSM lSfoZSSi SI ES? s £0ven " 

politician, as national chair- ’ ational nm<liK d cc- 

maxL lion had caused some contro- 

On Monday. President Nd- versy at the conference, the 
son Mandela and three other ANCs first since it became the 


governing party. Mr. Mandela 
had proposed that a committee 
nominate a list of candidates 
for the governing body, in 
hopes of increasing the number 
of women and nonblack lead- 
ers. But ANC members rejected 
his suggestion, protesting that 
having nominations dictated 
from above would be undemo- 
cratic. Nominations will come 
from the floor, as has been nor- 
mal practice. 


New York Times Service 

BELTING — The United States and China are discussing a 
visit here next year by Vice President Al Gore or Hillary 
Rodham Clinton as a “trial run" for a state visit by President 
Bill Clinton, Western officials here say. 

Mr. Clinton has been reluctant to visit China because of 
that country’s repressive human-rights practices and has 
privately admonished the leadership to make improvements 
before any visit can be considered, the officials say. 

The discussions are pan of a continued effon by the White 
House and China's party leaders to improve contacts as the 
health of the senior leader, Deng Xiaoping, deteriorates. 

Thus a Gore trip “would be a trial run in a lot of respects," 
a Western diplomat said. One Western official said that if an 
environmental conference could not be organized, then Mr. 
Gore, or perhaps Mrs. Clinton, could lead a U.S. delegation to 
attend a UN conference on women in September. 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


READERS AEADVISW 


that the In tmrntstion al 
H eral d Tribtum count be 
h*M ruspoH u btmforkmor 
d am a g es in cu rred marc- 
tuft of tra nsa ctions stem- 
ming tram ad ver tis ement* 
which appear in our p ape r. 
Itis I e ndure recommend- 
ed thjt readers make cp- 
peaprime inquiries htfam 
sentting ary money or en- 
tering into my bio ttin g 




5AIE5 AGENTS WANTED 

For ETN WorUwafe Cord «hefi 
gua \p Id 50% (fcaunt m UOO 
Hofei/ 175 counm-L High proM, mini- 
mum i moment JlO.OOCffor 500 cords 
ndwCng Hum Gmf facMes. 
Atony area st4 open far representation 

EUROPEAN nAVaiSWORK 
Donwci 30, hft 1012 Amstardcm 
Tefc 31ZW22M73 Fax 63822/1 


+4177J8iai8 


WWY VOUM* OF CASH DAILY) 
Snow, tel and wl demomtreiar moms. 
falduCB thousands of dolors it profits 
■wry week m Amenta, Europe mid 





CONSULTANTS 


TELECOM. 


Save on 
International 
Phone Calls 





CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


FUNDS AVAAAHE 

FOt 

AU. BUSJNB5 PROJECTS 
08 FOB 

LETTERS OF CRffifT 
BANK GUARANTEES 
OTHBt ACCOTAHE COLLATHAL 


HNANONG AVAILABLE 

WOfUOWDE 

All COfMMBOAL PROJECTS 


no fas 

NATIONAL BUSINESS 
„ ( RffOWTHG BUREAU 

Tab 212-702-4821 Fax: 212-867-5127 


WVESTMHff CAPITAL 


Utitori co nmn Bon g uaua— 1 


jmm 


BJREKA TELECOM 

Tel 33 W71 3863 Fbc 33 9371 4465 
YOUBCAU5AMXB 
From Spain, Hofy, O un un y fcm rm A 


AU EUROPEAN COUNTIES 
. .WITH 25 % DISCOUNT 
Rest of the world up to 60 % 



Saw 50% and more compared 
Id loco) phone cunpones. 
Cof from home, office, car- 
even hotob fond ovad 
wrehaga)- Check o m uSu 

for any countries and iee how 
you can amt mnng today 


USS 3M and up ham P 
far stort-ops - arome i pn - d 

WW POOL AVAHAHE 
1994 


Memmuti AU.PJCB. A Ge 
FWANCIAL BCimmON 
Brtmeh: -BaniUM 

Hornmhon by fn 32-2-534 02 77 
or a-2538 47 91 
THEX; 20277 


Aha nlu Mt w|i |iu i ft i i) 
Banfc G— aniee* 

If yaw bank evidences a btav tw 
a*iterdiia Ihe* ban wridi a Major 



55 itw SAME AIDE 
75001 PADS 


PALAIS ROYAL 


Cci w now and we'll 
edi you right back! 

Td 1-206-284-3600 


aAtordise thee nan wim a Major 
World Bonk pncrtn nmning conk 
for then aud«4icatailWiL 
AM offers heron ere tnkfcct k> contract 


PROJECT FMANCMO 
VBflUH CAPITAL 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


BUSMESSCMBl 

BRAND NEWSBMCto OFTKES 

H i - 1A la 60 tgjiL 
and al services 
1149 10 26 20 
Fern (03-1) 49 TO 26 B3 


FORWA8D PRQiEQ OUTUsC 
NOW TO 


* Mawnun U5J 250JXJ0 

* No Mannum 

* Tern Locro 

* Bjutiy firsBOT 

* Brotai Protected 


Fax .1-206-282-6666 

linej epeo 24 hams. 
AgM inqunes w ntantl 


INV5TW0IT SUISSE SA 

Bahnhafdrasie 86, 

Zunch 8001 Stnhafond 


ANGLO AMEBCFN GROUP PLC 

Fax +44 924 201377 


PROJECT HNANCE 
VH«U«E CAPITAL 
AvalaUe from 
Oie miSon US Dolors plus 




remmeni term Three id Ten wan 
_ Al funds are bank verified 


Ik- 1 , it 




INTBtNATIONAL LEA9NG 




T* NT. + 599543453/43667 
Fme INT. 4- S99543449 (St Maarten] 


& CURRENCIES 


IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE 

fOR FINANCING 
of puthaie of heavy rq i^> me ie, 
araohj, raeiehaU and pletnuv 
ships, inrhnmd real atOe. 


Brokers co u tirston guamteed 


! BUYING GOLD; 

^ eon refined, » powder, 

Bkmentt hagmenh. BSC— 
All qmrtfces, make offers 
by to. [32-2] 534 11 52 
Belgium. Telex: 20277 


For any information 


any ettonnau 
MJ.PJLB. i 


+- AJJE. Feet: 


CAPITAL WANTED 


FRBKH ENOWSi spedafaed in 
mekdurgy. energy, flukk- e n petieiK e 

fWdfc radear power sWkxb, cement SHOIT IBM WVESTMBIT CAPITAL 
pkmt galvonmaEng foes, unships; unmhd. 50* return Sfwmnm Pra 
proposM caret net o a l repruaMan in he 15200 Shady Grove Bd, Smte 
Pans. Reply: A. NeimmaUs, 108 rue 350. Rodv3e, M) 208S0 USA Fme 
de Sawsure, 75017 Para, Fraioa. 301-983^439. 


•• IMMBXAIE A UNUM1B> •* 
Copdd avafcUe hi 
AU. (nenest prajedsl 
ABN UJ. S2 tmJno max. 


Fax (63-2} 810^284 
Tefc (63-2) 894-5358 
or 810-2570 


PURCHASE A SALE 

of amende*, hformcdai 
WOWBL IKX aaSUI 


COMMERCIAL 
& INVESTMENT 
PROPERTIES 


RENTALS 


SERVICED OFFICES 


(7)7] CT7490 (US. FAX) 


I AM AHE TO TRADE nOHTABLY n 

Fore*, banrk gold a)*. If you 
need me TabWra 4488271 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


SCULPTURE WORLD™ 

Discover A Gold Mine In 
New Acrylic Sculpture Art 


You Transform 
posters Into Art 
That SeKs from 
$100 -$2,000+ 
Greet Profit & 
Figturn Potential 

to KrecJ Safes 



>Uf etsiMfunenUFua Control 

jnves^^-S^O^ahwq 

716 - 691-1750 

# FAX: 710-691-1766 


OFFSHORE BANKS 


♦ BtertitenVcarimercBf bank 

♦ Class A unrestricted license 

♦ No quaHteatton requirements 

♦ No taxes or treaties 

♦ Total anonyfrity 

♦ Bearer shares OK. 

♦ Imiredlate defiveiy 

♦ Includes trust company 

♦ Indudes offshore a d m ini st rative 
services 

♦ Complete package USS 35, 000 

♦ Landed number of banks avatebte 

CaB or fax for free detaBsf 
Ron Jensen 
London Tel.: 71 394 5154 
Fax: 71 231 9928 
Canada Tel.: 604 942 6169 
Fax: 604 942 3179 


U.S. CORPORATIONS 

i^i, $399 


* 5 minutes over the phone ■ 

* Serving business since 1899 

* Free name reservation 


302 998-0598 

CORPORATE AGENTS. INC. 

nx (3020 998-7078 
‘ CDeptfam GO OK 
IxfcBfwbi 

HYm/TwweueiiMfat&xom 



INCORPORATE 
IN THE USA 

THRU U,S. ATTORNEYS 


s 79 


-or os ^-jmn Plus 
ittloas # stJiQfuL’s 



i.YGW 

®r»j 

fT i 

wrrm 


Ginseng Consortium 


Growing the richest roots on its farms 
from which the purest Ginseng consumer products are produced offers 
EXCLUSIVE DEALERSHIPS WORLDWIDE, JV, or PARTNERSHPS 
with existing distributors, laboratories, importers, etc. 

For fuB dacumentaHon and samples please liaxynr personal or compay resume to: 
GWSENGA N.V. and GINSENG ENTERPRISES CANADA. INC. 


Fax: 1-81 3-593-9991 U.SA 


SERVICED 

OFFICES 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


nsjTERNATlONAL TELEPHONE COMPANY 

WORLDWIDE CALL BACK SYSTEM 

Now offers Direct Dial to anywhere 
ix\ the world at Call Back Prices. 

Fax & Data can also be used with ITC's Direct Dialer. 


Distributors Needed Worldwide 
For Call Back / Call Centers 
and Prepaid Calling Cards 
International and Domestic. 


International Telephone Company 
290 Pratt Street, Meriden, CT 06450-2118 
1800-638-5558 ext 111/203-238-9794 
Fax: 203-929-4906 , 


NEW YORK CITY 

Bagadly Appointed CXOcm 

tartha.dWnmclng Bteeutlva . 
In lha htwrt of Manhattan 


Alliance 


Bbi Ctittf* 

ftolMte»n d By « a <f O it IWiMwd 
A Equfcpod OflteM A SU0W 

230 Poric Avenue 

. Premier USA oodms 
<212)972-5700 Fmc gig) 605-3020 


Off-Shore Company 
Incorporation 

tea zero taafionjufedblai WmedvOh a 
iriqua No notao n con -nBqiired nUB- 
Eunancy Eixopaan Beric Accou*. Vou an 
guantasd 100% anenymty, aacirty, 
art(fenflalBy4«absoUBC0rtroL 


Sale of debtor’s 

Tbhlng vessels ofiffi 

LOW PRICES! 

Hay be used as metal scrap aba 
Ph. (+371) 8820011, fax 8820012 


1 Representative Duties 1 
or Situation Wanted 
for Indonesia 


MULTILINGUAL EUROPEAN 
ESTABLISHED IN INDONESIA, 
SEEKS COMPANY REPRESENTATIVE 
DUTIES, MARKET RESEARCH 
ASSIGNMENTS OR EMPLOYMENT 
WITH AN INTERNATIONAL COMPANY 
OPERATING IN INDONESIA. 
PLEASE CONTACT! MR. JK. 
FAX: <0062-21 ) 75 02 426 


/ Distribution companies 

with excellent references searched. 

W© are searching for such companies fa (be Benelux stales and F'rance 
id qualify as our general agea Bar our new sate cash-ta transit 
_ and perhaps as wbB in gsnaral far our armoured vehicles. 

This safe -Pt-Mcla grin i-rtwtfiirirgTi«» iSq nyvnay t parwynf t in PmryMp 

. FbrriKireirdorrnalioncoDlacL- 

\ ApprichSecnr 2000, Gsnmmy.Fax: (++49) 337B4K) 46 61. 




LEGAL 

SERVICES 




Wmm 


62 years established - pravHnd 
prtTOstaoai services WemaliwKwy 
for an types of burtnass. 


MTC 



Passport International 


Passport International 

MTC. the world leader in 
International telecommunications 
leading edge technology product 
development, is actively see lung 
Affiliates and Master Affiliates to 
distribute Passport and many other 
new innovative, software and 
proprietary hardware based 
telecommunications products and 
services. 

if you're currently selling dial back 
services, have a professional 
approach, personal integrity, and 


desire a king future with a high tech 
leader. MTC may he looking for you. 
If you haven't sold 
telecommunications products hut 
believe you have what it takes to 
operate an internaiiunal sales 
organization with uniimlied earning 
potential. 

Contact: 

MTCs Market Development Group 
in the United Stales at 
Wl; 1-707-769-5925 or Fat 1-707-7696190. 
MTC, Simply the best. j 


FOR SALE 

USA - HOUSTON I DALLAS / FT, WORTH 

20ynar old company, owner nci in good h«d$i and paf reframenf nga wales ta «>l cootpotry. 

WEU. E5TABUSHED * EXCELLENT OBIT • EXCBUENT REPUTATION 
Apprcrdnwhly 1000 high ms^itxujmepfadudiwfxxittmw i00%l«»«}, pius5 bsSoa 


square feat of PKME Dwabpmwl tend, al 


PlUfc a Ftoperiy Mmogemorf Compony 

VWl stH A8 hr cash w fetfed dock- 
BR0K£BS/AGfNT5Pratactedwflha lOScommtsMOfl. 
SEROUS CONRD&471AL INQUIRIES ONLY: FAX (71 3J 468-1506 


u#Stos in place. 


Permanent Residency 

Visas forU^S A 

AVAILABLE NOW. 


FOR INFORMATION AND 
APPLICATION, CONTACT 
BY FAX OR WRITE ra- 


US & European Coro., Inc 
1953 148 Street 

Miami, Florida 33161 U.SA 

Roc 305-947-3911 


INCORPORATE IN 
TAX-FRIENDLY 
DELAWARE USA 

for as gQQ plus ^t 3 te 
little as w filing fc?cs 


Easy ordering by fax or phone 

FAX: 302-421-5753 
TEL: 302-421-5752 


American 

INCORPORATORS ITD 



Diplomat status. 
Honorary consulates, 
Second citizenship, 

u/o nrrnnna fnr srdvanl 


we arrange for sohenl 
group of people. 


B.P.I. 

Fax: ++ 44-624-61 13 54 


HsnMailiec Nrntb wrtpedaky. Service la 
a » Sata Gtnnoar of eanpfca nmnter. 
Te rifcr BA id6R9 wifli phtw ft Eb sarie. 
offltx jcnlea, ILS. bnk kcobob, US atbeu 
U *m * cfewaa coaqtar jotks ft 
luistuce, IndadlHg 0TC nurket enuy & 
ifliukfjmica. Hose aqws am firt broctee. 
iHMfca&glKiiCenm 


Or.Jnr. wnUam A. Wright 
Attorney at Latw 
U.S. CarpoaUon Setvtaa Inc 
3430 Balmoral Drive, Suftc* 10 . 
Sscnmcttto. Califcmu 95821 

I Fax (USA) 916/783-3005 




















































International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday, December 21, 1994 
Page 8 


STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


First, Get the Trademark 


By Todd Kxieger 

New York Timet Service 

S ANTA MONICA, Cali- 
fornia — In one scene, 
Macaulay Culkin 
screams deliriously as be 
rounds a turn in his very own 
backyard roller coaster. In an- 
other, the family butler opens 
wide the doors of the young bil- 
lionaire’s private fast-food para- 
dise as ms awe-struck friends 
look to him and say, “You have 
your own McDonald's!” 

That’s right: Richie Rich, the 
comic-book sensation of a gen- 
eration back, has blasted out of 
retirement and onto the big 

screen. The trailer is everywhere 

in the United States these days, 
“Richie Rich” the movie opens 
on Wednesday and if all goes as 
planned, the merebandisf — 
flood linked to the tradi 
— from T-shirts to video 
to fast-food tie-ins — 
unleashed. 

Trademark — that’s the word 
that really excites Jeffrey Mont- 
gomery, 30, the chief executive 
of Harvey Entertainment Co., 
winch owns the Richie Rich 
character. He has watched huge 
marketing riches flow from 
films like “The Lion King" and 
"Jurassic Park” and wants to 
get in on the game. 

And he seems likely to have a 
shot at it, considering the po- 
tent names attached to the min: 
the producers Joel Silver (best 
known for the “Lethal Weap- 
on” and “Die Hard” movies) 
and John Davis (“The Finn" 
and the forthcoming ‘‘Water- 
world,” with Kevin Costner). 

But it is Montgomery who is 
the driving force behind Richie 
Rich's rebirth. “Ask me if I'd 
rather have a studio with 10,000 


employees or a trademarked 
character," he said and “Td 
take the character any day.” 

That has been his goal ever 
since he emerged from tte Uni- 
versity of Southern California 
film school in 1988. That was 
the year the Teenage Mutant 
Ninja Turtles were on the move, 
making their way toward their 
first" frirn, which would earn 551 
million in its first two weeks, 
and that phenomenon gave him 
a vivid lesson in the riches to be 
found in hit characters. 

Armed with a development 
deal with Columbia Pictures, he 
went on the prowl for trade- 
marked characters to base a 
film on. That search bore fruit 
at a dormant company called 
Harvey Comics Entertainment 
Founded in 1939 by three 
brothers, Alfred, Leon and 
Robert Harvey, the company 
enjoyed a remarkable run from 
the nrid-’50s to the mid-TOs, 
mi x in g comic-book publishing 
with pnimatwH television and 
product licenses. 

A FTER buying the 
comic-book rights to 
characters like Casper 
the Friendly Ghost 
and Baby Huey, the Harveys 

went on to create their own char- 
acters — Richie Rich, Hot Stuff 
and Wendy the Good little 
Witch. Yet as the brothers aged 
— they have all since died — 
they groomed no successors to 
manage their film and publish- 
ing library. By the early '80s, 
revenues had almost dried up. 

Enter Montgomery, his head 
da tiring with visions. After a 
call to Harvey’s offices in New 
York City, he quickly realized 


So with 54^ million in prom- 
issory notes and S3 mill i nn con- 
tributed by a colk 
i Khalid 


mad ibn Khalid al -Sand of the 
Saudi royalfamily, he bought it 
for S7JS million and moved it to 
California. To raise working 
capital, he sold a stake to 
MCA/Universal for S3 minio n. 

So now Montgomery is poised 
to make his leap to the big time 
And he has a team that wouldn't 
be on board if it didn't smell 
success. Silver's films have 
grossed neatly $2 billion, and 
Warner, which has built success- 
ful franchises around characters 
Eke Supennan and Batman, pre- 
sumably wouldn’t put its formi- 
dable marketing, publicity and 
production resources behind a 
movie with an estimated budget 
of $35 million without being 
confident that it can recoup its 
investment in box-office receipts 
and video rentals. 

Moreover, another character 
from the Harvey archives is set 
for the star treatment, too. The 
same production team that 
spearheaded “Jurassic Park” — 
Amblin Productions, headed by 
Steven Spielberg, and Industri- 
al Light and Magic, George Lu- 
cas's special-effects company 



Sian Reeves with the snowmen in Hans Christian Andersen’s classic story . "The Little Match Girl, "at the Lyric Hammersmith 

Kushner Moves From America to Russia 



By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 



the company 

could be bought outright. 


to life again in a film set to open 
cm Memorial Day. In “Casper,” 
which uses complex 3-D tech- 
nology, the Friendly Ghost will 
interact with live actors just as 
cartoon characters did in “Who 
Framed Roger Rabbit?” 

And perhaps most important 
for the long term, in November 
Harvey and MCA/Universal 
announced the creation of the 
Harvey-Universal animation 
studio, to be located on die 
Universal lot and devoted to 
creating new anima ted series 
and possible features based on 
Harvey characters. 


Beethoven Days in Paris 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — At 71, Wolf- 
gang Sawallisch is the 
latest in the long line of 
distinguished graduates 
of a lifetime in German opera 
houses. After more than two de- 
cades as music and artistic direc- 
tor of the Bavarian State Opera 
in his native Munich, he has 
dosed the door on the hurly- 
buriy of theater life to become 
the music director — only the 
third since Stokowski — of the 
Philadelphia Orchestra. 

He has been in Paris for the 
last couple of weeks for his first, 
but not last, encounter with the 
Orchestra de Paris for a project 
hatched in the fertile mind of 
the late Pierre Yozlinsky, the 
orchestra’s administrative di- 
rector. The plan, stretching over 
this and four more Decembers, 
is simply to do all the major 
Beethoven orchestral and cho- 


ral works, culminating in 1998 
with tiie Missa Solemms. 

Since this exercise is laid out 
in a generally chronological way, 
the first round has brought the 
first two symphonies, the violin 
concerto, the Triple Concerto, 
and a pair of overtures. The re- 
sults sounded pr omisin g for the 
orchestra’s health and showed 
the maestro — generally sober 
and emotionally reticent at work 
— in relaxed form, with perfor- 
mances rich in rhythmic vitality 
and dynamic subtlety, and the 
orchestra alert and responsive. 

The 29-year-old Frank Peter 
Zunmennann was the poised 
and eloquent soloist in the vio- 
lin concerto, while the Triple 
Concerto brought together 
Gerhard Oppitz (piano), Hein- 
rich Schiff (cello) and Sergei 
Stadler (violin). But in these 
concerts of essentially early 
works, it was the dramatic in- 
tensity of the third “Leonora" 
Overture that gave a glimpse 
into the heroic future. 


In this Thursday’s 

HEALTH/SCIENCE 


Reading 

Faces 


I 


s the brain 
modular? 



V 


INTERNATIONAL 



wmmre with nm vot& times am y 


The final concert in this se- 
ries was given at the Th6Stre du 
Chatelet as part of a double 
collaboration between the the- 
ater and orchestra — part of the 
CMtdet's own ongoing Beetho- 
ven survey and as one of a series 
of youth concerts. The youthful 
audience was remarkably atten- 
tive for music that makes no 
concession, although the final 
ovations were accompanied, by 
a couple of papa 1 airplanes cir- 
cling the auditorium. 

La the Chfttelet’s other ongo- 
ing Beethoven cycles, Abdel 
Rahman El Bacha reached the 
“Appassionato" in his traversal 
of the piano sonatas, a perfor- 
mance of superbly controlled 
explosiveness, and Olivier 
Chattier and Brigitte Engerer 
made an elegantly matched duo 
in the violin-piano sonatas. 

Meanwhile, the Orchestra 
National de France has entered 
the sweepstakes with the first of 
five conceits this season, under 
Charles Dutoit and Jeffrey 
Tate, that will coverall the sym- 
phonies. 

After all, Paris was early on 
the Beethoven bandwagon, 
when the Orchestra du Conser- 
vatoire began playing bis sym- 
phonies in 1828, a year after the 
composer’s death. 


L ONDON — For those of us, 
and we are admittedly a minor- 
ity, who believe that Tony 
Kushner’s “Angels in Ameri- 
ca” is the most overblown, over-hyped 
and over-the-top theatrical experience 
at the '90s thus far, his new “Slavs!” (at 
the Hampstead) comes as something of 
a relief. First, it runs only about 90 no- 
interval minutes, and second, it begins 
to suggest that from inside that windy, 

LONDON THEATER 

sentimental proselytizing giant a disci- 
plined dramatist might be trying to 
make an exit 

“Angels in America” was a ghastly 
example of what can happen when an 
agenda takes over from an art. “Slavs!" 
on the other hand knows enough to let 
its audience do some of the thinking. It 
has no definable plot, but its theme is the 
ryiTlftpwft of rawnrnnniCTn over the last de- 
cade. Thus we get to meet the old granite- 
statue commissars, wonderfully carica- 
tured by Peter Copley and Peter Bayliss, 
as well as the victims of Chernobyl and 
those trying to preserve some sort of faith 
in a corrupt and now defunct system. 


Matthew Lloyd’s sleight-of-hand pro- 
duction offers a series of sketches com 
current Russian life, cor at least the West- 
ern perception of it. KushnePs characters 
arc no longer in search of a Chekhov to 
give them meaning, just eager to explain 
to ns, as though we were street-comer 
television reporters, how they got into 
this chaos and what if anything they plan 
to do about it. Kushner is not Sways sure 
whether he’s writing social satire or politi- 
cal tragedy about a nation still tom be- 
tween another hamburger franchise and 
the need to preserve its dead le ade rs’ 
brains in bottles. But “Slavs!” is at least 
less of a mess than its subject 

The Donmar Warehouse follows its 
trium phant 1983 “Cabaret” with another 

rJaaair^ angr y Tterim mncanal in doSO-Up 

cm its studio stage. Sadly, however, that's 
where the similari ty ends. Although “The 
Threepenny Opera” has been given some 
wondrous new lyrics by Jeremy Sams, a 
decision to move it back to the original 
London (of “The Beggar’s Opera”) and 
then update it to the coronation of 2001 
leads, m PhyOida Lloyd's agOe produc- 
tion, to a considerably uncertain mood. 

True, “Opera" has always presented 
jlems of time and place, but while 
it brought it 200 years forward from 
John Gay to a fictional 1900 London, 


B atin seemed a more natural setting. 
Now, a futurist London can offer a few 
good political jokes but no real frame, 
while giving “Mack the Knife” to Jenny 
alone (wonderfully though she is sung by 
Tara Hugo) inevitably diminishes the sta- 
tus of MacHeath, played here by Tom 
Hollander as a cockney rock star with 
murderous intentions. 

The idea that he has a gay friendship 
with Simon Dormandy’s police chief is 
mooted, as Robert David MacDonald’s 
new tr anslati on tries to make some sort 
of coherent sense of an always and de- 
liberately ramshackle plot. But the truth 
is, sacrilege though this must be to 
Brecht/Weall fans, that “The Threepen- 
ny Opera” is now considerably the 
worse for wear. Nevertheless, a powerful 
cast and Gary Yezshon’s small band 
manage to hold the fort, while time and 
again Sam’s savage new lyrics (“Well 
help the foreigner to meet the coroner") 
suggest that at long, long last Brechthas 
found a worthy translator over here. 

Neil Bartlett’s inventively off-center 
new regime at the Lyric Hammersmith 
comes up with its first Christmas treat, 
Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Little 
Match Girl,” which now cranes to us 
complete with a politically correct final 
message about the dangers inherent in 


trying to set our parents alight during die 
festive season. Bartlett has cranmendab^ 
turned his back on the feast of pickena- 
an musical joDity and offers ins te ad a 
traditionally cMDy Nordic fable about 
poverty injustice in the bl eak r md- 
winter. -S«"i Reeves is a heartbreaking 
waif, and Chris and Torn Britton offer a 
weird snowman partnership, but in die 
end the production is fatally undecided 
about its catchment area: children in 
search of sea sonal fantasy, or jaded par- 
ents hoping for a better drama? 

“The Mercury Workshop Revue” at 
the new Jennyn Street Theatre is a brave 
attempt to recapture a long-dead theat- 
rical form, with bittersweet love 
alternating with satirical topical si 
es, most of which fall very flat indeed. 
The songs, however, are something rise: 
a haunting number about a divorced, 
single-parent father, and some anti- 
lullabies by Kit Hesketh-Haivey and 
James McConnel suggest, that we still 
have the songwriting talent and now a 
new space in which to celebrate its caba- 
ret appeal All we need is a frame in 
which performers such as Janie Dee and 
Steven Pacey can work without having 
to stand around grinning self-conscious- 
ly at the audience when not actually 
required center stage. . 






i 


Helen Merrill: Waiting to Be Discovered 


i vjA i.iv 

. — . : sr.'s- 

- 

■ r ^'' ^rz-r: 

.--d* * 

, ^ 

WM-* » 
- -y. n Vt 

"imm ■ 

! ■ • "* 

in 


: jr; ; 

•JTI ■ ■ 

-\-n WiflPl 

£2 . 

v >. b-vaam 




By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Helen Merrill 
calls herself “one of the 
guys." Bud Powell Bill 
Evans, Pepper Adams, 
Oscar Pettiford, Tom Harrell 
. . . you know, the guys. She’s 
worried that it might sound 
pompous to say she sang with 
Miles Davis. But it’s not a boast 
She sang duets with Billie Holi- 
day in Leonard Feather's house. 
These people were not icons, 
they were all in it together. 

She speaks with a sensual 
hoarseness that comes from her 
pipes, not cigarettes and whis- 
key: “We had a lot of courage, 
we had that in common. Doing 
what we did when we did it 
wasn’t easy.” Musicians pro- 
tected her “Eke their sister.” 


Quincy Jones cast a young 
Clifford Brown to play behind 
heron her first, eponymous, al- 
bum in 1954. Brown, who died 
al age 25 in a car accident, had 
just toured Europe in Lionel 
Hampton’s trumpet section and 
was about to form his seminal 
quartet with Max Roach. Forty 
years later, Merrill’s latest al- 
bum is called “Brownie.” 
Brown's approval rating is al- 
most too overwhelming to be 
true (so is hers) and for many 
years Merrill avoided singing 
the classic ballad “I Remember 
Clifford” because she was 
afraid it might come across as 
“crass.” She produced her trib- 
ute despite those fears. 

Meanwhile “Helen Merrill” 
has sold dose to 800,000 copies 
in Japan, where she lived for 
five yeans, learned the language 
and became a star. The song 


“You’d Be So Nice to Come 
Home To” from that album is 
like a pop hit. audiences ap- 
plaud the introduction. Gil 
(“Sketches of Spain") Evans ar- 
ranged for her. Linda Ronstadt 
copied Merriirs phrasing and 
inflection. The avant-garde 
composer La Monte Young de- 
scribed her as “not just the 
greatest of jazz angers — one of 
the greatest singers period.” 
She’s worked dub dates in the 
Hamptons with Elvin Jones. 
Chick Corea accompanied her 
at the Village Vanguard. 

She grew up Helen Mil ceric 
in the Bronx in a family of Cro- 
atian origin. Around the house, 
her mother used to sing the sort 
of micro tonal East European 
folksongs that inspired Bartdk. 
Although she sang Jerome Kern 
too, her mother would never 
have dreamed of doing it in a 


dub. Merrill says she was “nev- 
er interested in drugs” because 
“I didn’t want to hurt my par- 
ents, and anyway I had no in- 
terest in that lifestyle. I --guess', 
you could call me 'square.’ 
Square as a person and one of 
the guys with the musicians. I 
was always just interested in 
music ” 

M errill is now 

married to the re- 
spected pianist-ar- 
ranger Torrie Zho 
(“I gel jealous when he writes a 
beautiful arrangement for some- 
one dse.”) They live on East 83d 
Street near Lexington Avenue in 
New York City and move com- 
fortably in the oompany of peo- 
ple with financial and political 
who love jazz. After con- 
iting her record company 
with lawyers, die began to re- 


power 

frontin 


edve royalties from her hit Japa- 
nese album. 

Merrill is part of a communi- 
ty of singers including Annie 
Ross, Blossom Dearie, Morga- 
na Kin g and Carmen McRae: 
“We were all very different but 
very friendly. Biflie was a tittle 
bit lofty but not really. Dinah 
Washington was a shoe freak 
and she used to reprimand me 
when Fd go on stage wearing 
my evening gown and forget to 
change my walking shoes.” 

She reflects that she used to 
“wear shades” but now tikes to 
consider herself a “young per- 
son who wears glasses.” Awed 
how she manages to keep look- 
ing so youthful she laughs: “I 
told you. By not smoking that 
awful dope. I haven't been dis- 
covered yet so I have to keep a 
certain reserve of energy in case 
it happens one day.” 


BEST SELLERS 


BOOKS 


Hm New tt»k Tines 

This tin is based on reports tram mote than 
2,000 bookstores throughout the United States. 
Weeks m list are not necessarily consecutive. 


m 

VM 


FICTION 


Ut Wet*, 
Wk os list 


OLD OF HOPE, by Jobs Paul 
n i 7 

3 JAMES HERRIOTS CAT 
STORIES, by James Herriot 4 12 

4 COUPLEHOOD, by Pol 

Reiser 3 13 


1 POLITICALLY CORRECT 
BEDTIME STORIES, by 

James Firm Gamer 

Z THE CELESTXNE PROPHE- 
CY. by James Redfidd 

3 WINGS, by Danielle Sled _ 5 3 Murray 7 7 

4 DEBT OF HONOR, by Tom 9 THE HOT ZONE, by Richard 


1 26 


2 42 
S 3 


5 BARBARA BUSH: A Mem- 
oir, by Barbara Bosh 3 14 

6 DOLLY, by DoDy Partnn t 10 

7 THE BOOK OF VIRTUES. 

by WiHum: J. Bennett 8 52 

8 The BELL CURVE, by Rich- 
ard J. Herrmtcm and i 


i SrsoWlA.1 


1MNIA, bv Stephen King 

6 THE LOTT E RY WINNER, 

by Mary Higgins Clark 

7 GOD’S OTHER SON, by 

DOfl limn - 

8 DARK RIVERS OF THE 
HEART, by Dean Koautz _ 

9 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 

SON COUNTY, by Robert 
James Waller 

10 TALTOS. by Anne Rice 

11 NOTHING LASTS FOREV- 
ER. by Sidn ey Sheldon 

i GIFT, by DameDe Seed 
CHAMBER, by John 

24 MUTANT MESSAGE 

DOWN UNDER, by Mario 

Iff mum 

15 Sro^RmH^'^Ndaon 

DeMHk — 

NONFICTION 

1 DONT STAND TOO 
CLOSE TO A NAKED 
MAN, by Tim ADen 2 11 

lOSS&K 


12 THE 

13 THE 
Grisham 


4 16 
3 9 

6 6 

9 4 

10 4 

7 123 

8 1! 

12 13 

11 21 

14 23 

15 1! 
6 


Preston , 


2CRC 


4G THE THRESH* 


9 10 

10 THE WARREN BUFFETT 

W AY. by Robert G-Haatrotn 15 3 

11 BASEBALL, by Geoffrey C. 

Ward and Ken Bums II II 

12 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 
DEN OF GOOD AND EVIL. 

S r John Bereodt 10 41 

O ORDINARY TIME, by 

Doris Kearns Goodwin 13 9 

M rr WASN’T ALWAYS 
EASY. BUT I SURE HAD 

FUN, bv Lews Grizza r t l I 

15 ALL THE TROUBLE IN 
THE WORLD, by P. J. 
O’Rourke 12 8 

ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 IN THE KITCHEN WITH 

ROSIE by Rosie Daley 2 34 

2 MEN ARE FROM MARS, 
WOMEN ARE FROM VE- 
NUS, by John Gray I 82 

3 MAGIC EVE IQ. N. E Tiling 

Enterprises 3 12 

4 THE BUBBA GUMP 
SHRIMP CO. COOKBOOK. 4 3 


IRVING BERLIN: 

A Daughter’s Memoir 

By Mary Ellin Barrett. 320 
pages. $23. Simon and Schuster. 

Reviewed by John Eaton 

A SK your average citizen of 
the 1990s about the song- 
writer Irving Berlin and you're 
likely to hear something like 
this: “Let’s see, didn’t he write 
'White Christmas’ and 'God 
Bless America'? And live to be 
101?” He did indeed — and, sad 
to say, this paltry list of cliches 
is about all that many people 
now remember of this brilliant 
and contradictory man, an 
American hero as improbable 
as he was totally real. 

Fortunately, we now have 
two books, both published since 
Berlin’s death in 1989. First 
came Lawrence Bergreen’s 
splendid full-scale biography, 
“As Thousands Cheer,” in 
1992. And now there is this 
beautifully written memoir by 


Berlin's eldesL daughter, Mary 
Ellin Barrett 

His daughter reveals that her 
famous father lived his life in 
compartments. There was the 
songwriter, the “inexplicable, 
singular genius,” largely unedu- 
cated, who invented the 20th- 
century American popular song. 
Then there was the millionaire 
music publisher and self-made 
entrepreneur. And there was the 
devoted husband and father. 
Barrett has a lot to tell us about 
this last category, and all of it 
bears out the truth that Berlin, 
unlike some show biz dads, was 
an unusually warm, affectionate 
and attentive parent. 

The other amazing half of the 
Berlin story revolves around the 
author's remarkable mother, El- 
lin Mackay Berlin. In her open- 
ing chapter, Barrett has given us 
as intimate and complete a pic- 
ture as we are likely to have of 
the celebrated Berlin-Mackay 
romance, courtship and mar- 
riage — events that rocked fash- 
ionable New York and made de- 


lectable headlines in the mid- 
1920s. Defying her fabulously 
rich. Catholic and socially prom- 
inent father and thereby risking 
disinheritance, Ellin Mackay in 
1926 eloped with Irving Berlin, 
an unacceptable Jewish immi- 
grant songwriter. 

Combining remembered con- 
versations, letters and other 
family lore, Barrett skillfully 
lets this great American story 
unfold. In some ways this is the 
most satisfying chapter in the 
book, even though it involves 
events the author did not expe- 
rience firsthand 

Throughout she displays 
am axing recall of the minutiae 
of her own childhood and ado- 
lescence, the various places the 
Berlins lived in New York and 
California, trips abroad and 
family gatherings. However, the 
deeper emotional issues are left 
largely to the reader’s imagina- 
tion. One can't help wanting to 
know more of die author's 
growing up in the shadow of 
anti-Semitism. As a child half . 


Jewish and half-Cathotic, the 
daughter of two celebrated peo- 
ple, she had one foot in the 
privileged world of New York’s 
Brearley School and the other 
in a world peopled by Irving 
Thalberg, Sam Goldwyn and 
Ethel Merman. 

In their own way, the au- 
thor’s conflicts are the m™ 
that her parents experienced 
and stru ggl ed to overcome. As 
the dramatic core of the whole 
Berlin saga, they continue to 
fascinate and inspire, but that is 
not the book Barrett wanted to 
write, or indeed should have 
written. She has given us, in- 
stead, an invariably interesting, 
honest and personal memoir. 

John Eaton , a pianist whose 
senes on American pop ular com - 
posers has been broadcast on 
public television, wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 


ENA MARKET 

He Wav tc 


D : 


TV;.... 


: -. 


A 

’a 

its 

r ; 

r» 

•jj 



* '* inpu Rad 

J. 

;!»S T. . 

inlS-^iar.sr:^ 

! Ut ^ 

-TC -JJ.. 


Sea our 

Reed Estate Marketplace 

every Friday 


o call, just dial the Access Number for the country you : re visiting, and you'll reach an English-spe aking Sprint Operator - qt no extra charge it's ‘het e 


COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTRIES 


ACCESS NUMSStS COUNTRIES 


THE EASIEST WAY TO 


GET BACK HOME WITHOUT 


RUBY SLIPPERS. 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTRIES 


Antigua HMnml ptisan! 
Antigua (pay stout) 
Arpnrfno 


AinMBa (Opkn) + 
AwHEaAM + 
Auftrfo ■ 



Bahrain 
l otfwd o* A 
BalgJum 4 
Bermuda/ 
oaww 
Bnafl 

BrMlh Virgin Mantis & 


a*. 

Qrioa+/ 

Colombia 

Cmta Rlea 
Croatia + 
Co/fjin 
Wi 
tftrminct'Qfl 


6XU1000 

•0 

1*800- 366 -4663 

00- I-SOO- 777-11 M 
B-104U 

1- WO-S3TMO 

UIOO-Bn-177 
022-903*014 
T-BOO-3S9-Z111 
800-777 
1-BOO -J77-B000 
0B00-10M4 
1-800-623-0877 
0800-3333 
000-1016 
1-800-877-1000 
00 - 100-1010 
UHXMT7-80M 
00+0317 
108-13 
980430-010 
163 

993-800-13 


Cypno / ■ 

Ciach RapoUk 

D nwT w rfc + 

DamMam JtopuMk A 
Ecuador/ 

Egypt (CMna) + 

Egypt * 

0 Sounder * 

FT|i blondi 
Finland * 

Branca ♦ 

Germany + 

Um* 

Guam 

Guatemala * 

Handurat 
Hang Kang 
Hong Koag A 
H u ngary +/ 
fee lend 
India + 

Indoaaiia [Mm>l 

IndoiMa 


080-900-01 

0042-087-187 

8004-0*77 

U800-73U7B77 

171 

336-4777 

03456-4777 

191 

004.-890400 3 
9800-141284 
19+4087 
01304)013 
008-001-411 
930-1366 
195 
121 

800-18 77 
Dll 

OO+WO-01-877 

999-003 

000- 137 

001- 801-13 
008-101-15 


Imland-r 

H60-55-200I 


brad 4 

I77-WM797 

Morway + 

Haiy9 

172-1877 

ftanamo 

Jamaka - 

1-80O-B77-HOOO 

Peru/ 

Japan pDCj * 

0066-55- B77 

PMUfiglnn (tin mtm <W,) C 

/apan [»DO] * 

0039-131 

PMOpglM* IMCw| A 

trijc/ 

0800-1? 

TMUpglnn fflOR 

Kona lOacoail 4 

0039-13 

Wand 4 

Kama mi) ++ 

009-16 

Wfugal 4 

Kuwait 

800-77? 

Puorta Rica * 

LwcMarttfdfl 4 

155-9777 

Romania +■ 

Udnronla / 

8+197 

Rnita (Mmmw) 4 

Uwanbourg 

0800 0115 

Rnila (al atari 41 

Macao a 

0800-171 

Saipan 

Malaytla 4 

800-0016 

Saipan |TMm ut total 4B 

Me*ieo * 

95-80o-8rr.fioou 

San Marina 4 

ManoM 4 

!•) 60087 


HtthoHowdi 4 

Nnlwiandc Antflhn 

04+022-9119 

Slngapora 

South Ahka 4 

iCmnc&tffvH * 

001 BOO -IS -llll 


Haw Zaatondl1a4M«vnHh)5 


Svradan + 

Naw Zodond 

000 999 

Swlttarland + 

Mcaragua |Hmaa4 o 

171 

Sfflp * 


ACCESS NUMB ERS 

02-171 
800.19877 
115 
196 
103411 
102-6 U 
10344 

OO10C8OO415 
05017-1-877 
1-800-177-8000 
01-80041877 
155-6133 
•095-1334133 
233-0333 
U235-0333 
172-1877 
I8004S 
8000-177-177 
0-800-99-4001 
900-99-00)3 
0M-799-011 
155-9777 
0888 


countries 

Taiwan a 
Thailand .7 
Tuifcoy + 

U-Si Virgin hkmdi - 
U5JL- 

Ukrabit 

UniMArab Emlrurac * 
“"kad Kingdom (j?} 
Urtotl Kingdom (Mwwy) 
Vatican City* 

VtnoaMfa 


ACCESS NUMB ERS 
0080-14-0877 
001-999-13-877 
08-800+4877 
M00-«774fl00 
WW0-8774M00 
8-10043 
800-131 
0800-89-0577 
0300-894)877 
173-1877 
800-1111.0 



Sprint. 


Io order o free FONirapp 
CALL COLLECT TO THE U.S. 
402-390-9083 


tom nwtfietrfsra apply wMre esun'iy ic-ccwiify calling ■» a*i.l«ta IiMum wrtjiwi to ichanoe fci gdd;.ional Arc™ Nutnbsr- of Cmimo' !»' ,h " jw<"I 4««-« N.mbo, ^ ih„ counirv yau’ra -d 6* l-eDG-PIN-DROP -hju , .. 

liability. A FO^CA 1 © feUns only Uw Glotol Collng '**1 1 nu"t*rr «. PIN Gk>lol rale-. optJv ♦ VVa,t lo. seat'd ton* + ***« rni „ earJ y A.aibt^aUKM ANqi cvgfabtn hnm tOimtr*-*, 

H mfrqTpnl, ♦♦ From pay- phon« WBbrei bt-jn no" 'c« Ion-.- 'iMt+d V -wHfafr ori. lion, dialed pbone-.at l«# !*"""» " ■ r»«n , 1 c ,n, dnjna cg data mav aS? ii^awaJateSnS^.J!^? 11 ^ 

— - + jjo. oltsorHQK, 













» -5 Ste 5;. i 

** - s 







*• 


** 





International Herald Tribune , Wednesday , December 21, 1994 


Page 9 



the TRIB INDEX IIP 

byBloomberg Business Ne™S S ,^| 5 = 'f 0 u 0 n,nes - 



100 


World Index 

12/20/94 close: 112.12 

Previous: 1 12.21 


MJI S . . 

J A e « 



Approx. WBigltfng: 32% 

Close: 12481 Prev.: 124.23 

0 


Approx, ftagtong. 37Yi 

Close: 113.30 Prev. 112.79 


Cl 

392 



HO r?*»- " y 


JAS °ND jasond 


150 


130 



1994 


1994 

|. North America 


kitiniAroortca 

':,H 

Approx, weighting; 26% 
Pose: 95.65 Prev.: 95.57 

0 

OHS 

Approx, weighing: K> 

Close: 12157 Prev. - 12b£7 

m 


110 


T ■ : ; ■ 




N D 
1994 


The index tracks US. dollar values ol stocks trr Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argantina, Australia, Austria, Belgium. Brazil, Canada, Chita, Denmark, Finland, 
France. Germany, Hong Kong. Italy. Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway. 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New York and 
London, the rate* n composed of the 20 tap Issues In terms of market cspsaUzatton. 
otherwise the ten top stocks are tracked 


1 Indu-itCMl Sectors 1 


Yin. Pra*. ft 


n». 

Pra*. 

« 


don don chango 


don 

don 

dlMQfl 

Energy 

113.10 11326 -0.14 

CapRal Goods 

112-59 

113.41 

-0.72 

Utilities 

125.15 125.67 -0.41 

Raw Materials 

129.79 

129.93 

-0.11 

Finance 

113.17 112.72 +0.40 

Consumer Goods 

102.77 

102.82 

-0.05 

Services 

111.280 112.00 -0.64 

kUscafianeoas 

116.17 

115.30 

+0.75 

For mom Mormabon about the Index, a booklet is available tree of charge. 


Write id Trib Index, 181 Avenue Charles da Gautie, 92521 Neufy Codex, France. 


GATT 
Rescues 
Glaxo’s 
Star Drug 

B lo o mb erg Busmen News 

LONDON — Shares of 
Glaxo PLC surged to a 9-month 
high Tuesday after the company 
said its patent for the blockbust- 
er anti-ulcer drug Zantac would 
be extended in accordance with 
provisions in the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade. 

Glaxo said its U.S. patent for 
ranitidine hydrochloride, the 
active ingredient in Zantac, 
would be extended to July 25. 
1997, from an original expira- 
tion date of Dec. 5, 1995. This 
could mean nearly S5 billion in 
additional U.S. sales for the 
British drug maker. 

Zantac, the world's best-sell- 
ing prescription drug, generat- 
ed U.S. sales of £2.1 billion 
<$3.28 billion) in the 1994 fiscal 
year, accounting for 37 percent 
of the company's total 1994 rev- 
enue. 

Glaxo said the company ex- 
pected to benefit from the 
change in the American patent 
laws due toils “significant U.S. 
sales,” but said the total gain 
was s till unknown. 

Shares in the company closed 
23 pence higher, or 3.6 percent, 
at 662 pence. Glaxo American 
depositary receipts were quoted 
in late trading up 75 cents, at 
$2030. 

“This improves Glaxo’s fun- 
damentals — reducing one 
large element of risk,” said 
Franc Gregori, an analyst at 
Paribas Capital Markets. “It 
brings in a minimum protection 
of 18 months.” 

Mr. Gregori said the new pat- 
ent provision wDl give Glaxo 
protection from the rival drug 
makers Genpharm Internation- 
al Inc., Novopharm Ltd and 
Geneva Pharmaceuticals Lac., 
which are already developing 
generic forms of the ulcer medi- 


e International Herald Tribuw See GLAXO, Page 11 


France Keeps Swatch Car 

German Unions Fail to Unwind Plans 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Ignoring protests from 
German organized labor and local politicians, 
Daimler-Benz and Switzerland’s SMH an- 
nounced Tuesday that they would build then- 
new iwo-passenger Swatchmobile town car in 
France. 

Daimler called the French area of Sarre- 
guemines-Hambach, on the border with Ger- 
many's Saarland state, “an ideal production 
site” that offered “favorable logistics, signifi- 
cantly lower labor costs and greater flexibility 
in production." 

The first cars, which the Mercedes chair- 
man, Helmut Werner, described as a “special- 
ized city runabout,” are scheduled to leave the 
assembly line in 1997 and sell for “well be- 
low” 20,000 Deutsche marks (about $12,500). 

“We're defining a completely new market 
segment with enormous growth potential," 
Mr. Werner said. 

Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz AG and the 
watchmaker Socifcte Suisse Microelectroni- 
que& d'Horlogerie SA own 51 percent and 49 
percent, respectively, of the venture. 

But Erwin Teufel, the premier of the Ger- 
man state where Daimler and Mercedes are 
based, called the decision to build the Swatch- 
mobile in France “a red alert for Germany.” 
and the head of Mercedes’s in-house workers' 


council, Karl Feuerstein. called it a “slap in 
the face of Daimler's German employees.” 

Though the final assembly of the car will 
generate only 1,900 of an estimated 9,000 new 
jobs overall. German union representatives 
have tried to portray the decision as a betray- 
al of German labor's recent restraint in wage 
negotiations. 

Despite labor concessions, however, it is still 
considerably easier to operate a factory in three 
shifts, six days a week, in France' than in 
Germany, according to Mercedes. 

“There are 275 working days a year in 
France versus 242 in Germany, and the aver- 
age French manufacturing industry employee 
earns 28 Deutsche marks an hour, the average 
German, 42 Deutsche marks an hour." said 
Christian Dau, a Mercedes spokesman. 

Industry sources estimate that building the 
car in France instead of Germany will save 
Mercedes and SMH 80 million to IQQ million 
Deutsche marks a year. 

Mercedes and SMH have said that at least 
3,900 jobs would be created in Germany and 
more than 1,000 in Switzerland, particularly in 
development and components manufacturing. 

In addition to other geographical consider- 
ations, including subsidies, Daimler's chair- 
man, Edzard Reuter, has cited France's im- 

See SWATCH, Page 11 


BBC Can’t Wait to Enter U.S. 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The BBC said 
Tuesday that it would offer its 
television news service in the 
United States be ginnin g in Feb- 
ruary, putting it m head-to-head 
competition with Cable News 
Network in its home market. 

The announcement, made in 
New York, represents an accel- 
eration of the BBC’s plans. 
Originally BBC Worldwide 
Television, the for-profit arm of 
British Broadcasting Corp„ had 
planned to launch its news- 
based channel in the second 
half of the year. 

That date was moved up to 
lake advantage of a recent deci- 
sion by the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission, the regu- 
lator of the U.S. cable industry, 


to allow cable companies to of- 
fer six new basic channe ls from 
the beginning of the year. 

“We don’t approach the U.S. 
market lightly," said Phil John- 
stone, a BBC Worldwide 
spokesman in London. “We 
will always be a niche channel 
in a market that is very well 
served and sophisticated.” 

As of the first of the year that 
market will also be served by 
another international news 
channel, CNN International. 
Until now, it has only been 
broadcast outside the 'United 
States, la London, a CNN In- 
ternational spokesman said that 
the channel would have one 
million subscribers when it be- 
gins, mostly via direct satellite 
to home distribution. 

It will also offer six half 


hours per day in Spanish-1 an- 
guage programming. 

BBC executives refused to re- 
veal what size audience they are 
aiming for. They insisted their 
channel, known as BBC World, 
will offer a less news intensive 
mix than CNN. It will include 
documentaries and lifestyle 
pieces. Initially it will offer one 
hour a day of programming cre- 
ated specifically for East Coast 
prime-time broadcast, a figure 
that is expected to rise to four to 
six hours a day by the end of the 
year. 

BBC World wfl] be distribut- 
ed in the United States by Inter- 
national News Network, an off- 
shoot of the Nebraska-based 
cable operator Cable USA. 
INN's chairman is Reese 
Schonfeld, the founding presi- 
dent of Cable News Network. 


Microsoft Delay 
On Windows 
Hurts Shares 


By Lawrence M. Fisher 

Aten- York Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Mi- 
crosoft Corp. said Tuesday its 
new operating system, Win- 
dows 95, might not be available 
until August, the third delay for 
a product it was originally sup- 
posed to ship this month. 

The news sent Microsoft's 
shares skidding 52.75. to 
$59,875. in trading of 14.4 mil- 
lion shares, more than four 
times the daily average for one 
of the most frequently traded 
issues on any American ex- 
change. Other software issues 
also fell, leaving the broader 
market with a loss for the day. 

While some analysts lowered 
their estimates for Microsoft's 
1995 financial year, which ends 
June 30, others said they had 
assumed revenue from Windows 
95 would fall more heavily in the 
next financial year in any case. 

Microsoft could still take in 
more than $1 billion in sales of 
Windows 95 in the product's 
first 12 months, they said. 

Still, the news was a blow and 
underscored the fact that the 
sheer volume of errors to be 
fixed before the product is 
deemed ready for the public re- 
mained high. 

Microsoft made its announce- 
ment at 6:30 A.M. California 
time, just half an hour after Intel 
Coip. said it was reversing its 
position on replacements for its 
defective Pentium microproces- 
sor. While Microsoft officials in- 
sisted the two events were unre- 
lated. both showed the challenge 
of making technology accept- 
able in consumer products. 

“If you look at the bug count, 
and estimate how much code 
will have to be written, there’s 
no way they could meet the 
shipping dates Microsoft was 
espousing," said Bruce Lupat- 
kin, an analyst with Hambrecht 
& QuisL 

“I wouldn’t be surprised to 
see additional incremental de- 


lays," be said. “Ultimately, Mi- 
crosoft will face a choice of de- 
laying the delivery date further 
or starting to take features out” 

Microsoft did not release 
specific information about the 
problems in Windows 95, but it 
said they related to compatibil- 
ity between the software and 
the wide range of hardware and 
peripheral products with which 
the program will have to work. 

Microsoft said it had shipped 
the “second beta," industry jar- 

See WINDOWS, Page 10 

U.S . Set Record 
In October Trade 
Gap With Japan 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — Con- 
sumer appetites for imported 
goods helped America's trade 
deficit with Japan set a record 
in October, the Commerce De- 
partment said Tuesday. 

The overall U.S. deficit on 
trade in goods and services wid- 
ened 8.4 percent from a revised 
September figure, to $10.14 bil- 
lion. But the deficit in trade 
with Japan surged 24 percent, 
to $6.66 billion, eclipsing the 
old record of $6.40 billion set in 
October 1986. 

Analysts said tbe deficit 
might widen further, partly be- 
cause U.S. demand for import- 
ed goods was strong heading 
into the Christmas season. 

Cynthia Latta, an economist 
with DRl/McGraw Hill Inc. in 
Lexington, Massachusetts, said. 
“Not only are Japanese goods 
costing more in terms of the 
U.S. dollar, but there are a lot 
of things that you just can’t get 
anywhere else but from Japan,” 
especially popular consumer- 
electronics goods. 


MEDIA MARKETS 


The Way to an Auto Buyer’s Heart 


By James Bennet 

New York Tunes Sendee 

D etroit — 

Toyota Motor 
Corp- believes it 
may have hit on the 
right technique to get through 
to young people today: a com- 
bination of daytime televirion 
and free food. 

Groping for a fresh way to 
promote the 1995 model of its 
email car, the Tercel, Toyota 
decided to try its first info- 
mercial, testing a 28-minute 
advertisement in New York 
and Los Angeles during No- 

Sales of imported vehicles 
are expected to slow in Ja- 
pan next year. Page 13. 

vember. Toyota was hoping 
for a way to make the Tercel 
stick out from among its nu- 
merous competitors, which in- 
clude Honda’s Crvfc Chrys- 
ler's Neon and General 
Motors’s Saturn. The results 
were so encouraging that last 
week Toyota began broad- 
casting the advertisement m 
15 U.S. markets. 

The infomercial features 
comments from unidentified 
young Tercel buyers and cus- 
tomers in dealerships describ- 


ing whal they are looking for, 
and from youthful Toyota pro- 
duct specialists describing fea- 
tures of the car. It also includes 
interviews on the street with 
young people, some of whom, 
Toyota said, were actors. 

A highly caffeinated host- 
ess, Molly Scott, periodically 
bounced into the picture to 
urge callers to telephone a 


toll-free number for more in- 
formation. 

The infomercial proved to 
be a superb vehicle for reach- 
ing tbe target audience, 18- to 
35-year-olas, said Irving A. 
Miller, corporate advertising 
manager for Toyota Motor 
Sales, U.SA. ‘They’re a tough 
demographic to reach, and 
they also tend to watch tdevi- 


Honda Tops U.S. Rivals 

Washington Poet Service 

WASHINGTON — America’s biggest exporter of cars is 
neither American, nor big. It is Honda North America Inc,, 
which Tuesday became the only automaker to export more than 
100,000 passenger cars in 1995 from the United States. 

That put little Honda Motor Corp. in league with General 
Motors Corp.,- the world's biggest car company. The last year 
that GM shipped more than 100,000 cars abroad from the 
United States was 1981, when the company sent 125,661 
passenger cars overseas. Through September of this year, GM 
had exported only 38,771 cars. 

Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp., the second- and third- 
largest U5. automakers, have never had exports of 100,000 
passenger cars from the United States. 

Honda began making cars in Japan three decades ago, when 
its U.S. competitors were veterans. Honda started U.S. car 
production in 1 982, becoming the first Japanese carmaker to do 
sa By 1987, Honda had come full circle, building in the United 
States and exporting to Japan and 35 other countries. 

The decline of the dollar against the yen, which began in 
1 985 and made it expensive to manufacture in Japan, played a 
role in that turnaround. Japanese carmakers currently 
about 24 percent of the U.S. market. 


sion, when they do, at off 
hours," he said. 

Other carmakers have ex- 
perimented with infomercials, 
but none has invested heavily 
in the format yet. As a result, 
the Tercel ad has the virtue of 
standing out from the crowd 
of 30-second spots showing 
cars racing through deserts. 

While the effects of normal 
TV advertisements are hard to 
measure, Toyota started track- 
ing the infomercial's results 
immediately. About 7,000 peo- 
ple in the two markets called to 
order more information during 
the three- week tests. 

The Los Angeles test drew 
more responses than the one 
in New York, because in Los 
Angeles Toyota also offered a 
free “night on the town” to 
anyone who requested Lhe 
brochure and then visited a 
dealer to test-drive a Tercel. 

The evening out, the info- 
mercial explains, consists of 
movie tickets and dinner for 
two at “one of America’s fa- 
vorite restaurants" — a Chili's 
Grill & Bar, in Los Angeles. 
Ads with the offer garnered 
twice the response of those 
without, so Toyota incorporat- 
ed it in its general campaign. 
“They went for the burger ev- 
ery tune,” Mr. Miller said. 



SI - » » 


2* 'SS U«l USJ M US *l» !» IB2 

Sffl «si Ml Si* nw aa — 71* usn 

0*07* WB5 UK LOW 

UCU3 MBS us uis m* mss uua 

UB 9 mss 2 SSB unn uqe hum me hub 

^London. New York and**** rtxtoao to otoer contorst Toronto 
. b - To OuV one doom; '• UrSts of N.Q.: not mated/ NA: not 

Values 

SSwt VOJO 

SSSt S 

tadiniw* 31 -* 

is™** 

irttbt tuWB ’ 

"« Hshdt EE 
****•« 15577 




Dec. 20 

Eurocurrency Deposits 




Dec. 20 

BJF. 

US' 

LF. 

uzn 

YM cs 
usn * un 

Paula 

1XS° 


Dollar 

D-Mark 

Swiss 

Franc 

Sterthrs 

French 

Franc 

Yea 

ECU 

i«U « 

mo 

1.1115 

asn as 

U03- UW 

JUS* 

1.1*7? 

lmonlli 

Mft 

QL-Qli 

>5 NIV7i 

3ft-4 

5ft-5ft 

5 ft-5 ft 

2 * w2 ft 


SL4T7S 

U7J7 

0*3) 2.1737 

20*51 

3 months 

4 Vi -4ft 

5 ft-5 ft 

4ftX*w 

4 Vi -4ft 

5 4v4 

214 -2ft 

4 vv4 ft 

*0771 

K53 

132035° MOT 


4 months 


5 V5ft 

4VMW 

4ft4ft 


2 ft-2 >. 

6 ° v4 'ft 

54X7 

134050 

1442 MB.I5 

TZW 

i year 

7ft*ft 

5*-Sft 

4%«X ft 

7ft-7ft 

4tt-4ft 

7n-2ft 

4 11*7 ft 


Sonnet: Healers. Ltords Book. 

Kotos cnnMcabra to Intorteak deoodts of Si melton mMmum (oreoutvatanU. 


PtfS 
Me*, peso WO 
H. Zealand* 1*5* 
HWttLkram USB 
PW.PMO 34.15 

ptfttiizwr mbs. 
Panasonic. MUD 
Huu.rnUc 3 38 M B 
Saadi rival W5 
Sine- 1 


s. Air. road 
ftKor.wort 
Swtd. krona 
Taiwan* 
TMtnM 
TarUUiHra 
UAE drama 
VfMLMUv. 


Par* 

155*5 

W1SD 

7-5145 

2441 

an 

37753. 

1*71 

IffJ? 


Key Money Rate* 

United State close 

Manat rale 4ft 

Prime rate aw 

Federal foods 5th 

Smooth CDs 5J7 

Caam. paper nt dan 6X5 

Smooth Treasury Mil 5X5 

Wear Trentary bUI IJB 

s-voarTrw m i n non 7SJ 

5-nar Tommy not* 7.74 

7-war Treasury note 7J7 

te-roar Treasury note 7X0 

28-raar Trauary band 735 

Morrill Lynch 3May rattymet *JB 
Japan 

DtUMMtrda 
Cali money 
T-CTonMi h H erm art 
Smooth Udertm* 


mula¥ comet* **nr 4Mmr JMor 

*25 SwSwMBar UMt U«t UW 

1J3ZM 

meaner Bonk «ne* ***» Bma> Commerdtoe ttaftona 
Ta**> fTokro); Rami Bank of Canada 

an Routers ttodAP. 


Amend tot er banfc ■ 

IS- roar G ora ra m os * bond 


1* 

2 * 

2V. 

214 

2ft 

no. 


Lombard rut* 


AaxmtfaMertaak 
U-yaar Band 


U» 

MS 

5J5 

5X5 

SB 

7X7 


** 

BW 

PM 

5St 

457 

5J5 

4X7 

7J7 

in 

77! 

7X1 

7ri 

4JQ 


ltt 

2h 

2 «. 

2V. 

2ft 

A* 

MO 
M 5 
5X5 
5X5 
555 
IJSf 


Britain 

Book bene ra*e 
OaH money 
1 -month Inl eiboa p 

Smooth tatedMU* 
AouMtSi interbank 
10-year Gin 


4 V. 4ft 
5ft 5W 
4 j00 400 

4!b 6ft 
7 SO 7JH 
1X9 BX7 


Intervention rate UO 500 

Call money 5 v. 5ft 

1 month ioteraaoK 5ft 5ft 

Smooth Martian* 5ft 400 

AraodtiMeraanK 4ft 4ft 

lO-vaor OAT 8.14 &S9 

Sources: Reuters. Bloomberg, Morrill 
LynctL Bank otTokvxCommee tt mk. Credit 
Lyonnais. 

Gold 



AM. 

PM. 

Ch*sw 

Zorich 

3802 

moo 

+ 150 

London 

30040 

301.90 

+ 170 

New York 

30150 

38420 

+ 250 


U5«HMMr«m tMtontdOOdUbt- 
togs; ZurkMand Now York oaentoe and Cim- 
too prices; Now York Coatex (February.) 
Source: Reuters. 


Banks Were Established to Protect 
Depositors' Funds. It's Still 
Our Most Important Mission. 



T hroughout history, man 
has sought to safeguard 
the things he values. 

It was true in the Middle Ages, 
when hanking institutions 
emerged to shelter the wealth 
created by an expanding market 
economy. It’s equally true now. 

Today, however, safety isn’t 
a matter of having the biggest 
strongbox or the heaviest 
padlock. In today’s fluid world, 
safety is tied to prudent poli- 
cies, a strong balance sheet and 


a conservative banking 
philosophy. 

Those are the very qualities 
that have made Republic 
National Bank one of the safest 
institutions in the world. Our 
asset quality and capital ratios 
are among the strongest in the 
industry. And our dedication to 
protecting depositors' funds is 
unmatched anywhere. 

As a subsidiary of Safra 
Republic Holdings S.A. and an 
affiliate of Republic New York 


Corporation, we’re part of a 
global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and 
more than US$50 billion in 
assets. These assets continue to 
grow substantially, a testament 
to the group’s risk-averse orien- 
tation and century-old heritage. 

So, while much has changed 
since the Middle Ages, safety 
is still a depositor's most 
important concern. And its 
still our most important 
mission. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA. 


ASAFRABANK 

Timeless Values, Traditional strength. 


HEAP OFFICE GENEVA 1204 -2. PLACE DU LAC'TEL (Q22»705 55 55 -FOREX: .022) 70S SS SO AND GENEVA 1201-2, RUE DR. ALFRED-VINCENT (CORNER 
OUAI DU MONT-BLANC I BRANCHES! LUGANO 6901 - 1, VIA CANOW - TEL. f09M 23 85 32 • ZURICH 8039 • 5TOCKERSTRASSE 37 • TEL <QU 288 18 18 • 
GUERNSEY • RUE DU PftE • ST. PETER PORT ■ TEL i48ll 711 7SI AFFILIATE: REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS: 
GIBRALTAR • GUERNSEY - LONDON ■ LUXEMBOURG ■ MILAN - MONTE CARLO * PARIS • BEVERUT HILLS - CAYMAN ISLANDS - LOS ANGELES * MEXICO CITY • MIAMI - 
MONTREAL - NASSAU * NEW YORK * BUEN05 AIRES ■ CARACAS • MONTEVIDEO • PUNTA DEL ESTE • RIO DE JANEIRO * SANTIAGO ■ BEIRUT ■ BEIJING ■ HONG KONG ■ 

JAKARTA • SINGAPORE • TAIPEI * TOKYO 




Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1994 




Dollar, Like Fed, 
Stands Its Ground 


Vie Auoeetod Am 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Daily ctasfegs of ffie op " »*• l-w L«t qb. 
DowJonas industry average ?5£ 

«Wl •' ■. : V, UHI 180.99 18131 18QJ3 »».« -0-7? 

neTO Comp 1251X9 hum Wfjrt \ynM — 056 


Metals 


Bfoomhag Business Seta 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
v little changed Tu~»day after 
the market .waited for most of 
the day to hear that the Federal 
Reserve Board had decided to 
leave interest rates unchanged. 

Traders ascribed little lasting 
.significance to the central 


Foreign Eschango 

tank’s decision, made at its pol- 
icy-making Open Market Com- 
mittee meeting. 

“This doesn’t mean any- 
thing," said Jim Powers, senior 
currency dealer at Royal Bank 
of Cana da in New York. ‘Trad- 
ing is just dribs and drabs. Peo- 
ple are more worried about the 
holidays.” 

The dollar closed at 1.5702 
Deutsche marks, down from 
1.5735 DM at Monday’s close, 
and at 100.170 yen, up from 
100.115 yen. It also slipped to 
1 3280 Swiss francs from 1 .3325 
and to 5.4140 French francs 
from 5.4210. The pound held 
steady at $1.5605. 

The Fed decision had little 
effect on the market because it 
had been generally anticipated, 
traders said. “I think it’s a fairly 
safe conclusion that they won’t 
tighten until the next FOMC 
meeting, Jan. 31 and Feb. 1,” 


said Frank Pusateri, vice pru- 
dent of foreign exchange sues 
at Mellon Bank in Pittsburgh. 

The Fed has raised rates six 
Hmes this year, pushing up the 
federal funds rate on overnight 
bank loans to 5.75 percent from 
3 percent in an attempt to pre- 
vent inflation from setting start- 
ed in the economy. Its last tight- 
ening move, on Nov. 15, sent the 
rate up 75 basis points, or three- 
quarters of a percentage point 
That action helped turn the cur- 
rency mar ket irom bearish to 
bullish toward the doflar. 

“Given the controlled infla- 
tion numbers that came out last 
week, we didn’t expect the Fed 
to move today,” said Bob 
Gruber, senior currency sales- 
man at Chemical Bank. 

Last Wednesday, the Labor 
Department announced that 
consumer prices rose 0.3 per- 
cent in November, producing 
an annualized inflation rate of 
2.7 percent for the first 11 
months of the year, matching 
the rate for all of 1993. 

“The perception now is that 
the Fed will move in January,” 
said Paul Farrell, manager of 
strategic currency trading for 
Chase Manhattan Bank. 
“That’s a positive for the dollar 
and should be reflected over 
coming weeks.” 


i Standard & Poor’s Indexes 




NM LOM dose Ch’K 


Industrie!# 

TronjD. 

Wltttes 

mime* 

SPSS 

SP 100 


54424 541,74 54244 —047 
34AM 341.52 34215 ->353 
152X5 OtJS 151.W— 03 
4211 4145 41 J4— 0.16 
45245 4SL37 457.10— Din 
42204 42554 42443 - I J05 


fx 1 ;-: • •• 


NYSE Indexes 


Ml* Law LOT CtW. 


Composite 

industrials 

Transp. 

Utility 

Fima 


25L30 MU6 24280 -034 
315,1V 314.41 315.17 — 021 
21947 21658 216.94 —110 
20099 20021 20068 —022 
19744 19645 19743 —036 


Close 

ALUMINUM {Hh* Grade; 
DaRan par metric tan 
soot wan lMUM 

Forward 1877,00 189000 

COPPER CATHODES (HMl 
Donors sar name ton 
Soot 2774X0 2775X0 

Forward 2744X0 2945X0 

LEAD 

Mian *er metric tan 
SPOT 63243 63350 

Forward 65200 65250 

NICKEL 

Dottors POT Metric ton 
5Mt 837000 840000 

F m wind 8540X0 1550X0 

TIN 

Doflers per metric too 
Soot quin f in 587DX0 

Forward 5760X0 5770X0 

ZINC (5 Pedal HM Grade) 
□alien per metric low 
Spat 1105X0 1107X0 

Forward 113200 1125X0 


Pravtoas 
BIS Ask 


Htsti Lot LOT Settle arpe 

» HNMN 9 H!B 


**■!■ "-I- SB- 


U.S- /SHORT COYtR 

Mexico’s New Peso Plunges 13.3% 

P years and came shortly after 


Gt 


105LSO 1859X0 
1B94X0 1895X0 
Oradt) 


NX NX nIt; 156JS 

NX N.T. N.T. 159X5+0X5 


3002X0 3007X0 
2957X0 29SM0 


Estvdinw;7X14. Opal bit- 98.170 

BRENT WPB WL OPP 


4260 0 Min 
645X0 *0X0 


8300X0 8325X0 

0450X0 8475X0 


595200 5950X0 


110240 710340 
1131X0 1132X0 


BRENT CRUD E OIL (IPE 1. ^ 

UXdoOon per b er re i lots dlXMfcgTf* 

7M 16.10 15X6 16X0 15.77 +213 

Mr 16XB 1591 15X6 1576 +0X8 

Jusr TAX* 1595 16X5 ISM +£& 

.inv 16X6 16X8 16X3 UN +8X3 

5S? 16X9 599 1AW 16X9 +0X4 

,S Iff, SSS SB Its 

a K: &T. it?: Its +*8 

s 

Eet volume; 27X70. Onentot. 155X72 


plunged nearly 15 p shortly 
^ pScteMnounced the government 

-sasata agf fflgassaas 


Stock Indexes 


Financial 


JNT- 


NASDAQ Indexes 


NYSE Most Activi 


Composite 73QX4 73648 727X8 —0.11 

mduNrtab 73273 73047 731X9 *0X4 

Bonks 69086 688.75 688.95 —1,19 

Irwurwtce 911.76 905.68 91D34 *113 

Finonco 853X9 84948 851.03 —046 

Transp. <35.58 633X4 63548 -1X0 


TetMex 

RJFNtfc 

Merck 

Gtaxo 

Pkrojn 

CctofWlre 

comooas 

Caesar 

WalMort 

Borden 

GenSs 

GTefevsa 

Monsan 

K mort 

RjRNbPtC 


MOB Lew 
48% 45% 
546 SV i 

39* 38’A 

20% 20 Vi 

1 BH lav. 

17K T7>* 

39 37% 

66 65*4 

22% 22tt 
12 V6 iaifc 
50% 49y, 

3644 35 

69 66 V, 

14 ISM 

STa 5% 


-«j AMEX Stock Index 


20H -9k 

llVb +'A 


1796 -16 

37% -Vi 


Hlgti LOW Lost die. 
426.07 424X0 423-36 —043 


65* —Vi 
2216 -Y> 


l»i _ KKW«M«1 

49H — % 

35% — 3K, 

tev. —4 

I3V9 —Vi 20 Bends 
5V. 10 Utilities 

10 Industrials 


Dew Jones Bond Axeragi 


Httrts lot Close asm 
MHONTH STERLING (LIFFE1 
B80aM-ptsoflNACl 

Dec t3J0 9555 «S5 —0JB 

Mar 9263 9249 9260 —0X1 

JOn 91.76 91.92 7LJ3 +0X1 

Sap 9141 71X8 71X9 -0X1 

Dec 91X4 71.21 71X1 — 0X2 

MOT 91X9 91X6 91.07 - 0X1 

M 71X1 90X7 9WB -0X2 

Sep 9098 90.95 9093 — 0X5 

D« -80S 

MOT 7095 90J2 9092 —0X1 

Jon 9045 7073 9072 —0X3 

Sep 7092 9071 50X8 —0X3 

£st volume: IGIt*. Open Hit: 471,120 
SJWONTH EURODOLLARS IUFf=E) 

51 mllltoa-HsellMPCt 

Mar N.T. N.T. 72X5 +0X4 

Jan N.T. N.T. 9223 +0XT 

SOP N.T. N.T. 91X9 -002 

EsL volume: a Open bit: 2X26 

WOO NTH EUROMARKS (UFFE) 

DMI mllSaa - pts of 118 net 


HM8 lot ass* ame 

FTSE IMO-IPFEI 

ST'—Jg 3056X 30B6X +23X 
M X91S 30715 3077X +2U 

E«t. V8twm« WUtOpen InL: 57X26 
CAC 88 CMATIF) _ 

^ 9mm -i« 

S ^ ’W. 

jsr "fls 

MP N.T. NT. 1774X0 UnetL 

Est volume: U067. Open tat.: 53X66 
Sourcfs: mot if, AaspcI aM_ Press, 
.London in» FJrmded Fotuns Exchange, 
'tonPekMomExcham. 




Per Amt Rac Pat 
IRREGULAR 


NASDAQ Most Actives NYSE Diary 


WINDOWS: Delay Hits Stocks 


Mestts 

Intel 

AdobeSy 

Novell 

Oracle 

Symrtc 

MCI 

W«bKf 

OeeCoir 

Topps 

P«r1_nB 

TeiCmA 

CorstCps 

TetefMex 

Cyrix Co 


VOL High 
158463 4 1* 
105743 61 Vi 
34794 3314 
33494 1 6% 
31370 40% 
30711 18% 
30696 19 
28040 33% 
25424 40 
24593 SV, 
24454 6% 
19795 22 Vi 
19146 16% 
18851 W„ 
172SS 19% 


Lett Cb*. 
59% —3% 
41% »3Vu 
31% — 1% 
16% -V> 

39% *% 

I AW, —IV. 

18% 

33% *2%. 

38% *1 

5 % * % 

6% — % 
21% — Vt 

14% — 1% 

2 % — *» 
19% _ 


Continued from Page 9 
gon for advanced copies of soft- 
ware, for Windows 95 to more 
than 48,000 testers, and that the 
program would be expanded 
this spring to hundreds of thou- 
sands of customers. 

“The broader the group of 
people we distribute it to. the 


U.S. Stocks 

more problems crop up. ” Mike 
Maples, Microsoft's executive 
vice president, said. While he 
said the issue was the number of 
problems, rather than the sever- 
ity, he did not rule out further 
delays. 

Many analysts still assume 
Windows 9S will be the most 
successful operating system of 
all time. But the delay does pro- 


For 

investment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the fHT 


vide an opening for Microsoft’s 
competitors, primarily Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corp. 
and Apple Computer Inc. 

■ Most Stock Prices Retreat 

Stocks declined as Micro- 
soft's announcement pulled 
down prices of software compa- 
nies, offsetting a rally by Intel, 
Bloomberg Business News re- 
ported. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage fell 23.55 points to 
3.767.15, as losses in such Big 
Board issues as J-P. Morgan, Al- 
coa and Bethlehem Steel over- 
shadowed a gain by Merck. 

Declining stocks were about 
even with advancing ones on 
the New York Stock Exchange. 
Trading was active; with 32533 
milli on shares changing hands. 

Among software issues, Ado- 
be Systems fell 1% to 31ft, and 
Symantec lost IV* to 16 9/16. 

" Stock prices were also hurt by 
weakness in American deposi- 
tary receipts of Mexican com- 
panies after Mexico’s devalua- 
tion of its currency. TdHonos 
de Mexico lost 2% to 4614 and 
led the Big Board’s active list 
with volume of 14 million 
shares. 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoL 

Mali 

Low 

Last 

at*. 

ItoerDIa 

12878 

4% 

Wu 

4 Vu 

-*% 

JSBiosd 

7855 

2V» 

l'V,. 

l>Vu 

— 

^wvSfts 

7481 

13W 

12% 

171*1 

—A 

SPOR 

6747 453/1* 49V. 


— v« 

loytJOg 

6639 

3% 

3Vm 

3 'A 

* w 

Jlocvrt 

5778 

IVu 

1% 

1U 


=chaBav 

5551 

10% 




JtaCB 

5396 39% 




AirCurn 

5258 

2V. 




GcvtCn 

3975 

8% 

B'A 

8% 



Market Sates 


NYSE 

Amex 

Neadoq 

In millions. 


Advanced 

Declined 

Close Prgv. 

IT32 971 

1127 1301 

Unchanged 

Total Issues 

New Highs 

New Lows 

703 <79 

2962 2951 

27 1* 

100 44 

AMEX Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

UndKiuHl 

Toiat issues 

New Highs 

New Lows 

Oose Prev. 

249 259 

371 331 

262 217 

832 007 

8 6 

34 20 

NASDAQ Mar] 

r 

Not ovciloblea 

press lime 

Spot Cfifimod 

Sties 

Commodity 

Aluminum, lb 

Copper electrolytic, lb 
Iren FOB, ton 

Lead, lb 

Silver, Irgy az 

Steel (scrap), tan 

Tin, B> 

Zinc lb 

Today Prev. 

0X44 0X43 

1X3 1X3 

213X0 713X0 

044 <M4 

4X3 4J8 

127X0 127X0 

X9742 3-9583 

05674 05648 




94X2 

94X7 

+axi 



9199 

94X4 

UncTv. 


9173 

9147 

9170 

Uneh. 



93X1 

93X3 



9110 

9104 

93X4 

nm 


92X3 

92X1 

92X1 


Sep 

92X3 

9240 

9242 


Dec 

97X5 

92X0 

92X4 

+ 0X1 




9739 



9230 

92X8 

92X9 

— 0X2 


9333 

92X0 

92X5 

Uneh. 

Dec 

9220 

92.15 

92X0 

+ 0X5 


EsLvofcjm*: 52X04. Open Int: 67L490. 
3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF) 


FF5 rain ton 

-ntsef liQpct 



Mar 

9137 

93X5 

9131 

—112 

Jan 

9190 

9247 

9294 

—0.11 

sen 

92X6 

9249 

W7l 

—8.10 

Dec 

9257 

9250 

Y2_52 

—0X9 

Mar 

92X8 

92X4 

93J6 

— 0X7 

Job 

Sep 

92X4 

92X9 

92.15 

92X0 


— 0X4 

— BJ32 

Dec 

92X4 

9158 

9203 

+ 92X3 



_ X25 V-13 i-ao 
_ STU TWO 7-74 
_ .17 1241 1322 

_ 2.12 1208 1-T7 
_ 1X1 12-23 12-27 
. .1426 12-30 1-17 
b 28? 12-16 12-19 
_ JS 12-29 1-4 

_ J1 12-29 1-13 
. 131 12-21 12-22 
_ -25> 1*21 1229 

_ .1372 12-28 12-29 
_ L907 12-30 1-10 
_ .M 12-26 1*31 
_ .16 12-29 1-13 

opttalsotas. 


STOCK 

Xf oare pMc Loot - 20% 1*31 1-31 
REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
O Ini Carp loci for 20 reverse spIIL 
STOCK SPLIT 


flight from Mexican mSm* movements that raised & 

after was hit, with the 

™ Si n £££, down 4.15 percent. 

continue at 0.0004 new pesos per day. . (At, neuters} 

Monsanto to Buy Merck’s Kdco 

ct LOUIS, Missouri (Bloomberg) — Monsanto it 

^° ut 5300mS ^ 

fetaStndbt Monsanto was cpoted.down.$4 
ner share, at 568 87 5, while Merck was up 75 cents, at ^9,. 
^Kdoo is a^reat business but they paid way too mudi for jL” 
said Paul Raman, chemical stocks analyst at S.O- Warburg & Co. 

Strong Earnings Boost Nike Stock 

NEW YORK (AP-DJ) — Shares of Nike Inc. rose on Tuesday 
after the footw ea r maker reported earnings that soundly exceeded 
Wafl Street expectations. . 

Late Monday, Nike said its earnings in the second quarter 
ended Nov. 30 were $84.9 million, or $1.16 a share up from $523 
million, or 69 cents a share, in the same period last year. 

Revenue for the quarter was $1 .05 billion, up 3 1 percent from 
$805.8 million last year. Nike also said its orders for eady next 
year have risen 34 percent to a company record of 5L95 billion. 
The company’s stock was up $5,625 a share, at $71,625, in late 
trading on the New York Stock Exchange. 




Eat. volume: 52 JW. Open bit.: 187.603. 


LONG GILT (LIFFE1 
(58X08 - Pfl A SMB o« 188 PCI 
DOC 10*30 1Q2-Z7 10*26 — *09 

Mac 102-15 102X3 102-04 —0-06 I 

Jon N.T. N.T. 101-04 —0X6 

Eat volume: 1L4560pon Int.: 122498. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
DM 258488 -Iris of 184 PCI 
MOT 89X4 WSJ 8949 —0X1 

Jwm 07.16 89-16 SSOf —0X1 i 

Eat. volume: 32X43. Ooeo bit: 171X43. 1 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FFIBBXW - Ata OflN PC* 

Mer 110X2 11EL5B 11172 -024 

Jnc 110.14 1X9 J6 119X2 —0X2 

5W 109.38 109X3 109>a —022 

Dec N.T. N.T. N.T. UlKtl. 

Eat. volume: 74425. Open Int- 150X99. 


Chcaopk Encruv2tor lapftt _ . 

Firmer FM one riuht far eocti o u tatmUtog 
FlraTler common anore. 


Scott Paper Plans Slock Buyback 

V n t, 


INCREASED 

Excell irtd O .11 1-3 >20 

Fed Pop^ Board O X0 1*31 1-T5 

OBUKU-Co Q .10 12-22 12-31 

SS.T Bqj Q .17 IX 1-25 

waih FedlSvu(Wa) Q 22 1-11 W 

CORRECTION 


NEW YORK (Knight-Ridder) — Scott Paper Co.’s. chairman 
id chief executive, Albert Dunlap, said Tuesday that the compa- 


BlueOdpVaLie c 46 1M0 1-13 

Zlesler Co d JB 1-7 1-2D 

o-CurrecMno record date. 
d-Correcttnu amount 


Industrials 


Hfah Low Lost Settle arise 
GASOIL IIPE) 

US. dollan per metric tan-lots of ie« tan 
Job 161X0 140X0 141X5 141X5 +A75 

FeB U4X5 143X0 14175 14150 +0X5 

MOT 146X0 145X5 U5J5 T4S75 +025 

Apr 14L75 146X0 146J0 14650 +0X0 

May N.T. N.T. N.T. 14750 +0JO 


SPECIAL 

Del dot) Dev . .16 1*27 1-30 

YEAR-END 

Araetrtbw Fd - 725 1*30 1-17 

Asia Tfaers Fd - X05 1*33 1-73 

INITIAL 


Gtofcl Prtvottr Fd 
Gt Gib Dev MM 
India Fd 
Inrfcee u ei- a USA 
MMContnt Bests 


. .1725 1*19 1*23 
» 45 1*89 1-4 
_ .132 12-30 1-13 
. .1937 1*30 1-17 
» .10 1*31 1-30 


and chief executive, Albert Dunlap, said Tuesday that the compa- 
ny will use the proceeds from the sale of nonstrategic assets of 
approximately $1.6 billion to repurchase $300 million of Scott 
stock and cot corporate debt by $U billion in early 1995. 

Mr. Dunlap said funds for the transactions constitute proceeds 
from the completion of the $1.6- billion sale of Scott's S. D. 
Warren subsidiary and the sale of an energy complex in Mobile, 
Alabama, for $350 million. The stock repurchases arc expected 
during the first half of 1995. 

Scott added «h«* it has announced plans to divest itself of other 
nonstrategic assets, including Scott's energy complex in Chester, 
Pennsylvania; its global pulp operations; appixnrimatdy 13 million 
acres (600,000 hectares) of tunbedand and real estate, and certain 
other noncore businesses. Scott’s stock rose 37.5 cents, to $68 JO. 


.... *. 


, ... 


:u. • » - ■ 


oQMMf; 9 P OYQb l e fa C q po db m funds; n»- 


CBI Turns Down a Bid From Airgas 


China Denied Entry to GATT, But Talks to Go On 


OAK BROOK, EDinds (Bloomberg) — -CBI Industries Inc. said 
it had turned down an unsolicited, $1.45 billion acquisition bid 


from Aiigas Inc. for its liquid carbonic unit 


The engineering and construction company said it rejected the 
offer as not in the best interests of its stockholders. Hie company 


NYSE 

IB r- • i 


By Peter Behr 

Washmgton Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The United States 
joined Tuesday with other nations to rqect 
China's demands to join the new World 
Trade Organization next month, when the 
new global trade body opens its doors in 
Geneva. 

Negotiations will resume in February but 
officials said a resolution appeared far off 
unless China agrees to major compromises. 

[Beijing trade officials in Geneva made 
clear that China would make no improved, 
substantive concessions to allow better ac- 


cess of foreign goods and services to its 
vast markets, Reuters reported.] 

The U.S. courtship of China, Asia's new 
superpower, is being undermined by con- 
frontations over trade rules and practices 
that U.S. officials say China must follow to 
create a fair, balanced economic relation- 
ship with its trading partners. 

In one dispute, U.S. trade officials are 
preparing to target China with $ 1 billion in 
trade sanctions in retaliation for the piracy 
of American-made films, recordings and 
software, following a breakdown of talks 
on the issue last week. 


Sanctions barring imports of specified 
Chinese products will be imposed early 
next year unless China takes immediate 
action against companies that are illegally 
copying U.S. compact disc recordings and 
makes other concrete enforcement com- 
mitments, officials said. 

U.S. officials said China had fallen far 
short of providing specific pledges to open 
its markets during recant talks in Geneva. 


offer as not in the best interests of its stockholders. Hie company 
said selling the subsidiaiy would be inconsistent with its goals. 
CBI stock rose $350,"to $26375. 

CBI said Aiigas had offered to buy the liquid carbonic unit by 
assuming all of CBFs outstanding debt and paying the rest of the 
offer in cash CBI said it had $770 million in debt. In an 
alternative plan, Airgas proposed that CBI spin off its contracting t , 
and investment segments in the form of a dividend; after the 




spinoff, CBI would own only its liquid carbonic unit and would 
then merge with Airgas. 


See our 

Business Mennyi Center 

every Wednesday 


then meige with Airgas. 

Airgas proposed in the second plan that CBI shareholders 
receive 19 million common shares in exchange for their common 
stock. CBI said die merger proposal, based on the current market 
price of Aiigas shares, would result in CBI’s shareholders owning 
less valuable stock. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Season Season 


Aganoe France Prove Dec. 20 


Vta AuodAdfani 


Season Season 
Hign Lon 


Urn Oose Cho Op.* 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 

ACF Holding 

Aooon 

Ahold 

Akzo Nobel 

Bol*w*ssonen 

CSM 

DSM 

Ebevfar 

Fofcker 

Fori Is AM EV 
Gist-Brocades 
HBG 
Hatneken 
Hoooovera 
Hunter Douglas 
IHC Coland 
inter Mueller 
Inn Nederland 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 


PWA*” 

RWE 

Rhein metait 

Schertna 

S lemons 

Thvswn 

Vorta 

Vaba 

VEW 

Volkswagen 

Welle. 

□AX index 


441443X0 
234J0234JO 
44050439X0 
269 368 

997 999 
64250 632 

279_50 280 

28830288-5 0 
533534.50 
41341 1 JO 
470 467 JO 
429 <27-90 

740 947 


Eurotunnel 

Fbons 


Montreal 


GEC 

Gen'IAcc 

Glaxo 

Grand Mot 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlllsdown 

HSBC Hktgs 

ICI 


AtcoUd I 14% 14% 

Bank Montreal 24% 26 

BCE MOMteCam 43Vt 43% 

Cdn Tire A 12% 12% 

CdnUHIA 23% 23% 

Case o*3 6% 6% 

CT FtnT Svc 18% 18% 

ExtendtCOTB 1916 18% 

Gac Metro W% . T2 


935 735 
1X3 1JB3 
Z18 ZM 
14 14.10 


Helsinki 


Noditovd 
Oae Grlnten 
PaWwed 
Philips 
Polygram 
Rabeco 
Rodamca 
Rotlnco 
Rarento - 
Royal Dutch 
Stark 
Unilever 
VanOmmersn 
VNU 

Wolters/KJinwr 


Amer-Yhtvmo 88 89 

Eruo^fetmt 39 3730 

Huhtanxacl 151 154- 

K.O.P. 5J15 530 

Kvmmene 125 122 


Motra 135 132 

Nokia 671 693 

Pohlota 56 56 

RfP<*] 8130 83.70 

Stockmann 247 249 


Lodbreke 
Land See 
Laporte 
Lcnma 

Legal Gen Grp 
Lloyds Bank 
McniuSp 
MEPC 
Nan Power 
Natwest 


PIDdngton 

PowsrGen 


mamaf* 


Hong Kong 

30X0 
11 
32 
33J0 


Brussels 


Almanll 

Artwd 

Barca 

BBL 

Bekaert 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

CockorlU 

Cabeoa 

Cal run 

DeUiafre 

Electrahel 

Electrofino 

Fonts AG 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevoert 

GtaverM 

immcdel 

Kredwaank 

Meson® 


Pwprin i 
Recticel 
Rayale Beta® 

Sac Gen Banaue 
Sac Gen Belahiue 
SoRna 
Salvor _ 

TeMenderto 
Troctebd 
UCB . , 

Union Mlntere 
WaoomLin 

Stack ExcnaDoe; 7T74J0 


PawirGee 

Prudential 
Rank Ora 
RnChltt Col 
Redtand 
Roed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rovce 
Ratfimn (unttl 
Royal Scat 
RTZ 

Salftsbury 
scot nowcos 
S cat Power 


CT Finn svc 18% 18% 
Extondtcore 19% is% 
Gar Metro 12% _T2 

Gt-West LMcca 21% 2l% 
Hea inn Bcp 12% 12% 
Hudson's Bay Co 24% 24% 
ImscoLM 37% 39% 
Investors Grp Inc 16% 16% 
Labatt (John) 20% 
LOblawCns 22% 22% 
Nielson A ink 18% 

Natl Bk. Canada «k ,9% 
osnmmA 7» ?»% 

Panatn Petrolm 4«® 39% 
Power Corn is% 18% 
Power FW1 27% 27% 
Qvehocar B A 16% 

Rogers Comm B 19% 19% 
RovoiBkCda 28% 28% 
Searj Canada Inc 7% 7% 
Shell Cda A 42% 42% 
Souttiom Inc 15% 15% 

TrilS FlrTI A IB 55 

WW"" 


8J0 8J0 
2X1 2X1 
2S70 2Sl60 
2A5 7A3 
276 278 
430 4X0 
3X0 334 
4J0 OO 
1X8 1X6 
15.40 15X0 
2.74 278 

VfS!&s?s&tr iinnM 


Stockholm 


Severn Trent 

Shell 

SletM 

Smith Nephew 
SmlthKllneB 
Smith IWH) 

Sun Alliance 
Tote 8> Lvle 
Tesco 
Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
T5B Group 
Unilever 
utd Biscuits 
Vodafone _ 

Wtr Loon 3% 
Wellcome 
Whitbread 
Williams Hdos 
Wilds Comon 
FT n fades : a 




Johannesburg 

Cl 29X0 2330 

BCh 75 75 

gloAmer 230 224 


AECI 

Altadl 

Anglo Amor 

Barlows 

Buffets 

De Beers 

Drlefonteln 

Cencar 

GFSA . 

Harmony 


Madrid 

BBV 33X 3365 

Bco Control Hlsp. 3135 3155 
Banco Santander 5340 5340 
BaneStO 727 956 


1550 3475 
37 JO 37 

73 9230 

. H “ 

14.10 1155 
123 121 

38 34 


DroBados 

Endesa 


E ndesa 

Ercros 

Iberdrola 

Recsol 

TabocaieTu 

Tetefonlca 


31BO 3140 
2000 200 
5710 5800 
137 141 

845 840 
3655 3670 
3600 3420 
1405 1610 


ACCW 555 558 

Air Lhnride 707 713 

Alcotol Atsttiom 
Axa 252.90 249 

Bancalre ICtel 54S 550 

BIC 4 53 470 

BNP 25830211X0 

Bouygues n9 go 

Danone 777 jn 

Corrmhjur 7212 22 2P 

CCJF. 221 -2 

Cenjs 89 67X0 

gwroeum HS1 1191 

aments Franc 21Aj0 125 

autJMed «8 444X0 

Ell-Aaulraln* 384X0 386X0 
Euro Disney 10^ 9M 
GrvEaux 517 509 

Havas 430 424 

I metal 505 518 

LotarueCoopee 381-78 381 jo 
L taroml “1“ 6^ 

Lyon. Eam 47570 4)0.90 
Oreal CL’l 1111 113 

L.VJULH. 149 873 

Moiro-Haeheft* 120 mao 
MJchelta B 189X0 18050 
Moulinex 101-10 *21 X0 

Paribas 370 371 JO 

Pecniaevintl i_ «UJ 
Pernod- Rl card M0 32330 
Peugeot 719 7Z3 

Plnouit Print 940 927 

Roaiote<*vilaue _sii »2 
Renault 174X0 177JD 

Rh-PouiencA T2Mii26.io 
Raft St. Louts 1400 1418 
Sanofl 2S2 251^J 

SotntGoboir 04 fllS 
S.E.B. 519 m 

Ste Generate H 
Suez 25480 257.90 


AGA 
AseaAF 
Astra AF 
Anas Copco 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 
Esiijte-A 
HandeWxxikBF 
Investor BP 
Norsk Hydra 
Ptwm aclo AF 

5c£A kB 
S-EBankenAF 
SkancBa F 
SkacafcaBF 
SKFBF 
5tora AF 
Trellaaorg BF 
| Volvo BF 


Sharp 
Shimazu 
Shtnefsu Chert 
Sony 

Sum itomo B fc 
Samitafno Otcm 
Sumi Marino 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tabs! Carp 
TakedaOiem 
TOR 
Tallin 

Tokyo Morhte 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Tonxxi Printing 
Torovlnd. 
Toshiba 
Tovoto 

YomotctriSec 

o.xio a 

rfSasw-MH^ 


1710 1710 
6B4 685 

1930 1910 
5550 5500 
1850 1SS0 
SB 554 
221 820 
317 315 


►fate 

Law 

Open 

M0h 

Low 

Owe 


1057 Jul 95 

1453 

1445 

1451 

1441 


1057 Od 95 

1255 

134* 

1355 




12X2 

IZ.9S 

1187 

12.95 

1120 

II. UMOV 96 

1174 

12X7 

1274 

1274 



12X1 

12X8 

12X8 


1250 

12X00096 

12X6 

12X6 

12X6 


Season Soasei 
Ugh Low 


Open hCtei Low Cam Chg Oa-lnt 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBOT) s.gMWi newmen- <Mkni» 


EsI. sales 12XM Meefi. uses 19,901 
Mcn-s open W 194X5* OK 1774 
COCOA (NOE) 10 meter «n-l per nm 


*0X4 24X51 
rOX6 24.954 
<0X0 6X98 
*0X3 1084 
1X11 
*1 


1!» 1190 
4720 4450 
534 534 

1170 1150 
2800 2700 
IOT 1380 
719 705 

702 701 

2070 2060 
717 712 


Toronto 


Sydney 

Amcor 9X7 9X7 

ANZ 4.12 4.12 

1 BMP 19X6 19.18 

Baral *45 148 

, BCUOOlnvtlte 0X2 OB2 

coles Myer 4X5 4.77 

Carnal co 5X5 4.95 

CRA 17X2 17X4 

OR 4X8 

Fasten Brew 1.15 1.15 

Goodman Field l.W U8 

ICI Australia 10X9 H.10 

Magellan 1X2 IS 

MIM 2X2 2.18 

Nat Au» Bank 10X4 idjo 

News Corp 510 514 

n Broken Hid u» id 

Poc Dun (OP 148 3X8 

Pioneer Inti 125 3X4 

Nm«Jy Pasekfan 1.90 1X4 

PuMiina Brdcsrs 332 155 

OCT Resources 1XS 1X3 

Sonias 150 142 

TNT 117 2X2 

Western Mining 7X3 7 J9 

westooc Bonking 4X2 42B 

Woodside 478 4.71 


Ah IdU price 18% 
Air Canada 8% 

Alberta Energy 18 v, 
Aiam Afumtnum 3SVJ 
Amor Barrlck ® 
Avenor 27% 

Bk Nova Scotia 26% 
BCE 44% 

BC Tel e comm _ 23 
Bombardier B 24% 
Bromalea 1X0 

B rasain A 20V: 

Cameea 29% 

Cl BC 34% 

Cdn Natural Res 15 
Cdn Ocdd Pet 31% 
Cdn Pacific 2K% 

Cascades Paper 5% 
Cominco 25 

Consumers Gas 1W4 
Dofasco 19 

DomanindB 11% 
DuPonTCaaA 18% 




Echo Bay Mines 14% 
ErmrireCn. A 13% 
FolconbrkJoe 23% 
Fletcher Chall A 17% 
Franco Nevada stw 
Guardian Can A 8 
HemtoGold 13Jy 
Horsham 17% 

Imperial Oil «% 
Inca 40V» 

1PL Energy .28 

LetaJawA 11% 

Lakikiw b mi 

Laewen Group 3SW 
London losur Go 23% 
Mocmlll Btaedel 17% 
Magna Inh A 49V, 

Newbridge Netw 44% 
Horgndainc 25% 
Naronda Forest 11% 
Norcen Energy 14% 
Nthem Telecom 44% 
Nova 13% 

Onex 17% 

Petra Canada 11% 
Placer Dame 28’fc 
PotashCorp Sask 45% 
Provlgo 5% 

PWA 141 

Qoetoecor Print 14% 
Renaissance &1Y 
RleAlaom 2T% 

Seacrum Co 40% 
5 tone ConsoM 16% 


AW Onaiw rf7« Judex: Ilff M 

Prrvkm ■ 199UI 


, ThomsavCSF 16U8164.I0 


Tokyo 


Frankfurt 


HJshveld Steel 3750 37 






330 32660 
14714860 
240 2(5 

1924X2 


SMS SSLS8I 


AES ^ 
Alcatel SSL 
Allianz Hold 
Altana 


NedtxmkGrp 41 SO 4050 
Rcndfantetn 4350 4150 


Sao Paulo 


Ruaetet 
|A Braws 
5osal 

Western Deep 


Bay. Hvbo bank 

BavVereinsbk 

BBC 

BHF Bank 
BMW 

C om merzbank 
Continental 
Daimler Batiz 
Daaussa . 

Dt Babcock 
DeutseneBaik 
Dauulas _ 
Oresdner Bank 
FeWmuehie 
F Kruca Hoescti 


88SH 


10510430 

9650 95 

XL2S 3150 
163 159 

: 5739 AT 


London 


AbbevNari 4X3 

Allied Lyons 552 

ArtaWlastni 260 

Argyll Group 253 

Ass Brit Foods S64 

BAA 4X0 

BA* 425 


Bonk Scotland 110 


Henkel 
Hochtief 
HoectisT 
Hotzmond 

Horton 

IWKA 

Kail Soli 
Kerstatt 
Kaufhcf 
KHD 

K week ner Wert e 
Unde 
Lutttxmu 
MAN 

Mannamann 

Metairuesell i» 136 

Muanch Ruec* 2895 2900 

Porsche 690 685 


Barclays 

Baas 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boor 


Brit Airways 356 


Brit Gas 
Bril steel 


. Bril Telecom ir» 

BTR 2X7 

Cable wire 


Cadbury sen 41 s 


Carodan 160 

Coats Viyeila 1.93 

Comm Union 5X2 

CaurtauMs 443 

ECC Group 3M 


Enterprise Oil 1M 


Altearao 
AMiniila^ 

Autastrodo ortv 
B40 Agiieoltara 
BcaCommer ftal 
BceNarLevore 

Bat Pap Novara 
Banco d! Roma 
Bco Ambraslaao 
Bco Napall lisp 
Benttton 
Credfto I to nano 
Enlchem Aua 
Ferlln 
FtOtSPO 
Finanz Asroind 
Rnmecconhta 
Fondioriaipa 
Generali Asslc 
IFIL 

Itatcemonti 
Italoas 
ModfaDanca 
Montedison 
Onvertl 
Pirelli spa 
RAS 

Rlnoscente 
Sen Paolo Torino 
SIP 
SME 
Sntobpd 
Standn 

Slot 4440 4375 

Toro Asslc 


Banco do Broill 

Banegn 

pranma 
Com io 
Bletrobras 
Iwubanco 
LWiI 

WWOPOMTO 
P e t i w Oi us 
Sauza Cruz 
Ttieeras 
Tetesp 
Usiminas 
Vat* RJoDoet 
Vang 


Akal Etectr 367 364 

Aschl cnemteoi 716 714 

AoaMGless 1200 1200 

Bank of Tokyo 1510 1510 

BrkSMtare 1580 1570 

Canon 1730 1730 

riwki 1240 1240 

Dai Nippon Print 16W 17 do 

DOtwO HOWS* 1370 1400 

Oafwe Securities 1380 050 

Faauc 4440 4460 


4.14% 109 Dec 94 3X2 Vj 3X4 3 

4X6% 127 Marts 197 198% 3 

3.91V, 3.14V, May *5 3.77V, 3X7% 1 

3X3% 111 Jul»S 3.46'>i 147 3 

145 139 Sep 95 350% UOH 1 

175 3X9 Dec 95 158 159 1 

154% 12$ Jut 96 

Es tates NA. Man's. Min 27.164 
Men's oaen im 69.787 up 2ai» 
WHEAT (KBOT) 4.000 bu mmnum- aow 
4XT'. 1121 D«C 94 4X9% 410 A 

, 4X7% 3XS Mar 95 191 199% X 

4X3 U IV, MOV 95 IX? 1871S X 

, X44 1 '. 116V, Jul 95 154 154 1 

3.77 129 SeotS 154 136% % 

1X9% 357 Dec 95 163 3X3 1 

Escapes NA Voifi. 7.772 
Man’s open im 31967 off 94 
CORN (CBOT) S.M9BU rNiwnunv. asewt 
177 1109, Dec 94 115% 119% 2 

L8Jf: 1209, Mer 95 7X6% 129% 1 

1X5 19 Moy 95 134 2X7 2 

185V, 2X2", Jul 95 138% 141 1 

IT, 3Xa 5cO*5 141% 144% 1 

743 115% Dec 95 145% 141% 2 

:X0% 7/«VjMOf96 252 25S 1 

147 255V, JW 96 159 261% l 

Esi. sates NA Man's, solos 265» 
Man's open W 745477 up 1345 
SOYBEANS [QJOT1 1490 Bu iwv lum- c 
7.04 137* , Jan 95 55BV, 541% 5. 

7XS SATniMerTS 549 172V, 5.1 

7J5*-i 556 MarOS 17B 141% 5J 

7 06’, 54JWJUI95 183 V, 187 U 

117 564'yAuB95 1X5% 589 il 

6.15 171 SCP 95 5 87V, 188% 11 

450": 178'iNm 95 S94’» 197', S' 

lit 195 Jai9« 401 403% 4J 

417 6X2' :Ma 96 4 07 110 41 

626 S9»",Jul9* 417 6.17 6. 

JIT 594 Nov 96 6X1 6X1 11 

Est. sides NA Man’s sMeS 29.115 
Man’s open m 134.914 a« 1465 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT1 
OT00 I S4. 10 Dec 94 156JC 

297. B 1S5X0 Jm 95 IPtl 

297X0 1 59 JO Mar 95 161 0C 

207 00 1&150MOV95 ItSOC 

70400 16440 Jul 95 149JC 

18740 l?UMAug«5 I71.it 

18M0 I72403CP95 1 711 C 

IBIXO I73i00cl95 17SK 

I8SJ0 176X0 OCC 95 177X0 

181.50 IBS 0QJOI96 
Eu. soles NA Nte<rs.takB 13X87 
Man's ocenlni 97.211 Off 637 
SOYBEAN DU. (CBOT) M DOB B»- feta. 


144 <0X0% 366 

197 • 0X0% 41801 

175% -CXI 7,954 
144%-AX?*, 14,584 
149 -001% 775 

159 — 0.02 739 

144 -am is 


IMP 

409 %— a. 00% JB 

3.91% *000% 27X88 
179 V, -0X1% 1389 
3X0% — 0X4 5X33 
153 — 0X3% 165 
143 44 


•-aa i,i58 
♦ 0.17! 115X75 
.0X1% 45X90 
, .1101% 45X43 
|.exi% 5.117 
I »QX1% 19X32 
1 -0X1% 1.903 
I .0X1% 1.568 


1605 1077 Mar 95 IM5 I3M 1745 

1617 1 078 May 95 1298 1357 1278 

1600 122540 95 1B6 137S 1324 

1540 1263 Sep 95 1342 1394 1341 

1633 1290 Dec 95 1375 1418 1375 

1676 I3506*or96 1410 143Q 1410 

I6« 1225 May 96 1430 143$ 1430 

1505 U10JUI46 

1531 l445Sepf6 

Ed. sates 14.671 Man’s- sates 5A53 
Man's open ir< 74X59 off 433 
□ RANGE JUICE CNCTN) UMK-OHIH I 
13200 89X0 Jon 95 119X0 119X0 117X0 

12425 9X00 Mv 95 173X0 12175 1 71X5 

176X0 97X0 Mar 95 126X0 I2L50 124X0 

129X0 1WXD Jul 95 17170 12B70 128-70 

133X0 107.2] SeP 95 I3IJ0 I31JD 129X5 

129X0 1 WXQAtev 95 

129X0 IflSXOJan 96 

13070 124J5Mor96 130X0 130X0 130X0 

126X0 126X0 May 94 

Est sates NA Man’s, sales 9.764 
Man's men Wn 27J11 up 12*7 


143 35.97* 
♦ 40 11319 
.36 6X79 
♦30 1192 
*5 4.709 
♦31 6.710 
♦* 4X77 

*38 2X1S 

+52 a 


96280 91.180 Dec 9S 91X00 91J30 91X00 91X30 -60196.162 

94-220 90,750 Mar 96 91.730 *1X80 91X80 *1.6*0 —40174X91 

9X1 B0 91X50 Junta 91.780 91420 91.730 91-730 —40136X88 

91570 97X30 Sapta 97X30 9IXB0 91780 91.780 — 40114.932 

Ess.soas 666X61 Mon'S. sates 304.172 

Men's open Int ... 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 1 PWDDunO- T DcAtftaJOhUiaW 
1X440 1X640 Mcr 95 1X622 1J42I lJSta 1J598 -0 49X01 

1X380 l-S34BJun95 1X592 —10 184 

1X620 1X60050095 1X586 —10 4 

Est. sales 3.290 Men's- sates 5X50 
Man's mnk* 73.994 off 409 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) Iwdr- 1 paw equals saaaoi 
07605 0JTO0Nlor9S 07154 07176 07154 07172 *9 46X67 

07522 06990 An 95 07151 07153 07145 07154 ,9 1X21 

07438 0X96$ SCO 95 07135 07143 07135 07139 .9 1,183 

07400 0/040 Dec 95 07122 .9 29) 


-1X0 9,124 
—1X0 10X01 
-1X5 2J7IZ 
—1X0 1,023 
—»-2 2J37 
-2J» 1X78 
—1* 649 

-0.20 65 

-020 


Metals 


HIGRADECOPPER INCMX) SjaM-amnrb 


5X0% -DXl'A ; 
5.72 .00191: 

5X0% *002 
5X61, .0X7 : 

SJ* -0X1% 

508%— COO y, 

5.96% *0X1% ' 
6X3’/1-0X0V> 
610 

6.15% -0X1% 
6X1 -0X0% 


.0X0 655 

•0.90 73X75 
♦0X0 31.582 
•0X0 14X55 
-0X0 12X36 
-0X0 3.210 
-0-53 1JW 


140X0 75. 73 Dec 94 134X0 136X0 134X0 

139X0 74.90 Jan 95 135J0 136X0 134X0 

137 JO 73X0 Fetl 95 134.90 I34.RI 134X0 

137.20 73.00 Mar 95 13110 13US 132JQ 

132J0 •l.lOABTfS 

13IJ0 7*X5May 95 128X0 12*70 127X0 
l»00 104.10 Junta 12570 12570 1257D 

124 70 78X0 Jul 95 12370 12370 12L90 

120.00 lit AS Aua ta 

171X0 79.l05eP 95 118.10 1IBJD 110.10 

11570 1110000 95 

11575 88X0 Dec 95 11270 11370 112X0 

111.70 6»JlJan« 

11270 6270 Mar 96 

109J0 107X0 May 96 

107.20 105.50 Jul 96 

10575 10575 SOP 94 

11195 1119SN0VN 

ESt SOUS 10X00 Man’s, soles 11X63 
Mon's open ter 50X3» off 9*9 
SILVER INCMX) SXOOtaras.-ctaiDWIievai 
597X 7907 Dec 94 479.5 OTQ 479-5 

576-5 «01 X XT, 95 477J 48X0 477J 

477X <71.0 Fee 95 

604X 41sX Mar 95 «X5 490J 4815 


—1-55 3X28 
—070 1112 

—070 as 
-070 28.198 
—0X0 861 

-XAC 1923 


074W 07040 Dec 95 07)22 .9 250 

07335 0.7140 Mr 96 07106 ♦ 9 46 

Esl sales IM MwTs. SOJBS 6737 
Men's open Ir* 66.775 dp ITS 

GCRMANMARK (CMER) inrMl.lMwniUNI 

0X745 15*10 Mar 95 OX371 0X3*3 0X366 16377 ♦ 13 69X76 

0X747 13900 Jun 95 OMM 0X408 16404 0X02 <11 1719 

0X740 0X347 Sn, 95 0X432 *13 138 

EX.srfns 10,989 Man's. sales 15X75 

Man's open Int 110643 a 8 53Z3 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) swiyv mwwSiMMI 

amastaugta80Mir9saLOio074io)D(B2Dxi0057ainDD69 — b tubs 

10106701X09776Junta 0X102000X102070X101890X10194 —9 2725 

1X107731X1 IDOOSepJS 0X10322 —9 327 

OLOT076aUn0420Dec9S 0X104620X104620X104500X1043 —9 117 

101093OX10540Mar 96101056010105820X105450X10583 -X 37 

Eft. SCOT 11X45 Man's, sates 13,766 

Men's open Int 99.931 off 2800 

SWISS FR ANC I CMER) Iprte w lpaweliOTl 

0X134 17787 Mar 95 17547 17567 17541 17556 *14 3A92X 

0X163 1 7193 Jun 95 17600 17610 17600 17407 *14 505 

GX1S5 W41IS8P8S 17441 *14 H 

Bit. sates £317 Man'k.SOfcS 1X99 

Mon's open int 64X39 off 1941 


♦14 36.924 
*14 505 

*14 55 


Industrials 


— 120 3XS7 
— 110 

1,971 

*0.15 

♦OXfl 3X73 
-DA) 


*0® 3.584 
►ISO 10 


41BXMOT9 5 499.0 49SJ 409X 

6I0X 420X Jul 95 496X 501 X 496-9 

403-5 177X500 95 503.0 5015 5CL0 

6ZBX 4814 Dec *5 5115 J1LS 514.0 

617X JUXJcaita 

422.0 49BXMO-96 

599X 499XMOK96 536-5 53LS 536.5 

600 0 S20XJUI94 

S34X JJJXSeota 

Es,. sates 13X00 Man's, sates 7X99 
Man's open im 132.675 up <70 
PLATINUM (NMER) SOVfe-w entas ta to, 
4H^1 374X0 Jan »S 4HX0 170X0 417X0 

439 00 19099 Apr 95 419 JO 422 ta 419X0 

437X0 409-J0 Jul 95 <25X0 42X50 425.00 

441J0 411X0 Oa ta 

439 JO 42100 Jon 94 

Est.vOT NA Man's. sates 5X9| 

Man's Been tot 25.966 off 1159 

Sf?y? tel** 4— trtera 

30X0 Doc 9* 181.10 382-30 3(1X0 
380X0 379 jo Jan » 

riJXO JOJOFebta 382X0 38120 382.50 
417X0 364J0 Apr 95 3B6J0 389.10 38630 

421£ ^JPA»95 790-50 393J0 JWUP 

4MJ0 3HJ0AU0 9S 
<19.30 401X0 Oct 81 

199 -» Dec 95 405X0 406X0 <05X0 
424JO 404xOR*96 

0030 <1130 Apr ti 

<31X0 <13 00 Junta 

Aug 96 

„ Out 96 

gr sates 70X00 Mon’v sates 7X74 

Mon seam tel 177 JIT up 117 


nflODeCte 29 2S 29J0 
72jjjan9i 27J7 VM 
22.91 Mar 95 26.65 26XJ 
72X5 MOV 95 2575 76.95 

7276 XI 95 7S35 25x0 
72.73 Aua 95 75.10 25X5 

77.755ff>9S 24Efl 24X0 

22. 75 Delta 24.70 2425 

72 S3 Doc ta 7440 24X0 

21UJcyi9e 

> na Man's sales 77Jis 


-0X7 3X03 
-0.13 32X27 
-0X7 29.907 
-0XS 19X00 

-an U.S*? 

—0.09 2X94 

-aio 2,773 
4X91 
-0X3 5XS1 

♦AIO S3 


rxon'sapenM 1 10.20 off 1W 


Livestock 


TaifsmemEny 23ta 



Fuji Photo 
Fujitsu 


Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi COM* 


II Or I JUS . 47417 


2150 2140 
2200 2290 
920 977 

tat 949 
830 820 

1720 1690 
5250 5270 
717 70) 
482 405 
830 825 

3410 2400 
397 396 

H>90 KW 
K5 914 
695 W 
7340 7300 


Tel*«iobe 18% 

Ttius 14W 

Thomson W% 

Teroem Bank TV* 

Transotta M 

TronsCdaPloe m* 

M Dominion 06 

WesTburn# 11 


WesiuiuU Env 22% 


Singapore 


AslQ POCBrvw 
Cerebes 

City Pe w lo w iwit 
Cycle & Carriage 
DBS 

DBS Land 
FE Lavlngston 
Fraser GNeove 
W Ewtn Lite 
Hon g Leo na Fin 
IisIkbk 
J urang Shipyard 
KOVHtanjCoPri 
Keapei 
Natstcri 
Neptune Orient 
OCBC taretgn 


©•seas Union Bk 
lOVes Union Ent 


17X0 1750 
7X0 IM 

7 jo &ro 

13-30 1120 
1030 1030 
L40 04 
8X0 4X0 
TAW 15X0 
36J0 77 

4.12 408 

5 110 

njo nxo 

1-74 1J2 
1120 12.10 
7.99 192 
1.95 1X5 
1120 15X0 
4J0 <5X0 
0 B.U 


itaYokada 
Itochu 

Jopgn Airlines 
Kollma 
Kansal Power 
Kawesokt Steel 
K irin Bre wery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kvootni 

Matsu Elec inds 1570 1340 
Matsu Elec Wks 10TO MM 
fMtSuMMBk 2420 2380 
MJtsutj Chemical n SP 
Mitsubishi Elec 490 
Mitsubishi MW 2» ™ 
Mitsubishi Caro 1290 ittO 
MltsuiandCa 835 RJ 
Mitsui Marine "* 

MHsukashl 

Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
.Nlkko Securities 1070 10« 
Nippon Kpeofcv ra 

Nippon oil “* “* 

Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yuen 

Nissan 

Nomura Sec 
NTT _ „ . 84400 8390a 


Xerox Canada B 45 


Zurich 


731 725 

1010 1020 
1380 1370 
1120 1133 
9W 995 


833 820 
475 474 
1241 1258 


699 662 

342 359 
645 Ml 
814 814 

MM aw 

8440a 8390a 


Olympus Optical MOO row 

Pioneer 7470 S0C 

Ricoh £□ 943 

Sonya Eiec 570 SM 


Mia inti B 219 222 

Atasulsse B new 438 60 
BBC Brvm Bov B 1120 1107 
Cttn Getgy 776 775 

CS Holdings B 554 54J 

Etekfrow B »* 3S5 

FjXtlerB _ 1570 1400 

IntordlscDunf 9 IMS 1520 
Jelmoll B 705 730 

Landis Gvr R 
MoevwuwckB 

Nestle R 1241 1258 

Oernh. Buetirie R 128 129 
Parana Hid B la 1490 
Roche Hdg PC 4180 6135 
Safra Reaublie las 103 
Sandoz B — “ 

Schindler B 

Softer PC SH 853 

SuryeflKVXX B 1830 igi5 
Swfss BnkCerpB 365 343 
Swiss Relnsur R 770 747 

Swtesuir R 
UBS B 

WhwerthurB 
Zurich Ass B 


CATTLE (CMER) MXMfcv - mwo 
”4-30 66 7' Dec 94 70X5 7045 7000 

74X5 66X7 Feb 9S 70J5 7010 T0^0 

75 10 67-27 Apr ta 71X5 77.12 7BBD 

69J3 64.00 Jun 95 66.15 (4.15 65X5 

68.10 47.50 AW 95 44.IB 41.10 6120 

67J5 63 10 Oct ta 44-40 MM MM 

66X5 63»Decta 45.20 65- » *4.90 

Est.uves sjxv Man's sam 11.219 
Mon’* noon tot 67.557 off T90 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) UOOOtev - oh>b 
6Q.9J 71 .40 Jon 9J 75X0 7540 75X0 

SOi 70.ISl.Vyta .110 1310 77X0 

76.90 69.taApr9S 7192 71 02 71X0 

7t JB « JO May 95 Tin lies 7045 

7105 494s Aug 95 71X5 71X5 7190 

70 50 687500 95 

80 DO 69 80 Nov 95 

nxo 69.00 Sea 96 njo tuo 7ua 

Esl.sam ixs6 rAon'^wm 2x44 
Man '40OW1 to 8960 go W 
HOGS (OTSO 40X«P6-c«te»Be'P 
S0JD 30 JO Doc 94 3445 3445 D_JJ 

50.40 34X2FH95 37TI 3791 J7J7 

48X0 3iH54pr95 37 JO 37.7} 37X0 

a JO 4DJ5 Junta 43.12 43.42 43.92 

45.00 4146 Jul 95 4115 075 42.95 

44J0 40X0 Aug 95 <L30 4U0 42.95 

42J0 383000 95 41.12 41.17 40.90 

4)05 39X0 DK 95 42.75 43.87 42X1 ■ 

4120 41. 01 Feb 94 41* ASD 4110 

Edisrira 8273 Mon’ntee* 152 
Man’s 0P*n tei 13.U8 on 5 a 
PORX8aj.ES (CMER) «eiM.iTOWI 


-0.15 7X08 

.0X2 31.157 
-0.12 22X89 
— QJO 7.131 
-111 3J1J 
-038 1X51 
-128 229 


—118 3X35 
-0 26 U71 
-010 1,192 
-OJS 930 

3$ % 

-Itt 9 


•S3 45 

•S3 78 

-sx 

•SX 73J34 
-5.1 10X57 
‘5.1 7X45 
-5.1 9X93 
■5.1 189K 

• 81 7X94 
-81 

* 8 i ixa 

-81 202 


•>« BM 
*310 14,922 
•HO 2X42 
-3.10 K* 
-HO 114 


•2X0 114 

*2 JO 

♦ISO 88X08 
*U> 13X51 
•ZJD 77X9) 
•150 12X23 
♦140 

•3X0 9J74 

-170 

*2X0 

- 2 x 0 

-2X0 


Finonaal 


-0X0 900 

-X.12 14.116 
M4S 
• 0X3 4X80 


•0.10 1,005 
-830 1X78 
—AH >AH 
-130 »9 

— 045 44 


£T. SILLS (CMER) iiir«tek«ewpa. 

W.I3Mar»S 93.47 9158 9147 93J5 *0*17.134 

9A2* 97 55 Jun 95 92X5 92X6 92X5 92J9 .0X1 JJB2 

»IJ53«m 92X3 92X0 92J2 9ZJ2 802 

fhn's-som ta 

Mon 5 nowtol 

5TR.TffEAHJ«T (CBOT) tieBOTnte-eteCJMiNWOOCt 
2+S 'OO-OT Dec 94 1 00-23 100-28 100-21 100-27 • 03 22.53 

2« 5 M»WJM9 NO-131 100-08 W-IIS- 025 U81I6 

iSPJg *9-06 Junta IOO-CI5, 025 281 

99-235 99-07 Sen ta 99-235 * 02 

Esi son NA Man's. tote* 27.110 
Mqnsgppnw 210,920 all 1481 


COTTONS (NCTN) KUEOta- miMk 
8851 64.00 Mar 95 8425 85X0 8108 

3820 44 00 MOV 95 0810 86.10 8170 

85J0 69 JO Jul « 84.90 BSM 83X5 

7830 46X000 95 74X0 7 800 74X6 

72X0 68250X95 7230 7140 7122 

73 00 6flWMor9* 

74.K) 7170 May 94 

Esi. totes NA Man‘8 sales 7X94 
Marrsopenlnt 5BX4S off 10 
lEATlNGOfl. (NMER) 42.ocooM.cmh taw 
6225 4125 Jan 95 <7X0 4825 47X0 

MJi 46.90FO095 4820 48.70 «.10 

47-X MuT 25 <850 49X0 48.40 

5815 43.05 Aur 95 <825 4BXS <815 

54J0 <7J30Mavta 48X0 Mxo <8X0 

SL50 <629 Jun 95 47X0 48X0 47X0 
5430 47 JO Jul ta 4*20 xSt 

5SM 0.70 Aug 9S 48J0 48.70 4BJD 

5110 <8X5 SeP 95 49X5 49X5 49X5 

5195 49.90 Oa 95 51X0 51X0 si .00 

5440 50.90 Nov 95 SI.9S 51.95 flXf 

S7M 51 X0 Dec 95 5225 51X5 5225 

sojojonte siss aas cryt 

gXOFebta 53X0 51M '.mi 

54.90 5140 Mar 9« 52-09 52.90 52X9 

54X0 M00 Aar 96 52X0 52.60 52.40 

Est.iam NA Mon's. SCOT 32X61 
AVI S open to 150.761 ua 798 
UCMT SWEET CRUDS (NMER) uPW.a 

I8I5JOH9S 17X0 17.14 18|t 

19X0 1528 Res 95 17X1 17.1$ 14.93 

20X4 S47Mor9S 17.12 1722 17X6 

9X8 1855 Apr 95 17.13 17J7 1733 

1924 15X9Morta 17X6 17J3 1JJ6 

173 Jun 95 I7JS 17.60 7JI 

9W 605 Jul 95 17X1 !7.« | 7 i 

I-5I JLUAUB9& 17X7 17x9 17X6 

HS ILKSnJta 12J8 17 jj 17 « 

14X2 Data 17X0 17X0 17J9 

taS UM Yr% }’j£ 

iiiu ’ ?,M ,u * ,7M 

111 ? ' 7M ' 7U 

J7.90MOV96 
SOW 1727 Jun 96 

«*>£ 17.9B3to 94 

aoo 1 7X0 Dec M 

Ea. sates NA Mon's, sain 77.621 
Man's Otan tm 3MX2* Off HOT* 623 
{WLEADCOOXfiOuteg (NAIER) 42i»W.« 

»« CJOJanta 51x0 sixo^m.90 

SLM «LlSRtt9S 50.75 5)xo 50X0 

«.ta A.QQMcrta 90.95 Sl?o Mta 

Srn SL>® S4« 53M 

^2 §■»«?;? M 


— 0J9 31,945 
-A39 11,755 
— H33 8942 
—0X3 1X37 
—0.73 6X77 
—0X4 45 

-0X5 


♦0.02 77X95 
•OjDi 43,903 
*0JJ2 28914 
-0JD 14X27 
-0.02 7X48 
-0X2 4X70 
*0X2 7JB5 
* OJP 3J9D 
*0U7 1374 
-0X7 1.916 
4 0X7 1X51 
-0» 5X98 
•007 *21 

-0.07 814 

*0X7 

-0X7 235 




-0X7 27X64 
•0X0103.715 
-0.QJ 55X05 
-0X4 22,119 
-0X3 12X10 
•0X2 27X21 
♦0X1 12X84 

-Jtn ioxm 

-0.02 I4J57 

—am 8X44 

— 0. 07 5.968 

—am 18X42 
-W3 8X61 
-0X6 2.980 
-004 6X99 
—0X6 
-0.04 

-006 16X77 
-0X6 

-0X6 15x12 


58XB HA) Jun 95 

P-2 S-“JuUS 

5835 52.70 S» 95 

BJJ 5IJOOCJ95 

»fo austto .93 

|070 Dec 9$ 

BX9 51 00 Aua 96 


!?. Y ?; T S^ u,rr tCBOtt iKXMOowin. ini 62»ttiaM*»e, 
f-Jl »MI Dec 94 100- 76 101-01 100-22 100-30 » M 15J9J 
114/ 9LH ilw acim.M im.ui oa m inn_m m imtM 


E st. lu tei Ha Mcrfi sates I8 .bc 
M iortaaonto 62.564 «77» 


•0.14 15^74 

* 0 X 6 18,120 

*0.67 

*022 9X83 
*0X8 5X05 
USB 
*0J8 1X12 

'2S 824 

•oa 

-058 

•AM 

-0J8 833 


6005 

J5.1JFcb9S 3M5 

a*5 

38X2 

3BJ3 

-0.10 

L77J 


34 99MO y*5 39.00 

39.90 

PM 

30X5 

—0X5 

543 


37KJLH 71 *40 

41.10 

4045 

41.10 

-0X0 

579 


14.70 AM 91 *.10 

*10 

PM 

39.70 

-0J7 

ns 

50.50 

39 59 Fm 96 4.D 

*78 

*32 

cj: 

—0-53 

19 

59.90 

30X0 MW *4 



47X2 

-Oil 

9 


; rji 2-w we 96 100-76 im-01 100-22 idd-jd » o* 1SJ»S 

I'-® 5-tt Mcr *5100-01 1Q8-10 99-29 100-dl- 01 246JB9 

«+« 2‘P Jun 95 99-20 99-24 99-U 99-14— 02 7,939 

?!-» JT-11 Sea 93 99-05 - 03 7 

110-31 96-30 Dec 95 98-30 — 04 25 

F« HOT NA MOR'LsdeS 4I.SU 
UP 2904 

l» TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) p pc^ltoJBFcW C »*.« OTM1 
!i’ 5 Pec 94 100- W 100-14 100-05 100-11 * 01 17X57 

tiS Mor ta 99-22 99-27 09-14 99-14- 04 30X5* 

S- 19 »«-l7 Jun 95 99X8 99-12 90X2 99X3 - 05 11784 

2. 5 94-10 Sep 95 98-2* 99HD 98-25 98-23 - 07 B94 

J-fe VtV, 98-23 10-18 90-18 - 07 2*7 

114-06 93-13 Mar 96 90-12 — 07 (7 

100-70 ta-06 JU196 90415 — 07 27 

*3-05 Saata 97-29 - IP 18 

Esr.uMH NA Man's, solfs IJ«09 
““ iSSfnW 384.734 aft 4542 
WMIOTAL BONDS (CBOH lian.iodrM«t»*<4l«to* 

91-17 80-11 Dec 94 84-77 85-0* 84-25 85-01 * 05 SX27 

*X9 79.28 MOT 95 84-20 84-15 M-Z2 «JM 

E« hot na Mvi'v sates WT9 
Men oCOTi tftl 34.309 up 103 

92150 92.940 92830 92.910 •«».!£ 

? ? 10Jto*i 92X20 92J10 92.190 92^0 *555.138 

94550 91.J10SCP95 71X79 91950 91X20 91X10 -W27S.964 


Esi.saws 1J74 Men's so»s I.MJ 
Man's open to 9X46 off 140 


67* 681 

7300 7300 
SSJ 053 




.Z5 9*9 

1078 1060 
678 660 

1209 1266 


corpse c <Ncse> u.teotoi- ™»o«t 

74400 TiflDMOr** 156. ID 147.00 IJ640 

744 40 njOMay 05 158.90 162.70 158JC 
745 19 85X0 Jul *5 ISO’S IUJ0 l»J» 

738X0 1 51 40 Sec ta 16050 161* ICC. JO 
23150 1S1JSM0 06 IJ9J0 160X0 150 JO 
170.00 17f.0O*tar« _ 

Ell. SOTS 6,675 MOTTS votes 6.386 
Man's open uv 31X60 UP 4*9 
SUGAR-WORLD 11 [NCSEi iiTOTn*.. cwn 
1538 10 56 Mar <5 I4.7B M18 1478 

15 37 1 0.57 Mar 95 »05 ISO 1445 


161-65 >7X0 >7JI s 

142 JO ‘920 6.496 
163.40 <2 00 7415 

1615D • l.k) 7.755 

162X0 -US 29J 

161.15 • 735 76 


taB 

14.94 • oot »s.rs 

1100 0 13 17.586 


Stock Indexes 

ta.SvSS iFSiS SSg - 1 -® 20X486 
26440 293X0Mvta mk 2S7-» 254X5 -0J0 1 


•00502.162 

•20347,728 


Commodity Indexes 

Moody's . Pmg 

Reuters MjW 

D J. Futures *]»S5 

Com. Reseorcft 


Previous 

lrCtLOO 

2 . 1 BM 0 
IS MS 
231.95 


‘ r, fr.tr. ■ 


i>ejl) 







'-t\ * 


K*| 










• • . t>- \ ! r .. 


-fi'" 



** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1994 



Money Growth 
I* 1 Germany Hits 
Range 


Page 11 

EUROPE 


Ctmpiled Jw Ota- Staff Front Dispatches 

. F^AMKFU rt - Growth 

ir Pply S,owed in 

November falling within the 
Bundesbank s target range for 
the first tune this year, the Ger- 
man cot tral bank said Tuesday. 


many economists now expect 

£«„ bank L 10 kee P toe target 
range unchanged at 4 percent to 
6 percent for 1995. 

Analysts said the latest figure 
was unlikely to trigger a cut in 
interest rales at this week’s 


, ‘ uesd ay. interest rales at this wed 
«™2H Bll ? d ? bailk said annual Bundesbank council meeting. 
SSffLg M -3 measure. “If .he taESJTKS* 


— , v ,u again, wmcn I 

shon-'t^r^„7' ,eral J - Vunds of 3™ is now a 40 percent 
snort term and medium-term Chance, they will wait for posi- 
SlnwivH lr» An live sinu fmm ..... l 


• , ■ — 1 utlOJ U I f t- 1 

bank deposits, slowed to 6.0 
P ercen t in November from 6.8 
percent in October, just reach- 
ing the top of its target range of 
4 percent to 6 percent. 

The Bundesbank uses the 
money supply to detect signs of 
inflation and to help guide its 
management of German inter- 
est rates. The M-3 aggregate has 
been growing above its target 
range since 1990. 

But economists said the cen- 
tral bank could only claim half 
a victory, pointing out that 
mere was still enough surplus 
liquidity in the economy to fuel 
inflation. 

Although money-market 
funds, which are relatively new 
in Germany, are just as liquid as 

th# rack J ■_ . ■ 


. • "V JWi pwi- 

uve signs from the wage round 
next year." Annin Kayser, an 
economist at Swiss Bank Corp„ 
said, referring to labor-manage- 
ment talks on wage increases. 

The Bundesbank attributed 
the slowed growth in November 
t o in creased investment in long- 
term instruments. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg. AFP ) 

■ VW to Poet a Small Profit 

Volkswagen AG said it ex- 
pected to report a “small prof- 
it” for 1994, after a net loss of 
1 .94 billion Deutsche marks ($ I 
billion) the previous year, news 
agencies reported from Wolfs- 
burg. Germany. 

VW said it expected parent- 
company sales to reach 42 bil- 
lion DM, a slight increase from 


Russia Batters De Beers 

Maverick Diamond Sales Squeeze CSO 


Reuters 

LONDON — De Beers Consolidated 
Mines Ltd on Tuesday reported a fall in sales 
of rough diamonds through its Central Selling 
Organization hurt by sales of Russian gems 
outside its network. 

The South African company said demand 
in the first half of 1994 was buoyant but that 
the outbreak of plague in India’ and sales of 
Russian gems outside the Central Selling Or- 
ganization, through which De Beers domi- 
nates the world diamond market, had hit 
revenue in the second half. 

But the market for jewdzy stayed resilient 
amid tough trading conditions, said the com- 
pany. Sales of rough diamonds fell by 2.7 
percent, in 1994 to $4.25 billion, De Beers said. 

De Beers has been fighting a running battle 
against the sales of Russian diamonds, which 
the industry estimated amounted to about 
$500 million in the first half of the year. It has 
held talks with officials in Moscow over the 
persistent sales and the renewal of a five-year 
agreement that expires next year. The current 
deal commits Russia to sell 95 percent of all 
its rough diamonds through the Central Seli- 


tussia is the world’s second-largest pro- 
ducer of diamonds, after De Beers, with a 
stockpile estimated at around $5 billion. 

After good demand in the Hist six months, 
the Central Selling Organization cut supplies in 


the second half due to a buildup in stocks at 
diamond-cutting centers and concern cm the 
profitability of cutting houses, said De Beers. 

“Other factors which served to affect trade 
were the outbreak of pneumonic plague in 
India and continuing evidence of Russian 
rough diamonds being sold direct to the out- 
side market,” the company said. 

The Surat area in western India, where the 
plague outbreak was centered, has the world's 
largest concentration of diamond processors, 
and the disruption there meant stocks had 
piled up. 

De Beers said any significant 
overall diamond sales depended on the 
pean and Japanese consumer markets. But it 
said retail demand in these areas was weak in 
local-currency terms, although there were 
signs of recovery. 

The full year fall came after the Central 
Selling Organization sold a record $2.6 billion 
of diamonds in the fust half of the year. 

De Beers said the performance of jewelry* 
held up well amid the overall market fall, with 
retail demand in East Asia staying high and 
the United Slates showing improvement. 

De Beers said roughly half of CSO dia- 
monds go for industrial uses and 12 to 14 
percent end up as jewellery. However, in 
terms of value the jewellery market accounts 
for up to 90 percent of the sales. 


Paris Offers 
Comptoir 
A Lifeline 


lion DM. a slight increase from 
deposi ? tout last year, and parent-company 
52522*1 for exam P le -, toe profit to rise to at least 100 
Bundrabank hasnoiyet mclud- million DM from 71 million 


EU Money Chief Sees Currency Delay 


- “VI JVV UIVIUU- 

ed them m its M-3 calculations. 

Thomas Mayer, an econo- 
mist at Goldman, Sachs & Co., 
said M-3 would have grown at a 
7 percent rate in November if 
money-fund certificates — 
included. 


were 


Despite heavy speculation 
early this 


„ speci 

— j — year that the Bundes- 
bank would abandon its 20- 
year-old practice of setting tar- 
gets for money-supply growth. 


DM in 1993. 

The automaker said its SEAT 
unit in Spain and Skoda opera- 
tion in the Czech Republic were 
the only subsidiaries that would 
not “take part in this positive 
development,” 

The company previously said 
only a “break-even” 1994 
would result from its cost-cut- 
ting efforts and improved sales. 

(AFX, Bloomberg) 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The Europe- 
an Union is likely to have to 
wait until 1999 to get its single 
currency because the necessary 
number of countries will not be 
ready before then, the head of 
the European Monetary Insti- 
tute said Tuesday. 

“I would say that while I 
would not rule out 1997 as a 
possibility, it does not seem very 
plausible because of the majority 
danse,” Alexandre Lamfalussy 
told the European Parliament's 
economic and monetary com- 


mittee, referring to the Treaty on 
European Union. 

“But there is no majority 
clause in 1999, so that seems 
more realistic,” he added. 

Under the Maastricht treaty, a 
angle currency may be created 
at the be ginning of 1997 until 
1999 only if a majority of EU 
member states meet the econom- 
ic convergence criteria on infla- 
tion, currency stability, interest 
rates, debts and deficits. 

Mr. Lamfal ussy’s views con- 
tradict those of the European 


Commission, which said In its 
annual economic report this 
month that with a bit of effort, a 
majority of countries could 
meet the criteria in 1997. 

He also stud that creation of a 
single currency would not be 
possible unless EU unemploy- 
ment was cut drastically. 

“I find it difficult to imagine 
setting up a genuine monetary 
union and. having it function 


Comptoir 
LOS bfflic 


property with the high levels of 

mempkr 


unemployment we have now,’ 
he said. “They are very disrup- 
tive.” 


posted losses of 
lion francs in 1992, 825 
milli on francs in 1993 and 348 
million francs in the first half of 
1994. Chairman Francois Le- 
masson told shareholders that 
Compton’s 1994 net loss was 
likely to be similar to last year’s. 


NYSE 


Tkoidmy'i Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 



Htoh LmvSfadc Div 



SWATCH: GLAXO: 


France Wins Job GATT Is a Tonic 


Continued from Page 9 
portance as the company's sec- 
ond-largest export market as a 
factor in the company’s deri- 
sion. 

“I have little understanding 
for seeing such decisions viewed 
through nationalist glasses,” he 
said last week in Stuttgart. 
“Think of Fiance's importance 
as a market-” 

The federal government ap- 
parently agrees. Germany is not 
particularly concerned because 
jobs will be created “on and 
around the border” between 
France and Germany, said 
Nor bert Schaefer, a spokesman 
for Chancellor Helmut Kohl 

Across the border, mean- 
while, Phfllipe Leroy, chairman 
of the Moselle regional council, 
told Agence France-Presse that 
“one could not dream of a bet- 
ter Christmas present” for a re- 
gion that has lost 30,000 jobs 
over the past 15 years. 


Continued from Page 9 
cation and challenging the com- 


pany's patents in U.S. courts. 


. patent law changed 
when Coi 


ongress ratified the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade, which stipulates 
that all patents for participating 
countries carry a standard du- 
ration of 20 years from the ap- 
plication filing date. 

Patents in the United States 
previously were valid for 17 
years from the lime the patent 
was issued. In order to comply 
with GATT, the United States 
said it would honor patents for 
the longer duration of 20 years 
from the filing date or 17 years 
from the issue date of a patent. 

While the law comes just in 
time for Glaxo, it comes too late 
for the rival British drug maker 
SmitbKlme Beech am PLC. The 
U.S. patent on SmilbKline’s 
anti-ulcer medication Tagamet 
expired earlier this year. 


in eoMboratfon with 

BEAWUVAC3E PA1ACE A k ANA GRAND HOTH WEN 


VIENNA COMES TO LAUSANNE 


Imperial Vienna on New Year’s Eve 
Saturday December 31st, 1994 


Come and enjoy this very 
special evening with us / 


For further information please call 
Tel. 41 -21 -61 3.33.33 or fax 41 -21 -61 3.33.34 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE PURCHASERS 
OF NON VOTING SHARES OF 


INTERMINING INTERNATIONAL SJL 
(IMISA) 

Registered In Panama City, Republic of Panama 
formerly 


INTERMINING MUTUAL FUND S.A. 
(IMFSA) 


that in accordance with applicable laws, rules and regulations, 
the Company resolved at a special meeting of the Board of 
Directors to cancel and replace all provisional purchase 
documents issued to date with the final INTERMINING 
INTERNATIONAL SA. (IMISA) share certificates. 

Therefore, an concerned parties are kindly requested to 
exchange their provisional purchase documents for the final 


share certificates by sen ding them by registered mail to the 
REGISTRAR AND TRANSFER AGENT of the Company at the 


following address: 

GENERAL TRUST TRANSFER AGENT AND REGISTRY LTD. 
Chambers of Rene Baptiste, Notary Public 
Blue Cari bb e a n Building - P.O. Box 577 
Kingstown 
AfHEGRE 


SAINT VINCENT A THE GRENADINES (W.L) 
Panama City, 14th. December 1994 


This prestigious conference will assess the 
new developments in France following the 
Presidential elections and will feature key 


members of the new government in addition 
,o major industrialists and finance and 


government leaders from around the world. 


THE NEW FRANCE 

Implications Jot Global Business 


LE GRAND HOTEL, PARIS 
OCTOBER 17-18, 1995 


Hcral b^S Sribunc 





V 


7 


B lo omber g Business Sews 

PARIS — The government 
and the state-owned insurer As- 
surances Generates de France 
unveiled a rescue package Tues- 
day for the real-estate financin g 
company Comptoir des Entre- 
preneurs. 

Under the plan, announced 
at a meeting of Comptoir share- 
holders, bad loans totaling 7 
billion francs ($13 billion) will 
be transferred to a company set 


up especially for the rescue, and 
Comr 


iptoir nil] receive 13 bil- 
lion francs from the state and 
AGF in the next two years. 

The plan could remove a 
shadow over AGF, which owns 
29.7 percent of Comptoir, and 
dear the way for the long- 
planned sale of shares in AGF 
to private investors. Finance 
Minister Edmond Alphandriy 
has said an AGF sale could go 
ahead in early 1995. 

Analysts said the govern- 
ment’s willingness to help 
Comptoir showed it was doing 
its utmost to speed the sale. 

“The government seems to be 
moving to privatize AGF be- 
fore CNP,” Derek Elias, an in- 
dustry analyst at Paribas Capi- 
tal Markets in London, said 
before details of the package 
were revealed. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 

FTSE 100 index 



A SO NO 
1994 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Index 

■AEX 

Tuesday 
Close ■■ 

41064 

Prev, • . 
Close 

410.85 ! 

% 

Change 

-0.05 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

7,174250 

7.20871 

-0.47 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2^79.93 

2JJ75-94 

*0.19 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

77009 

778.40 

-0.04 

MotsJnki 

HEX 

1y814^9 

1,815^0. 

-04)7 

London 

Financial Timas 30 

2,349.90 

2,329.10 

+0,88 

London 

FTSE 700 

3458.10 

3,034.40 

+0.78 

Madrid 

General Index 

294.46 

297.46 

-1.01 

MSan 

WBTH. 

$855.00 

9,744,00 

+tja 4, 

Paris 

CAC40 

1,92472 

1,928.09 

-0.17 

Stockholm 

AJfaerswaertden 

1,848.52 

1,844.73- 

-tO.to'. 

Vienna 

ATX Index 

1,035.31 

1.035.35 

Urtcik 

Zurich 

SSS 

*21.52 

917.68 

+0.42 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


[mrnmimnal Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


French data revealed mixed signals as manufactured output fell 

t C • A— -.1 _ Cm J » f\ A _ • n - 9 


03 percent in October after dropping 0.4 percent in September. 

ember after 


while household consumption rose 1.7 percent in Novem 
it had fallen 2.5 percent in October. 


• Anglo Irish Bank Corp. said it bought the loan portfolio of Irish 
Business Bank, the Dublin-based subsidiary of Britain's TSB 
Group PLC for 1 16 million punts ($176 million). 


CNP, or Caisse Nation ale de 
Prevoyance, is the other state- 
owned insurer due to be sold 
soon to the public, but analysts 
said the government had been 
discouraged by political prob- 
lems surrounding that company. 


• Union Bancatre Privfe, a major Swiss asset-management bank, 
said it would tighten its checks on clients after a U.S. money- 
laundering probe led to the arrest of one of its executives. Swiss 
police have frozen an account allegedly used to funnel drug 
proceeds and other funds. 


• Groupe Danone said it bought 82.6 percent of Bolshevik. 
Russia’s biggest biscuit manufacturer. The remaining stake is held 
by the company’s employees and Russian investors. 


• Kirin Brewery Co. said it reached agreement with France's 
Sanofi SA to acquire Barbenet A Mane SA, Sanofi's Spanish- 
based supplier of carnation flowers. 


• Spain’s gross domestic product rose by 23 percent in the third 
quarter from the figure for the like period of last year. 

Bloomberg. AP, Reuters, AFX. AFP 


Banknote Firm Bids to Grow 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — De La Rue 
PLC, the world’s leading bank- 
note printer, said Tuesday it 
was making a friendly bid 
worth £682 million ($1.06 bil- 
lion) for Portals Group PLC 
which specializes in paper for 
banknotes and passports. 

The companies had agreed to 
a takeover in May, but the deal 
was abandoned later that 
month. The concerns reopened 
negotiations this month. 


De La Rue said it was offer- 
ing cash and new stock worth 
£10.50 for each Portals com- 
mon share, or a full-cash pay- 
ment of £10.1 15 pence. 

De La Rue fell by 16 pence, 
to 940, while Portals rose by 59 
pence, to 1,024 pence. 

De La Rue’s chairman. Lord 
Limerick, said the acquisition 
would allow the development of 
world-class anti-counterfeiting 
techniques. 

(AFP, Reuters, Bloomberg) 




Capital J’bnr^gset Management 


Nasm’. Bwluus 

$32^817.04 


• 

NET REALIZED rXOFrre 


inquaift: 

PER 5100000 UNDER MANAG8MENT 


Jtoomsfc: (*09> 39.4S2S4 
‘tchphonr. (1) (809) 3938777 

June 27 , 1994 through Octuhhr 31, 1994 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


'SrariiTEzr 


FUTURES LIMITED 


SFA & IPE 
MEMBER 


* 24 Hour margin based foreign exchange dealing 

* Fust competitive rates with a personalised service 

* Catering only to professional investors. Fund managers 
and institutions, for their speculative & hedging needs 

* Up to date market information and technical analysis 

* Full futures brokerage in all major markets 

33 Cavendish Square Loudon WIM 9HF 

Reuters Periling: SABX. Reuters Monitor SABY/Z i+ Daily fat) 
Tel.: |(I7 1 1 J 1 2 1)001 Fax: (07 ) i 4 12 0003 
Please caU for further information. 


CURRENCY & FUTURES TRADERS 

WflENCIESwiiMpeoiK«den boo IBM COMPUTER PROQ8AM whidic . 

. .. . r . won moon p®t«r far ] 7 wcxvFWimbrltiS 8500ft er lease lu-USi IS 

3 mcrttn Tenns c*r mofctfc J Aka aralAfc safe-. Krvico wA NDENTCAL tnxW 2 ma+s ■ 

* DAILY FAX SUVKt hr 38 Mums ■ foufion (rads «n* specific ertries/aatt/ttops. 

Pvofii hi pad 6 nwnMv. iwwis S ICO .000 btxtnq ono cental Ear wen nd 
S c h qibn far Tmonlha tor US5 2.500; or 6 raontittorUS& ft.300. or I year far S1ZDOO. 

1 • N0TS: EACH HAS FUU. MWEY-BACK GUARANTY. W» m net CIA's, de ndjnmw mb. npm doe 
.MANASEP ACCOUNTS (nsnarun US515.000) mi obou( CUSTOM PROGRAMSfar TOuRmn* fatal., 
CaB 305-251-6762 or 800-392-2664 - Fax:305-254-3272 

LIMITED AVAILABLY ACThlCWll 




Everyday Offer Jo Professional Traders 

US CoamoUtly E tthin g— 

800-967-4B79 
312-207-0117 


Fa AiruuaaLQpiora 
Jtmd bn Fen 


m 




Currency Management Corporation Plc 
11 Old Jewry - London EC2R 8DU 
Tel_- 071-865 0800 Fax.- 071-972 0970 


MARGIN FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Dally Fax Sheet 

Cull fur further infurniatlon bmchtrre 



For JUrtber details 
on bow to place your listing contact 
WILL NICHOLSON in London 
TeL : (*4) 71 836 48 02 
Fax: (44) 71 2402254 


HcralbSg^ribimc 


FOR FURTHER DETAILS, 
PLEASE CONTACT: 


Fiona Cowan 

International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71)836 0717 


J 5 


J 

* 

i- 


-I «*£' 


\ 

































































































lj-* ij£o 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1994 


Japanese Car Imports 
To Cool Torrid Growth 


Page 13 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


* Or Su ff From Dtspatrhes 

gSHaSS 

k..iSs/, t*™ - 

aSata 

>»,ooo imported vehicles 
would be sold in 1995, breaW 
this year’s record for salSS 
mated at 300,000. ^ 1 

Sales of imported cars, trucks 
and buses have been rising for 
JUnonths, largely because the 
strong yen makes imported cars 
inexpensive and because many 

deale^TowTrc 

selling, foreign cars. 

‘‘We re seeing more Japanese 
manufacturers either encourage 
or allow their affiliated dealers 
to handle other manufacturers' 
air hnes,” said Andrew Blair- 
bmith, an analyst at the broker- 
age wncern Barclays de Zoete 
■ U V- M ** example, he said. 
’ Jis means “you will see more 
Fords sold through Nissan 
I dealerships." 

Sales of Japanese cars also 
are rising, as the market began 
to recover this summer from a 
three-year slump. Consumer 
spending is expected to increase 
next year, the association said. 


rebare l3ecause income-lux 

The projection for 1995 is 
nased on persistent strong de- 
mand for recreational vehicles 
. r P r L inexpensive models. 
• he higher end of the market 
win remain difficult but is likely 
to rise along with Japan’s econ- 
°my the association said. 

Still, foreign cars, with a 6 
percent market share, are rare 

Nissan Forecasts 
A Sales Rebound 

The A undated ?rw 

TOKYO — Nissan Motor 
t-o., Japan’s second-largest 
automaker, predicted Tuesday 
a turnaround in its sales and 
vehicle production, which have 
fallen Inis year. 

Nissan projected a 12 percent 
nse in domestic sales in 1995. to 
1-18 million vehicles, after an 
estimated 4.4 percent decline in 
1994 from the previous year. 
Worldwide production was ex- 
pected to increase 10.7 percent, 
to 2.9 million vehicles, after a 7 
percent decline this year. 

On Monday, Toyota Motor 
Corp., Japan’s largest automak- 
er, said it expected a 10 percent 
increase in domestic sales in 
1995. to 2.24 million vehicles. 


in Japan — a country that ex- 
ports about 14 limes’ as many 
cars as H imports. Moreover, 
one-quarter of the so-called im- 
ports are cars made overseas by 
Japanese companies. Honda 
Motor Co. has sold more im- 
ported cars in Japan this year 
than any other company — 
more than General Motors 
Corp., Ford Motor Co. and 
Chrysler Corp. combined. 

Sales of foreign-made Hondas 
rose 65 percent in the first 11 
months ai 1994, compared with 
a year earlier, to 42,876 units. In 
November alone, Mercedes- 
Benz AG of Germany led all 
importers, followed by Honda. 

Honda's Accord station wag- 
on. which is enormously popu- 
lar in Japan, is made only at 
Honda's factory in Ohio. The 
company started making the 
Accord wagon in the United 
States because it intended the 
model primarily for the Ameri- 
can market. To Honda's sur- 
prise, however, its sales took off 
in Japan. 

Sales in Japan by the Big 
Three American automakers, 
meanwhile, totaled only 31.017 
units in the first 11 months. 
That was an 83 percent gain 
from a year earlier but still ac- 
counted for only 12 percent of 
the 269,568 cars imported into 
Japan. ( Bloomberg, AFP) 


Chirm to Soak Up Cash With Bonds 


Confuted by Otr Staff From Dispatch a 

BEIJING — Seeking to soak up rysh that 
could fuel inflation, the Chinese government 
expects to increase its bond sales next year by up 
to 50 percent over the 1994 level, the official 
China Securities newspaper reported Tuesday. 

The State Information Center, an arm of the 
State Planning Commission, forecast the govern- 
ment would issue a maxiumum of ISO billion 
yuan ($1 7.3 billion) in Treasury bonds next year 
in an attempt to curb inflation to 10 percent and 
hold economic growth to 9 percent to 1 0 percent, 
the paper said. The nationwide inflation rate was 
27 percent in November, while the economy is 
expected to expand by 1 1 percent to 12 percent. 

Securities analysts said an issue that ^laige. 
compared with 100 billion yuan this year and 30 
billion yuan in 1993, would depress prices on 
China’s infant securities markets and slow the 
'^rconomy by curbing consumer spending. 

“I think the government will continue to soak 
up liquidity in ways it sees fit and that will 
probably depress the stock market,”- said Eliza- 


beth Cheng, director of China research at James 
Capel & Co„ Asia. 

Chinese investors will continue to stash their 
money in banks rather than speculate cm the stock 
market next year, the information center forecast. 

In another development, China will issue in- 
ternational bonds in early 1995 to raise some of 
the S3 billion in foreign funds it needs to build 
the Three Gorges power plant drat will dam the 
Yangtze River, officials said Tuesday. 

The dam, China’s largest engineering project 
since the Great Wall, will cost 146.8 billion yuan, 
including inflation and interest costs, up from a 
baric price tag of 90 billion yuan, it was an- 
nounced at a news conference. 

China plans to raise 21 percent — or more 
than S3 billion — of that sum overseas and is 
already in talks with Merrill Lynch & Co., Gold- 
man, Sachs & Co. and Morgan Stanley & Co. on 
details of issuing international bonds, the deputy 
director of the State Council Three Gorges Pro- 
ject Construction Committee said. 

Other foreign funds would come from com- 
mercial loans. , 

(Bloomberg. Reuters) 


Tokyo Loosens 
Listing Rules 
For Foreign Firms 


Reuters 

TOKYO — The Tokyo 
Stock Exchange announced 
Tuesday new listing require- 
ments "for foreign compa- 
nies, aiming to lure Asian 
firms to trade their shares in 
Tokyo. . 

“We had intended to relax 
the requirements to make 
them similar to those on the 
New York exchange,” said 
the exchange’s president, 
Mitsuhide Yamaguchi. “I 
believe the new require- 
ments meet our intention." 
They will take effect on Jan. 
I, he said. 

The Finance Ministry sep- 
arately said it has approved 
new requirements on corpo- 
rate disclosure for foreign 
companies to help them trade 
their shares here, effective 
Jan. 1. 

Current guidelines for the 
listing of foreign shares focus 
on industrialized countries' 
companies, which have been 
leaving the exchange in re- 
cent years partly because of 
the high cost of maintaining 
listings, industry sources 
said. Listings on the Tokyo 
exchange's foreign section 
are expected to fall to 91 by 
January from the December 
1991 peak of 127, they said. 

No companies from other 
Asian countries are now list- 
ed in Tokyo. The exchange 
has not officially haired the 
listing of Asian shares, but in 
the past it has rejected such 
companies through guidance 
to Japanese underwriters. 

Major points of the new 
listing requirements for for- 
eign companies are: • 

• Foreign companies will 
be able to trade Lheir shares 
on the exchange even if they 
are not traded on exchanges 
in their home countries. 

• Charges for appraising 
the eligibility of listing will be 
cut to 1 mfllion yen ($10,000) 
from the current 2 million 
yen. 

• The initial cost of listing 
will be lowered to 2.5 million 
yen from the current 5 mil- 
lion yen, and the remaining 
cost of listing will be cut 
according to the number of 


shares a company lists on 
the exchange. 

• Minimum net assets re- 
quired will be lowered to 10 
billion yen from the current 
100 billion yen. Minimum 
pretax profit will be cut to 2 
billion yen for each of the 
three years before the listing 
from the current 20 billion. 

• The contents of finan- 


?r We had Intended 
to relax the 
requirements to 
make them similar to 
those on the New 
Y ork exchange. 99 


dal statements which for- 
eign companies listed on the 
Tokyo Stock Exchange must 
submit will be simplified. 
The number of items that 
need to be translated into 
Japanese will be reduced to 
cut costs. 

• The minimum trading 
unit wall be cut to 500,000 
yen from the current 3 mil- 
lion yen to help attract in- 
vestors. 

• A new trading unit of 
500 shares will be created in 
addition to the current units 
of 1,000, 100, 50, 10 and one 
share. The change in the 
trading units will be effec- 
tive from Feb. I. 

■ Jakarta Cots Red Tape 

Indonesia, long criticized 
for excessive red tape, has 
vowed to streamline licensing 
procedures after riding a re- 
cord wave of foreign invest- 
ment approvals this year, the 
Antara news agency said 
Tuesday in Jakarta, Reuters 
reported. 

Industry Minister Tunky 
Ariwibowo, quoted by An- 
tara, said Indonesia would 
also issue more reform pack- 
ages in line with a free-trade 
agreement reached by Aria- 
Pacific nations Iasi month. 


Lehman 
Calls Reply 
To Its Suit 
'Ridiculous* 


Compiled by Chir Staff Fran Dispatihes 

HONG KONG — Lehman 
Brothers Inc. on Tuesday reject- 
ed as “absolutely ridiculous" 
charges made against it by a 
state metals- trading concern in 
China that Lehman is suing. 

The response to Lehman’s 
$52 million lawsuit over trading 
debts “betrays an active imagi- 
nation but absolutely no under- 
standing of the relevant facts,” 
a spokesman for the US. secu- 
rities bouse said. 

Lehman last month sued Min- 
inetals International Non-Fer- 
rous Metals Trading Co. and its 
parent company, China Nation- 
al Metals & Minerals Import & 
Export Co. in federal court in 
New York. In a separate suit, 
Lehman sought $44 million from 
an oil-trading company, China 
United Petroleum Chemicals. 

I-ehman said the Chinese 
companies had failed to meet 
their obligations after running 
up losses in foreign -exchange 
and swap transactions. 

On Monday, Minmetals 
threatened to countersue Leh- 
man, saying it had given the 
Chinese companies improper 
advice and had lured an inexpe- 
rienced employee into improp- 
erly risky transactions. 

The public exchange of re- 
marks heightened a conflict be- 
tween Beijing and the New 
York-based securities firm that 
some analysts say has helped to 
erode confidence in the Chinese 
business system. (Reuters, AFP) 

■ Aroo to Explore Off China 

Atlantic Richfield Co. will 
explore for oil and gas near Chi- 
na’s largest gas field in the 
South China Sea, Bloomberg 
Business News reported. 

An agreement between the 
U.S. ofl concent and China Na- 
tional Offshore Oil Co. allows 
Arco to explore a 510-square- 
kjlometer (195-square-mile) 
area. Block 63-20, which lies 
100 kilometers south of Sanya, 
a city in Hainan Province. 

The block is near Yacheng 13- 
1, a huge gas field Arco discov- 
ered while searching for oil in 
1983. Arco has contracts to 
pump that field's estimated 100 
billion cubic meters (3.53 trillion 
cubic feet) of gas. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

11000 


Singapore 
Straits Times 


Tokyo . 
Nikkei 225 




■% 


? «»JASOND 2000 a AS 

1994 1994 


Exchange 


Hong Kong Hang Seng 

Singapore Straits Timas 

Sydney Ml Ordinaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuata Lumpur Composite 
Bangkok SET 

Seoul Composite Stock 

Taipei Weighted Price 

Manila PSE 

Jakarta Stock Index 

New Zealand NZSE-40 

Bombay National Index 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


Ml Ordinaries 
Nikkei 225 


O N D j A S O N D 

1994 

Tuesday Prev. % 

Close Close Change 

8^67.33 8,178.34 +1.09 

2,183.46 2.185.19 -0.08 

1,898.60 1.900.00 -0.07 

19,406.98 19,270.85 +0.71^ 

966.19 957.25 +053 

1,352.68 1,337.78 +1.11 

1,023-99 1,028.61 -0.45 

6,925.28 7,055.30 -1.84 

2,740.04 2,723.60 +0.60 


1,352.68 

1,023.99 

&K&28 

2,740.04 

462.78 

1,93a 50 

1,856.12 


1 .9Z7.39 +0.16 

1,858,35 -6.01~ 

)niiTn3th<r.l1 ll.'rald 1 nhuiw 


Very briefly: 

• Arias&t, a Hong Kong-based satellite company, postponed the 
launch of a commercial satellite, scheduled for next spring, for 
three months while scientists investigate the loss of contact with a 
similar satellite launched in September by AT&T Corp. 

• Legend Holdings LtdL’s net profit rose 2 1 percent, to 30.5 million 
Hong Kong dollars ($4 billion), in the sly months ended Sept. 30. 
as the Chinese personal-computer maker increased its share of 
China’s rapidly growing market to 8 percent from 7.5 percent. 

• Hong Kong’s manufacturing industries received 40.9 billion 
dollms of foreign investment in 1993. up 10 percent from a year 
earlier, and the number of foreign companies represented in the 
territory was up 26 percent in mid- 1994 from a year earlier. 

• Taiwan said it had received a one-month record of $8.6 billion of 
business orders from abroad in November. 

Reuters, Bloomberg, Knight- Ridden AP. AFP 

Seoul Firm Makes Deal With North 


Reuters 

SEOUL — South Korea’s 
Ssangyong group said Tuesday 
that it has agreed to import ce- 
ment from North Korea, the 
first direct North-South deal 
since Seoul lifted a two-year 
business ban. 

A Ssangyong spokesman said 
the agreement was reached be- 
tween the group’s vice chair- 
man, Lee Chou-bom, and 
North Korean officials during 
his trip to North Korea to dis- 
cuss economic cooperation. Mr. 
Lee returned to Seoul or Mon- 
day after a five-day visit 

He led a 12-person team, the 
first South Korean business- 


men to visit the North since 
Seoul banned practically all 
economic contact with it in late 
1992. 

Seoul last week allowed Ssan- 
gyong and five other South Ko- 
rean companies to visit North 
Korea. In November, it lifted a 
ban on business trips to North 
Korea and allowed local com- 
panies to set up offices there. 

Pyongyang has rejected 
Seoul's proposals for talks with 
the South Korean government 
to facilitate economic lies but 
has indicated that it wants pri- 
vate-level business contacts 
with the South. 


What a 

market. A ter 

. . 

jam. And then, 
about. 






Lufthansa 


Welcome aboard 


^ i_ . . . 













































































































































































































SPORTS 






il 1V 


Cowboys Win, 
But Lose Smith 


The Associated Press 

NEW ORLEANS — At first 
gl ^nrp the Dallas Cowboys ap- 
peared to march merrily to the 
last two Super Bowls and a 12-3 
record this season. 

But it's not easy, not even for 
the Cowboys, 

Monday night, as the Cow- 
boys beat the New Orleans 
Saints, 24-16, they saw Emmiu 
Smith, the league’s lead in g scor- 
er and the heart of their offense, 
wiled 



a 

jy wften uamn Smith 
grabbed his second intercep- 
tion, stopping a late drive. 

Smith went down in the third 
quarter after slipping on the Su- 
perdome turf and p u l lin g his 
left hamstring. 

“I really don’t know what 
happened," Smith said. “I saw a 
big hole and just wanted to get 
through it. My leg just felt like a 
grab, a puD, and that’s it." 

Dallas had already clinched 
the National Football Confer- 
ence East title and the second 
spot in the conference playoffs, 
b ehin d San Francisco. 

It completes its regular sea- 
son Saturday against the New 
York Giants. While the Cow- 
boys are locked into the second 
ition in the NFC, 
knock the Giants out 


seeding posi 
they could ko 


of playoff consideration, just as 
they did New Orleans on Mon- 
day night. 

While the Cowboys worried 
about Smith and what his injury 
might mean to their chances of 
winning a third straight Super 
Bowl, the Saints (6-9) ensured 
their first losing season since 
1986 by allowing two intercep- 
tions for touchdowns. New Or- 
leans also had a defensive 
breakdown to open the second 
half that allowed Dallas to keep 
the football for 8ft minutes. 

Darrin Smith intercepted Jim 
Everett twice in the fourth 
quarter. He returned the first 13 
yards for a touchdown to make 
it 24-9; the second stopped the 
Saints' final drive and ended 
their threat of tying the game. 

Tony Tolbert’s 54-yard inter- 
ception return to opened the 
scoring for Dallas. 

New Orleans had its chances. 
In the second quarter Wayne 
Martin tipped Troy Aikman’s 
pass at the Saints' 32 and Dar- 
ion Conner grabbed it. Conner, 
a linebacker, sped down the 
sideline only to find Larry Al- 
len, a 330-pound rookie tackle 
racing along with him. 

Instead of a touchdown, the 
Saints settled for a 21-yard field 
goaL 



Underdogs Res 



As Top Teams Roll to Victory 


Jim Hkkfefem/Thi' Awcutcd Pm* 


The Cowboys' running back Emmitt Smith fell to the turf after injuring his hamstring. 


The Amomed Press 

Final exams are either going 
on or have Just aided at most 
campuses. Christmas is less 
than a week away. There are not 
supposed to be many good col- 
lege basketball matchups at this 
time of December. 

There were not any good 
ones Monday night as the six 
ranked teams that played won 

COLLEGE BASKETBALL^ 

by an average of 33.8 points. 
The squeaker of the night was 
No. 18 Georgia Tech’s 94-73 
victory over Furman, while the 
most lopsided was No. 13 Cin- 
cinnati's 116-54 disman tling of 
Cal State Northridge. 

“It was good far me,” said 
Cincmnatfs coach. Bob Hug- 
gins. “1 don't know if it was 
good for them, but I had fun.” 

Gncdnnali made quick work of 
the visiting Matadors, setting a 
school record with 65 points in 
the first half as the Beanats took 
a 36-point half time lead. Unlike 
two weeks ago when. Cincinnati 
blew a 20-podnt lead to Canisius 
and lost, the Bearcats opened it 
up even more against Noflhridge. 

Danny Fortson and LaZelle 
Durden each had 24 points for 
Cincinnati, which scored the 
most points in Coach Huggins's 
six years there. 


Unrelenting full-court pres- 
sure intimidated the Matadors, 
who had 17 turnovers in the 
first half and 30 in the game In 
a one-minute span, they failed 
to get past ntideburt on four 
consecutive possessions. 

Michael Dorsey had 15 
points to lead the Matadors. 

No. 9 Duke 99, North Caroli- 
na A <& T 56: The Blue Devils, 
playing in Myrtle Beach, South 
Carolina, won their 93d consec- 
utive home game against a non- 
conference opponent as Chero- 
kee Parks had 19 points to lead 
five double-figure scorers. 
Duke led by 47-18 at halftime, 
holding the Aggies to 4-for-26 
shooting (15.4 percent). John 
Floyd led North Carolina 
A&T with 19 points, all but 
two in the second half. Duke 
was without Ricky Price, a 
freshman forward who sprained 
an ankle in practice Saturday. 
Price, averaging 11.8 points, is 
expected to miss the Blue Dev- 
ils' three games next week. 

No. 14 Syracuse 103, Robot 
Moris 67: In Syracuse, New 
York, the Orangemen forced 16 
turnovers and held Robert 
Morris to 7-for-22 shooting (31 
percent) in the first half as they 
rebounded from being taken to 
overtime by Princeton. John 
Wallace's 16 points led six Syra- 
cuse players in doable figures as 


the Orangemen topped the 100-- 
point mark for the first time this 
season. Gabe Jackson had TO , 
points to lead the Colonials. 

No. 18 Georgia Tech 94,Tte- 
man73: la Atlahtii, Drew Barry 
scored 25 points, James JForrest . 
23 and Travis Best ,22 as the. 
Yellow Jackets broke it open at 
home in rite second half. Fur- 
man scored thfr first three 
points of the second half .to 
close to 43-42, buf .Geraga 
Tech scored the next 10 points, 
with Bairry and Best each hit- ,, 
ting 3-pointers. Jeff Sexton 
scored 18.points to lead the Pal- 
adins. 

No. 22 Virginia l00 r YMI 73: 
Virginia used a 20-3 run late in , 
the first half to take a 51-28 
halftime lead and that cruised 
to the easy home victory in 
Charlottesville. Harold Deane 
had 21 points to lead five Cave- 
liers in double figures. Law? 
reace Guliette scored 32 points, 
for the Keydets, who, lost, their, 
fifth straight. 

No. 23 nfinois 90, Mercer 66: 
In Cham paign, Illinois, The II- 
Hni scored the game’s first ID 
points and led by as manyas36, 
as they won their fifth in a row. 
Bryant Notree, a freshman re- 
serve, led five Illinois players in 
double figures with 15 pants. 
Chance. Solomon scored - 30 . 

tliA Poarc 




A Bit of NFL Playoff Clarity 

Postseason Lineup Begins to Take Shape 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

A week ago the National 
Football League postseason pic- 
ture was a muddled mess of te- 
dious scenarios. But it cleared up 
considerably over the weekend. 

The 49ers, National Football 
Conference West Division 
champions, have home-field ad- 
vantage throughout the play- 
offs. Pittsburgh, which clinched 
the AFC Centra] Division by 
beating Cleveland on Sunday, 
has home-field advantage in the 
AFC. The Browns and Dol- 
phins are in the playoffs. Dallas 
is the only other team in the 
NFC to have clinched a berth. 

There's a good chance that 
the other lour playoff spots 
could go to teams in the NFC 
Central Division. There isn't a 
division champion yet and the 
Vikings (9-6), Bears (9-6). Lions 
(9-6) and Packers (8-7) can all 
make the playoffs by winning 
their last game. 

The Vikings can clinch the 
division title with a victory over 
San Francisco on Monday 
night. They can also clinch the 
division title if they lose to the 
49ers, provided Detriot loses to 
Miami and Chicago loses to 
New England. Green Bay can 
win the title if it beats Tampa 
Bay and the Lions, Vikings and 
Bears all lose. 

If aO four NFC Central rivals 
wixi, all are in, with Minnesota 
taking the division. If any of 


them lose, they’re in danger of 
having the Giants or Cardinals 
steal away the wild-card berth. 

“I would rather be in our sit- 
uation and have the pressure.” 
the Packers' coach, Mike Holm- 
gren, said of Saturday’s game at 
Tampa. “To be able to go into 
the last game of the season with 
a chance to go to the playoffs if 
we win is good. Not every team 
can say that." 

The Vikings might have the 
toughest (ask. They need a fi- 
nal-game victory to finish 10-6 
and win the division. But that 
victory must come against the 
best team in the league, the 
49ers, on Monday night, after 
everyone else has finished. 

And if they lose, while the 
other three Central teams win, 
they could sink to fourth in the 
division, and out of the playoffs 
if Arizona beats Atlanta and 
Dallas beats the Giants. 

Among the grow of uncer- 
tain teams are one that lost sev- 
en straight (the New York Gi- 
ants), one that has done almost 
all its winning behind a backup 
quarterback (the Chicago 
Bears) and one that seems to 
win despite itself (the Los An- 
geles Raiders). 

“There's a lot of football 
left,” said the Patriots’ coach. 
Bill Parcells, who worked his 
miracles in New England much 
quicker than anyone — includ- 
ing, most likely, himself — 


could have foreseen. “When 
you've been in the league as 
long as J have, you retain that 
thought- A lot of things can 
happen in a short time.” 

The Raidas, Chiefs and Pa- 
triots are vying for two wild- 
card spots in the AFC. Los An- 
geles and Kansas City play each 
other. There is still a way for the 
Patriots to win the AFC East 
division and a way they can get 
a first-round bye in the play- 
offs. New England can clinch 
the title with a victory ova the 
Bears and a Miami loss to De- 
troit. The Patriots can even get 
a bye with a victory ova Chica- 
go and losses by Miami and the 
Chargers, who play Pittsburgh. 

In Minnesota, there was opti- 
mistic news on quarterback 
Warren Moon's injured left 
knee. The Vikings listed him as 
questionable for the 49ers after 
a magnetic resonance imaging 
showed only a strained medial 
collateral ligament in his left 
knee. Moon was injured when 
someone fell on his leg in the 
third quarter of Saturday’s 41- 
19 loss to the Lions. 

Privately, Moon was telling 
friends be intends to play Mon- 
day night Publicly, he said: 
“It's an injury that depends on 
how I feel. We're just going to 
takeit day by day and see exact- 
ly how much it tightens up.” 

(NYT.AP, WP) 


SCOREBOARD 


NFL Standings 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
East 



w 

L 

T 

PtS 

PF PA 

r-Mtomf 


4 

0 

MO 362 307 

New England 


6 

0 

400 

338 307 

Buffalo 


8 

0 

447 

331 344 

Indianapolis 


8 

0 

447 277 311 

N.Y. Jets 


9 

D 

400 

254 2 Wi 


Central 




W 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF PA 

x-PIttsburgh 

12 

3 

0 

400 

282197 

y-Oevgtond 

10 

5 

0 

447 

305 ITS 

Cincinnati 

2 

13 

0 

.133 

243 376 

Houston 

1 

M 

0 

467 

202 342 


West 





w 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF PA 

x-San Dleao 

10 

5 

0 

447 

344 272 

LA Raiders 

» 

6 

0 

400 

204 308 

Kansas Cby 

i 

7 

0 

_KD 

300 289 

Denver 

7 

8 

0 

447 

319 364 

Seattle 

4 

9 

g 

400 278 2M 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


East 





W 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF PA 

x-Daltos 

12 

3 

0 

400 404 23] 

N.Y. Giants 

1 

7 

0 

■S33 244 29$ 

Arizona 

8 

7 

0 

-533 

229257 

PhltadelPhlo 

7 

8 

0 

447 

278 275 

Washington 

2 

13 

0 

.133 294 391 

r 

Central 





W 

L 

T 

Ptl PF PA 

AAbinesota 

9 

4 

0 

400 

335 300 

Detroit 

9 

6 

0 

400 337 315 

Chtcogo 

9 

4 

0 

400 

MB 294 

Green Bay 

8 

7 

0 

433 

348 268 

Tampa Bay 

6 

9 

0 

400 

232 317 


West 





W 

L 

T 

Pts 

PF PA 

* -Son Francisco 13 

2 

0 

467 

471 275 

New Orleans 

4 

f 

0 

400 

318 379 

Alton fa 

6 

9 

0 

400 

307 379 

LA Rams 

4 

11 

D 

467 

245 341 


x-cllnchcd division 
v -clinched okryoff spat 

Mender** Came 
Dallas 24. New Orleans 14 

. -AT 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Aftaoffc Df vfstaii 

W L Pet OS 
Orlando 17 S 773 — 

New York 13 9 sn 4W 


Boston 

10 14 

417 

1 

New Jersey 

10 15 

400 

BVz 

Philadelphia 

8 14 

J44 

9 

Washington 

6 14 

300 

10 

Miami 

6 15 

Ceotrat Division 

286 

T0V5 

Indiana 

14 6 

J00 

— 

Cleveland 

15 8 

452 

W 

Char lotte 

12 10 

.545 

3 

Chicago 

11 11 

500 

4 

Detroit 

9 12 

427 

5V: 

Allonta 

9 14 

391 

6V» 

Milwaukee 

7 14 

J33 

7Vj 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Utah 

16 B 

467 

— 

Houston 

13 B 

419 

IV* 

Dallas 

11 8 

479 

vn 

Denver 

12 7 

571 

2*.: 

San Antonio 

11 9 

350 

3 

Minnesota 

5 17 

Pacific Division 

327 

10 

Phoenix 

IB 5 

.783 

— 

Seattle 

14 7 

447 

3 

L-A. Lakers 

13 B 

417 

4 

Portland 

11 9 

-550 

S'* 

Soa amenta 

11 10 

-524 

6 

Golden State 

8 14 

.364 


LJLCffoaers 

3 17 

.136 

W'7 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 


Oevefaad 

15 22 25 

15—77 

CMcago 

16 IS 15 

17-43 


CL: HIII7-143-7 14. Williams 4- 14 2-4 IB; CH: 
Ptopon 4-13 1-4 R Kukoc 5-13 0-0 11. Re- 
bounds— Cleveland 55 (Hill 171. aitawo 51 
(Plppen, Kukoc 7). Assists— Cleveland 17 
(Brandon 51, Chicago 14 (Armstrong 3). 
■ostoe 21 V4 35 IS— U 

Denver 29 17 26 38-104 

B; Fox 4*11 4-4 17, Weslev 1-13 3-5 15; O: 
Abdul- Raul 1 0-15 5-7 37, R. Will lams 7-12 0-1 15. 
RetoaMe— Beslan SO I Ellison SI, Donver 54 
(Mularnbo 8). Assist s . Bo ston 17 (Brawn 4), 
Denver 28 (Pock. AM ul- Ravi 41. 
Washington 27 31 IS 37—102 

Photo IX 13 27 27 25-UJ 

W: Howard 10-14 2-2 22. Cheonev 6-14 44 IS. 
P: Bark lev 4-13 7-? If, Manning 7-11 4-4 1*. 
ReMaads— Washington 45 (Howard Ml. 
Phoenix 53 ( Barkley 131. Asslris— WasntftB- 
ton 31 (Sklles 13). Phoenl* 37 (Johnson ID. 


Top 25 College Results 

Haw Me too 35 hams In The Associated 
Press' men’s college basketball mil land 
Monday; 

f, Duke <4-11 boat North Caroling ALT 99*6. 
Next: vs. lowaat Honolulu. Tuosaa*. Dec. 27; 
II Cincinnati (7-3) beat Cal Slate Northrldge 
114-54. Next: vs. No. 24 California, Wednes- 


day.- M. Syracuse (4-1) beat Robert Morris 
10347. Next: vs. Ha ft Arltcna Thursday. 

IS. Georgia Tech (7.1) beat Furmsi *4-73. 
Next: vv No. Q Cincinnati at Honotuta, 
Wednesday, Dec. 3ii 22, Virginia (4-3) Deed 
VMI 100-73. Next: vs. Stanford. Thursday; 23, 
(moots (W ) mot Mercer *044. Next: vs. Mis- 
souri at St. Lout* Thursday. 

Other Major College Scores 

EAST 

Cornell 80, Hotv Crass 73 
Drexef B4. NOW 42 
Pittsburgh 76. Duouesw 72 
Stanford *7. American U. 71 
SOUTH 

Alabama 71 Cent Florida 60 
Ark.-Ltttle Rock 45. Grumbling St. 42 
Marshall S7. cent. Michigan 74 
Memphis 11*. Florida A&M 54 
M orehea a SI. B1 Kent 74 
SE Louisiana 10ft Southern U. 71 
Virginia Tech Bft E. Tennessee St 44 
Wtnfhran 84. Somforcf 81 

MIDWEST 
Butter 74. DePouw 47 
Cleveland St. 92, Prairie View 4V 
Creighton 74. Bethune-Cookmrai 74 
Indiana St. *4. Campbell 72 
Kansas St. 77, W. Texas AIM 44 
Missouri B7. Liberty 74 
hi. lewa *7. Lens iskmd U. So 
N.C-Greensboro 47. Akron 44 
& Illinois 93. Oral Roberta 7) 

St. Louis 71 Southern Moth. 67 * 
Wlv-Graen Bov 76, Morgan SI. 4S 
Xavier. Ohio 77, Dayton 73 
SOUTHWEST 

Houston 72. Houston Baptist 63 
Oklahoma 7|. Mount st. Marys, Md. 47 
Texas aim 77. McNeese 51. 68 
Texas Christian ill, Sam Houston St. *4 
Texas Southern 7i Texas- Pen American 73 
FAR WEST 

Ganxaga 74. Canisius 63 
Oregon 77, Seattle 84 

TOURNAMENTS 
Aloha Classic 
First Rouad 

East Carolina 49, E. Illinois 63 
N. Arlrona S3. Chomlnode 44 



ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Southampton ft Aston Villa I 
Standings: Blackburn 43 points. Mmches- 
fer Uniterm, Newcastle jft Nottingham For- 
est 35. Liverpool 31 Leeds 31. Norwich 30. 
Manchester City 2& Chelsea 28, Tottenham 36, 
Arsenal 34. Southam p ton 2ft Coventry 3ft 


Quaora Park Ronoari 22, WtmMedon 22, Crys- 
tal Palace 21, West Ham 71 .Sheffield Wednes- 
day 21, Evurtan 17, Asian Villa 1 ft Leicester 14. 
Ipswtdi 13. 



MANDELA TROPHY ONE DAY MATCH 
New Zealand vs. PakMan 


Monday, in East London, Sooth Africa 
New Zealand Innings: 172 (all oul.473 overs) 
Pakistan Iteikws: 175-5 (384 oven) 

Result: Pakistan won by 3 wickets. 



IZVESTIA CUP 
Third Place 

Finland Z Sweden 1 (OT) 
Camotattoa 

France & Switzerland S 



World Cup Results 


MEN’S SLALOM 

Resells of T ende r** race at Lecty Austria, 
Mini skier, i i wili Y sod two beet time: 

1, Alberto Tomka. Italy (502364.50) 1 m to- 
uts, 4A73 seconds; 2. Thomas Sykora, Austria 
(SLOB-5114) 1 : 46:22; X Jure Kaelr. Slovenia 
(5B77-5153) 1:484 tt < MMwwf TrHecfier. 
Austria (5UM5J4) 1:4725; & Mchaelvon 
Grutnlgen. Switzerland (5U54477) 1:47.54. 

A Bernhard Gstretn. Austria <51.65-5403 ) 
1:4748; 7, Ole-ChrisHan Furvseth. Norway 
(5Z46-5S.15) ( :474? ; ft Andrea Zlnsii. Swltrer- 
kxid (5332-55-56) 1:4731: ft Sebastian Amlez. 
France (51655537) 1:47.94; 1ft KfetlLAndre 
Aomodt. Norway (£241-5548) 1:47.77. 

world Cup sworn Standing! (After three 
races): 1. Tomba. 300; 2. Trttscher, 190; 1 
Tomas FoBdoa Sweden, 140; 4, Sykora, 136; ft 
Van Gniei)lglen.ll4; 4. Fumseth.112; 7, Kosir, 
110; B, Aomodt, 91; 9. Mario Reiter, Austria, 
84; 10. Thomas Stangaeslnger, Austria. 71. 

OVERALL WORLD CUP STANDINGS (Af- 
ter Now events) : l,TombaJ50; L Von Guwn- 
Igen. 274; 3. Aomodt. 237; ft Patrick Ortlleb. 
Austria. 230; 5. Guenther Mader. Austria 220 ; 
6, Trltscher.lTO; 7, Kosir. 186; ft Luc AlPhand, 
France, 174; ft Josef Straw, Austria, 140; lft 
Sykora, 13ft 



BASEBALL 
American League 

BALTIMORE— Aeaulrad John DaSilva 


pHcher, tram Us Angeles tar John O'Oon- 
oahue. Pitcher. Named Steve Pastor ino gen- 
eral m anag er of High Desert. CL. 

BOSTON Mamed Ken Madia m u noger; 1 
Rico PtrtreaefH hltttna coorii aid A) Nipper .* 
pitching ebudt at Trenton, of ihe Eastern 
Leogue. 

MILWAUKEE— Named Lamar Johnson * 
batting coach. - 

SEATTLE— Signed Liils SetotafleMer.ftrt- * 
year contract. Named Terry Kennedy man- 
ager; Juan EkMDorger pitching coadi; 

Tam LeVasseur coach and RebNodtae tra)i>- . 
er at Riverside. CL- , 

National Lengoe - ' T 

COLORADO— Signed Wtttredo Martino and - 
Jase Mesa Pildwra and cartasReeariaouh 
Holder, to their team hi theTJomWcxx: Sum- Z 
mer League. 

FLORIDA— Sent Kettle Lawh. pitcher, out- . 
right to Charlotte. IL. - ’ # --- 

NEW YORK— Signed MBceBtri'bKfcrPttch- . . 
er. • '-7 .!r-v« 

= BASKETBALL . . . 

Maftoaal Basketball JUskMIr . 
PORTLAND— Waived Negate Knight. . . 
guard. Activated James Edwonta, center. V - 
tram the Iniined Hst. ' (_ 

FOOTBALL -* 1 ' 

nuiionni nw Hnn Lhnm. 

BUFFALO— Ptoosd Jim Kefty, quarter- . 
back, and Ed PhnoadefentivaSnetnaa on : 
Wind reserve. AcHvated Alex Van PeiL 
quarterback, and Tim Undata defensive llne- 
matv from the practice s quad. . 

NEW. ENGLAND— Placed Stove Hawkins, . . 
wide receiver, on In hired 'raeiu-ve. Activated ' '* 
Andre Bawdealliwbacker, from the practice ■- 

COLLEGE _ 

AKRON— Named Paul wtnton offensive .* 
ux x d ln o for and assistant head loaltnll . 
coach, and John Peterson defensive line 
cooch. 

CONCORDIA— Named Lnib Kern director - 
of athletics; Lou DeMella men's basketball . 
cooch; Joe Gatgano moms assktant basket-. ... 
bon cooch; and Joe Beranfl basebnll coctch. ' . 

GEORGIA SOUTHERN— Named Tony An- - 
draws men's as sistan t bosketboU coach. '■ ,i 
JAMES MADISON— Named Todd RaMgh 
assistant baseball coach. 

N1ANCHE5TER— Announced no rostona-. , 
flan of Goto Liston, football corah. 

MANSFIELD— Named Joe VlodeUa foot- 
ball coach. 

MEMPHIS — Fired Chuck Staborb football » 
coach. 

NORTHWESTERN, IOWA Homed Orv 
Otten football coach. ► 

OHIO UNIVERSITY— Named Jim. Grab* . 
football coach. 

OKLAHOMA STATE— Named Bab 51m- - 
more football coach. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 



'SATtlA ASKED HLW IF HED BEEN A 60CO33T 
.AND HE TOLD SANTA TO WIND HIS Ol/H SUSlNESS.'* 


ITH 4 TSQIXIMMP WOHBOXNE 
Is w MMInUlfllWaxpH 


UnDom mn feu Juicer 
n Wr la «ocn n», M torn 
tow adtary iwrts. 


TAGIN 

TTT3 


1 ARVEG 


iXj 

T! 


IRAHDLE 


nrc 

□□ 



□Qg 33 


a — ‘ y -q .— d — p-j Nat uanga m amedlmn b 
f I ] I tam Bs ww*L *9 MJ- 

- — 1~ - ■ ■ L__l gvege Dr M won canaan. 


I THOUGHT IT MI6HT BE NICE 
TO DROP A UTTLE NOTE TO 
SANTA CLAUS'S WIFE.. 


Jjjyvi j&iqrioiCL CHauA,, 



>c l c,uncA' , i 7 1 HAvr = A ^ 
SISMORA ? / THEORY THAT HE 

AlARRIED A NICE 
ITALIAN &RL-. / 



GARFIELD 


WO KNOW, GARFIELD.. - 


SANTA KNOWS WHETHER VOO'VE 
BEEN GrOOD OR BAP ALL ¥£AR 


POES HE GIVE POINTS FOR ) 

REINA- Ihir-rRATlATIWftO > 



FAVT& 7721 


BEETLE BAILEY 



(AnsMn kxnxia*) 

I JunbkK CHESS LCUSE PEPTIC GAIETY 
I Answer: PwrsunoBiedMdip»*li»*<d40n»» — 

ASttfasCHOSE 


Education Directory 

Every Tuesday 

Contact KinJberiy Guemsnd-Befroncourt 
Tel.: {33 1)46 3794 76 
Fax: {33 1)46 3793 70 
or your rsearesf IHT office 
or represenfafive 


DOONESBURY 



CALVIN AND HOBBES 


W f «N.' IM ^ | THWS ! 
WK'tS W 1 \ VMCE R 

P2FTJ5 T 

Cict^oroUR:/*! « to 


l’RVOOWWYaPE. 


OK. WKT ARE \ ( FISH. ) 


KHlKWEUm&fOUTQF-IUE 


lEoo-srow. 


U? WStVOR }/£*? 
DIMMER? 


ICHTFfOlp; 

SWKWELEEIS 

^CUT.' OUT. 1 






SU&iflSW 

FMflLTWhNfS 

vicnMf 


SaflPf 

1 



Q Iff 



/ 

5 



J3- 



i 


WIZARD of ID 



THE FAR SIDE BLONDIE 



“Vour dog had both maihm and opporturtfy, ma'am: 
He hated the cat end he's had training tn operat i ng 
heavy machinery. ... Your husband, are feel, was 
[usi In the wrong place at the wrong time." 














ains Uhl 

Nit 


Hs 

’ - 1 

• r — 


r ‘- - I. N 

: N‘.v 



■Slf'Ont 


i"«’ioDie 


^lirin^a 


. 4 rr 


m k Airport* 


^ruptinte 


— ■• - _• •■? i 


sports 

Players of the Year, 
Princes to King? 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1994 


Page 17 


are 1994 Players of 


L ondon — Heratd Tnbunt 

kind — explosive wZT^ on , e ** white, but they are two of a 
footed — andffawed! eSsed W|lh quickness, predominantly left- 

the Y^i? 1 nnsto Stoichkov are 1994 Players or 

2«m£b§£ ' ■» * . 

^^and a talent that tSns Hughes f*+%L 

An d, while soccer *c *% 

always stood oul “The mdi S du ^ 1 ^^ance has 

Ferenc Puskas, th* L D ®,8ame is for artists and artisans,” observed 
tfnrr^ <rf 1950s GaUopm S Major of the marvelous Hungarian 

canySe^^." he ** aie 11116 P 1 ®*® 5 - ^ anisans 

him^^^e'mnvSi^ 25 ^ a in excelsis. Others worked for 
PohaDK hera,!?!? 5 portly body to finish things with his left foot. 

Hungary was overrun bv Russians when his form 

FbothSr?Fji^I Skas ne ? CT rmished ^ No. 2 in France 
pit . Eur °P ean writers’ poll. 

Budapest J ti;^‘ Ve ^d kicking, full of wiles and opinions, in 
j care c r illustrates how environment, timing and 

opportunity determine recognition, 

N -„!2r lkov , an J d Amunike won their awards because Bulgaria and 
Nigeria reached the 1994 World Cup. 

* I firsL Bor ? on Christmas Day 1970, he recites the 

fnfW ' 119011 the field. A pity he does not think so 
arJi or ? SI 5n“ 1 g contracts. For, while his blistering speed 

and intuitive shooting helped Nigeria win the African Nations’ 
Cup m the spring and do well at the Worid Cup. he handled the 
ethical side of fame badly. 

JJW playing for Zamalek in Egypt But after he 
scored both Nigeria’s goals in the African Cup final against 
Zambia, temptation came at the double. 

His goals proved his poaching instinct from three meters, then 
ms awareness of team play. Nine Nigerian passes set up the 
chance before Amunike glided into space, controlled the ball with 
sc ? re ^ imperiously with the right from 12 meters. 
_ By World Cup time, be had signed contracts with two dubs — 
Duisburg in Germany and Sporting Lisbon in Portugal. 

The mess was pot exclusively his handiwork. Clemens Wester- 
h°f, then Nigeria’s coach, took it upon himself to represent 
Amunike — and, according to the player, Westerhof pressed him 
to sign for Duisburg or be dropped from the Worid Cup team. 

If true, it demeaned even the dubious work of two-timing agents. 
But A munik e signed, then regretted it when Sporting Lisbon made a 
better offer, and FIFA had to sort out the confusion. 

Amunike was as stubborn off the field as he is enthralling on it. 
He refused to set foot in Germany, and eventually Spurring 
Lisbon paid Duisburg $2 milt-inn compensation so that Amunike 
could flow again, which he is doing, with bom-again relish. 

Meanwhile, Stoichkov, 28, might at last be taming the tempest 
inside him. I fis talents were always there, often betrayed by spite 
and hot-headedness. As a youth, be ran 100 meters in 11.1 
seconds. He commanded the ball with a caress, stroked it with 
precision, bludgeoned it with power. 

He would shrug, his mother would suffer. This summer, with 
her son leading Bulgaria’s World Cup team with a gunslinger’s 
swagger, Penka Stoichkova was rushed suffered her third heart 
attack watching Hristo perform. 

She is 47. Stoichkov’s volatile game is harmful to her health. His 
wife, Marianna, and their two daughters may be inured to high 
motion, or compensated for the downside by life on the road with 
Bulgaria’s first SI milli on a year star. 

The mother has has lived longest with the fragile and frighten- 
ing talent and temper. While a teenager, Hristo was banned after a 
brawl between Sofia’s top dubs. 

His $3.5 million move to Barcelona followed in 1990 because 
the team’s coach, Johan Cruyff, wanted somebody to put nasti- 
ness into a team that was “too nice.” 

Stoichkov overdid it. He was banned for three months for 
stamping on a referee’s foot, banned time and again for 10 red 
cards in four seasons. 

Some bright philosopher suggested Stoichkov might be suffer- 
ing the turmoil of Bulgaria’s metamorphosis. He was raised under 
the Communist claim that its use of state funds and subsidies built 
the framework of soccer success. But when, in the Worid Cup, 
Bulgaria beat first Argentina, then Germany there was a new 
political system, a new daim. 

Stoichkov, whom Bulgarian newspapers have proposed as na- 
tional president, found a neutrality with his diplomatic accep- 
tance of the European Player of the Year trophy Monday in Paris. 

this hnnnr tnJnhtm Cmvff ”hesaid. “He took me to 






mm 


Ipi 


Players Offer 
New Proposal in 
Baseball Talks 


mm 


Compiled by Our Staff Faun Dupatdta 

WASHINGTON —Tuesday 


missioner. Bud Selig, has said it 
would be possible to move the 


marked a milestone of sorts for twice-delayed deadline for im- 
the major-league baseball poring the owners' salary cap 




Rad Bnmtiurmr/Aynct Fflmor-Prcuc 

Alberto Tomba of Italy celebrated his 28th birthday a day late on Tuesday, roaring to victory in Lech, Austria. 

Tomba Romps to 3d Slalom Victory 


strike: It was the 131st day. 
matching the length of the 1994 
season, which ended when play- 
ers walked out Aug 12. 

The players’ union staff held 
a meeting Tuesday, then met 
with the federal media lor, W. J. 
TJsery. A joint meeting of the 
uninn and baseball owners was 
scheduled later in the day. 

On Monday, the players pre- 
sented representatives of the 
team owners with a new con- 
tract proposal. Even so, the 
principals on both sides seemed 
to remain uncertain about 
whether this latest round of 
talks would bring sincere bar- 
gaining, or merely more postur- 
ing for possible litigation. 

Union officials, nine players 
and a scaled-down ownership 


system. If there is not progress, 
the owners’ executive council 
will declare an impasse in bar- 
gaining and impose the cap, 
leading to a court fight and the 
possible use of replacement 
players next spring. 

Last Thursday, the owners 
authorized the council to de- 
clare an impasse and impose the 
cap on Thursday or Friday. 

But the owners apparently 
have some fears about whether 
that move could withstand a 
legal challenge. A management 
source said that a labor attor- 
ney, Lewis Kaden, had told the 
owners that they could lose 
“hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars” in legal judgments. 

Sources said the Baltimore 
Orioles' majority owner, Peter 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LECH, Austria — Alberto Tomba of 
Italy won his third slalom of the season 
in rip-roaring style on Tuesday despite a 
fractured rib. 

Tomba, who turned 28 on Monday, 
was clearly a cut above the rest, romping 
home over two legs in a combined time 
of one minute 44.73 seconds, nearly a 
second and a half ahead of the pack. 

The Italian, who had painkdlmg injec- 
tions before the race, beat Thomas Sy- 
kora of Austria, who was second m 
1:4622. Slovenia’s Jure Kosir, who 
emerged as a top contender after coming 
second in a slalom in Lech two years ago, 
finished third in 1:46.50. 

The victory gave Tomba a dean sweep 
of the rialnms this season, and it was his 
fifth in a row after he won the final two of 


last season. He also stretched his lead in 
the overall standings over Michael von 
Gruenigen, who came in fifth on Tuesday. 

Tomba kept a firm bold on a slippery 
course while otters did and crashed out as 
snow fell. Thomas Fogdoe of Sweden, a 
winner here two years ago, skied off 
course in the second nm after docking the 
second-fastest time in the opening leg. 

“This is a great win for me, taking the 
conditions into account,” said Tomba 
after receiving a belated birthday cake 
On the finish Tine 

Conditions on the 180-meter Schlegd- 
kopf run were difficult A layer of artifi- 
cial snow and ice was covered overnight 
and throughout the day with constant 
snowfalls. 

A second slalom is scheduled at Lech 
on Wednesday before the men’s circuit 


moves to Alta Badia in Italy on Thurs- 
day for a giant slalom. 

Tomba returned to competition Tues- 
day after dropping out of a giant slalom 
Sunday at Vu dlsfere, France, following 
the first nm because of the rib injury 
sustained when he ran into a pole before 
the race in Sestriere^ Italy last week. 

Tomba still complained that his rib 
troubled him during the runs. He expects 
to feel the problem in Wednesday’s race. 

Tomba, who leads the overall World 
Cup standings with 350 points, moved 
within four of Pronin Zurbriggen for 
third place mi the career victory list. 
Ingemar Stenmark is the leader with 86. 

But Tomba said it was far too early to 
start thinking about clinching the overall 
Worid Cap title which has so far eluded 
him. (Reuters. AP) 


dating team met for about Aitggos. trfd his peas on nuns- 
eight houra here Monday. day Utat they were about to com- 
. nut ^nass financial suicade. 

The union presented a pro- ^ plans ^ chal1epg . 

“W imp® 556 declaration with 
similar to those in the ‘partner- the National Labor Relations 
shipand taxation-system plan and accuse management 

a complaint against the owners. 


m January in Florida. 

As with the union’s previous 
offer, this plan calls for each 
side to contribute at least $30 
million over the duration of the 
agreement to an “industry 
growth fund.’ 7 

If the sides move closer bn 
their tax ideas, the acting com- 


pursue collusion damages. 

The NLRB already has an- 
nounced its intention to issue a 
complaint against the owners 
for improperly withholding a 
$7.8 minio n payment to the 
players’ pension fund in Au- 
gust 

(AP, WP) 


Lendl Quits Tennis, 
Citing Back Ailment 




| INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

1 


Compiled by Ota Staff From Dispatches Lendl 

NEW YORK — Ivan Lendl 1985, *86 
who once ruled tennis with an nerup m 
iron will and booming fore- ’89, reac 
hand, retired from the sport on record-ty 
Tuesday because of a back afl- He m 
meat. round ol 

“I enjoyed playing the game. Op«t wl 
had a lot erf great times, and I wm) 
will miss it,” Lendl, 34, said in the Freni 
announcing his retirement. won thre 
Lendl, who held the world’s round la 
Na 1 ranking for a record 270 He skip] 
weeks, fell out of the top 10 last tons 
year for the first time since second-n 
1979. He is the tour’s all-tnne 
career prize money leader, hav- And, 
ing earned more than $20 mfl - naan to v 
lion, and was ranked No. 1 in ment cn 
the world right different years. 1980 thn 
“It is never easy,” he said trai an e 
when asked about the difficulty this year, 
of retiring from a sport he once 
dominated. “It is not something _ _ 


Lendl won the UJH Open in 
1985, *86 and *87, and was run- 
ncrup in 1982, ’83, ’84, ’88 and 
*89, reading the title match a 
record-tying right straight years. 

He made it to the fourth 
round of the 1994 Australian 
Open, where he lost to the even- 
tual winner, Pete Sampras. At 
the French Open, where he had 
won three titles, be was a first- 
round loser to Arnaud Boetsch. 
He skipped Wimbledon, then 
was forced to retire during his 
second-round match at the U.S. 
Open in September. 

And, after being the only 
man to win at least one touraar 
ment crown every year from 
1980 through 1993, he failed to 
win an event on the ATP Tour 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. ! 


BUSINESS 

MESSAGE 

CENTER 

Appears 
on Page 7 

PERSONALS ' 
MAY THE SACHS Heart of Jews be , 



If you enjoy rearing the 1HT 
when you travel, why not 
dso get it ot home ? 
Same-day delivery available 
m key Ui. cities. 

Call (J) 800 882 2884 

(hi NawYafc cgf 212 752 3890) 


“I dedicate this honor to Johan Cruyff,” he said. “He took me to when asked about the diff 
Barcelona." of retiring from a sport he 

Clever. Cruyff sat beside his player. Neither said how often dominated. “It is not some 
Cruyff had criticized or threatened the Bulgarian, or how Stoich- you deal with every day." 
kov m 1992 signed a four-year contract with Napoli even though “It’s a very difficult and sad 
he was tied to Barcelona until 1994. time to me and not the way I 

Cruvff dealt easily with Stoichkov. It was the month of a would have chosen to retire, 
European Champions’ Cup Final, either Stoichkov showed his Lendl added. “I am sure I’ll 
commitment to Barcelona or he could forget about appearing in miss the game I love. 

tWaroeof his life. Hc ^ one rc S rel 

Fxidof Napoli nonsense. But, it would seem, beginning of the never having won Wunbledon. 
between Stoichkov and Amunike. Gifted, flawed, and * But the native of Ostrava, 
r»l king of 1994. Czechoslovakia, now ranked 

^jatTve sridbetoe, is RomAria Not only did the Brazilian 54th by the ATP Tour, said he 
cud to Brazil, he scored two goals for every one made his decision after his doc- 
netted in the same Barcelona attack last season, tor told him his back would not 

South America, surely, will make get any better, 
of the Year. Then there will be three— black, white “After the Ui Open, 

S SLtmas to all men. had imore and more prebl 

prbfht^us Is the staff of "Pk Tima. JieSaKL 


(AP, Reuters) 


Jude, work* of miradei, pray (or u*. 
St Jude, hefcw of the hoprios, pray 
far n. Say n> prayer 9 tm a day. 
by the nrth day yot» prayer «■ be 
ansMiwl If hat never been fawn to 
fafl. PbUcoKn mol be pointed YJL 


If. WKKW Of mrooa, pray tar u*. .. m n^., m ,* 


MOVING 


■ Esherg Splits With Coach 

Stefan Edberg announced on 
Tuesday that he was splitting 
up with his coach of 1 1 years, 
Tony Pickard, Reuters repented 
from London. 

“We have had a great rela- 
tionship over the years, right 
from the time we met in 1983,” 
said Edbei^, winner erf 40 titles, 
including six Grand Slams. 

“This year, like every year, 
we’ve sat down and reviewed 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


VBNNA, AU5TBA. Tot 713-3374. 
Are yo« ud or wxrictK lonely or 
dapntraff Aie you dopmvia of *w 
dtU7 h hrfp* la toft abort i Phone 
BEFHB'OBtS « nd confidant*. 
Moorfn. WO sib - 1 pm and enety 
day 630 pm - 10 pm 


any better. the future, and I feel now it is 

After the UA Open, I’ve perhaps time for me to go on — 
had more and more problems," on my own,” the 28-year-old 
he said. Swede added. 


CROSSWORD 


0JNT£/tp£/W 

FOE A FREE ESTIMATE CAU 

PAHS (1) 39201400 


TOANSCO BELGIUM 

The Ivgatf car export company 
n Eurot* far the poo 20 yean. 
Al maba and modtb. 
Export tdowvgBlnfoii. 
SUpping ■ nartanoe 
European. African & U5. spea. 

Traraca, 51 VasiMcUpidr, 

Tdt 


HQMESMP. Smfl A immSmh ma, 
baaaage, an wHdwxfe. C<d CHaroe 
jSgffTo 81 18 81 {near Operal 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES " 


NEAR GENEVA . . 

ESIATE 

nil character, far nie or fa exchan^: 
far on apertnart m die frfaapcfity 
of Monaco. VAee to; Hauai Algia 
AMdwrante. 206 Route de 
Grenobto, 06287 NICE cedex 03. 
fed. N"7OT241Z1. who «a forward 


FRENCH RIVIERA 


UMTlMfS 

View an fcrt, rawdifag dipt*, SO 
nm, beam, prwole enhance, shower 
roan. bkheaTet fan 1 -46 37 01 10. 


MONTE CARLO 

On 3 lev els -7 ma n roora 
Cutuplealy roaonMod. coOnd au 
anAnafag, mutf Krtdbs TV, 
about 300 sqsu. Suing space + 
bdeonm, roof terrace, gotten. [Z 15# 

AAGEDI 

7/9, BddesMot&s. MC 96000 Monaco 
M3393 165939 fax 33-93 50 1942 


PARIS 

74 CHAMPS ELYS&S 
“CLABDGF* 

high dim ready to use flats 
My equipped and fuMKo, 


For Rent: by the day, week or more. 
Teh 1 Fax 1-4225MSB 


DEAL ACCOMMODATION 

REAflV TO MOVS4N 
Over 4803 apotments 


EMPLOYMENT 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


CABMT I7AVOCAIS 
Dro4 da Affaires el ockuifes mtemo- 
lionda - dwrdia, pour Tun de la 
mooes, secretive Hague anj^ad, 
audo. emenenoe VISSO 5 OM tou- 
haitee. A poiwoir urnnodfateaienL 


De Graourt Aasockies 
M 1-47 53 H 13 Fm 45 51 73 77 


Focfag HoMl OONCORDE LAFAYETTE 
Lmmnoic 2 roorra, TV, phono. 

No agency fee. F4,90D. 

Lease 1 north or mtxr, 

95, BU GowfanSL Cyr. Porn 17th. 
Teh (1) 43 59 56 72 


CAPITAIE • PASTfBS 

Hmdpided qndty apartmenfs, 

. til sizes. Rm and uifaurfaL. 

Tel 1-4A14 3211. Fax 1-4772 3096 


SWITZERLAND 


ACROSS ,0 j£^T 

i« Judd Hirach 

1 B« a party to aftcom 

a Breakfast strip « Jagged 


18 metangere 

it First place 
itSpry 

laFnitureftower 
ae Start of an old 
proverb 

aa Gran Paradiso, 
e.g. 

aaMUeast export 
aa Russian co-op 
X! Part 2 of ttw 
proverb 

aa Ancient city on 
the Gulf of 


a Archetype 
4 A Turner 
a Grin's partner 
• Fftsiortc 
Scottish county 
7 Hairdo 
aFroanerPark 


p4^ 


as Reduce 
34 Mural 1 st JosA 
as Irritable 
jr Give the eye 

41 Don Corieone 

42 Circa 

4jPart3ofthe • 

proverb 
47 Birchbaric 

oiOne maybe 

MghatS'.OO 

50 Plaines, IH- 

51 End of the 
proverb 

54 supra (see 

above) 

S7 Unde/sts” 0 

so Mr. Saarinen 
8i Graph start 
szficoleattender 
*s Leave shore 
S4^X7U° cra ^ 
a sPlaywri 0 M Riee 
aa Stepped 

down 

i Downed 
a Michael 

jSdcson album 


t At no time, to 
poets 
la Natural 
«i Nelson Eddy in 
‘Rose Marie" 
i* French avenue 
is Fortuneteller 
at "Goodbye, 
Columbus" 
author 

aaUon'aprida 
as Iowa university 
town 

tt Singer Lovett 
aaCommunlca- 
tions 

conglomerate 

ta Downs 

ao Took a chair 

M RossinPa 

"Count ‘ 

sa Spasm 
aa Ordinal ander 
Si Gram, case 
SB Firestone rival 

aaDarthVaoars 

son 

40 Vacation time* 

abroad 

41 Opinion 

sa Wise owl 

43 Garland 

44 Loggers' 
tourneys 

45 When some 
local news la 
•five" 

44 Render 
impotent 



ASrodExchor Start 10 
CHS027 Zurlcn 
The 815015. fiK 01S0Z 78 30 
TbL: OVBOZ 7B 10 
now TAX-FREE uiWd 
ALL LEADWQ UAKES 
S«m day ragWnlwn ponfcio, 
ranawabia up ta 5 years. 

Wb alto ragMK can *4h 
(wpawfl fcartgi tMw-taaJ Krtna. 


AUTO RENTALS 


DBS UtiM DBtGt AI7IO 
WfflCB43:FF515 
SPECIAL OFFER - 7 PAYS FF 1400 
PARS IH. (1)45 47 17 04 

ALTOS TAX FREE 


AUTO SERVICES 

new & w ad cun. ATX NV Taminddai ^ ™ 

40, 2930BraiKlnrt, Mr®. Flm CAR tNSUWMCE Af ONOE.. Groan 


□ mwmi 

wmmtism 





rnnuwiwn l ikw*. « pourvw mumtintmenL 
O MOVE4N Mktaut CV. ei preMm a SO* 

)0 apartmenis CAUHET IUCHMAN SWUTHL 31 bid 

enuftemb caused hUmdmrfm, 7500S Paris. (MM My| 


LEGAL SERVICES 

DIVORCE m 1 DAY. No irawL Write: 
fla. 377, Sudbwy. MA 01776 USA 
Tel: 50874434387, fax: 50874430183. 

LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ACCESS VOYAGES 

THE BEST FARES TO 
THE UNBED STATES 

end over 500 am dsshnatiars worid. 
rode on 40 diffcrert ichadufad corricn. 

Tri PAHS M0 13 02 02 or 42 21 46 94 
{fate 1-42 21 44 20 
MWTR- 3615 ACCESSVOTAG5 
TafcLYON 78 63 © 77 or 72 56 15 95 

BOOK NOW by phona wrth cndl cord 
Geroanmef* Ucenaa 17511 J 

WORD AVIATION ■ SOfSUfD 
FUGH15 Id hanesv. Dcanomy al 
fawd hrn, teJ ffT Pork n»«513l3 


Jtcmlh^^feSribunc 

PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Place your Ad quddy and easily, contact your 
nearest IHT office or represenlatiye with your text. 
You will be informed of ihe cost nvnec&cridy, and 
once paymmt is made your ad' wil appear wttin 
48 hotrts. 7- ] major Credit Cards Accepted 




BOATS/YACHTS 




© New York Tmee/EdSlad by Will Shorts. 


Take 31s 
mob 1959. 


ESCORTS A GUIDES 


NTBtNAIlONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

Hood offiro fa Now Yorit 
330 W 56 Si NVC 10019 

212-765-7896 

MAJOI OB»r CAMS AND 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 




tNIERNAIKNALBCOOS 

r,|,I , U/hrMiBM 
jfllrlj - wonmwaf 

H lt&SSJm Mem Tab, USA 
■ Mqpbr OadT Gvdi Accepted 


NATASHA MAMN 

LONDON BCOtr sunna 
071 351 1013 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


AGBCE CHAMP5 B.YSSS 

Mdofcfc in fmohod liaiIkhRs, 
raadem «ofo 3 aiorth* cmd more. 

Tah fl] 42 25 32 25 

Fox (1)45 63 37 09 


MADISONS 

IONDON PASS fam Agaacy 

UK 071 266 0586 


1OHD0N BRAZUAN Escort 

Senrioa 071 724 5597/91 - crocB sards 


mm 


GBNUNr. Ausnu a cboul 

HJNOH: Fionldurt. 

TtLfim 72 $7 55. 

Foe JD6^ 72 73 IQ 

SWmEKAND: My, 
TaLimi)728»21. 

Fox PQ1) 728 30 91. 

UNDB) KMGDOM: landon, 

a,™* 2 

Foe (071 1 240 2254. 


LONDON'S NO. 1 ESCORT 

3 Shm44n» SC London Wl 
AGBCT 071 2S« 0090 


G8B7A * AIUANCE 
Escort Servica A Trovrt. AtaWa 
DU Geneva 022/311 07 i 


•• ZUtiQi •• VKXET 

Escort Service. Cradl dudi aazpSed. 

Tat 07 / 63 83 31 


M.:|B52) 92221188. 
Wae 61170 MHX. 
Fo« (B52) 92221 190. 
SMC4KME: 

U: 223 6478. 

Foe |651 224 15 66. 

- Tefac M749 IHTSN. 


Solution to Puode ol Dee. 20 London mbs geneva zubkh 

EmrtAsancy Crodti Grok Wakaroa 


<7 Wndrt service 
ae stage c o mm e n t 

■a Business exec 
Wfltiam 

as Cheerleader's 
routine 
m Watch part 
ss Hatching post? 
aa John Wayne's 
Lobo" 

•P Used 


SHBO QDHIZl □□□□Q 
tusna asms azimeja 
mnnnuasasa anaaca 
Eianancg □□□□ aaa 
Sana nataaniaa 
aiDHOsaaEJ anna 
□sa assas aaaas. 
□ass sassa saas. 
□□□□□ anaas aaa: 

□□sa □□□□□□aai 
saasaaa □□□□ 
smB □□□□ aansaai 
oosoa ssuHnaaaDa! 
□□□□□ aciQH □□□□! 
□□□□a aaaa ss^al 


UK 071 589 5237 


MAXB1A 

LONDON 

Lonfan VfcasiD Esccrt Sana 

UK 071 591 0458 


oesuBCoiraanncL 

5,fc ^Sfa"iilli?" swl 


TO OUR REAPERS 
IN HOLLAND 

It's never been easier 
to subscribe 
and save 
Just call today 
02503-24024 






Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1994 


OBSERVER 

Building Up Newt 


The New Political Weather Vane: The Best-Seller List 


By Russell Baker 


XTEW YORK — Poor Newt 
IN Gingrich- Washington js 
giving him the buildup. It's un- 
precedented for a mere con- 
gressman to get the buildup. 
Until now, the buildup has al- 
ways been reserved for presi- 
dents. 

“We build ’em up because irs 
so much fun to knock ’ran 
down," as nobody ever says in 
Washington. It’s a sly htde aty. 
They don’t talk plain there. 

A lot of the sport lies in not 
letting the poor guy know 
what's been done to nun until 
he reads it in the newspapers. 

Remember that. Newt Ging- 
rich, you surpassingly brilliant 
philosopher and master of poli- 
tics whose excellence in every- 
thing from bowling, both ten- 
pins and duckpins, to the 
conjugation of irregular Persian 
verbs has not been seen in 
Washington since the last mug 
who got the buildup. 

This, come to think of it, was 
Bill Clinton. 

What a magnificent presi- 
dent-elect he was just two years 
ago! Had there ever been a 
president-elect with such an ex- 
tensive knowledge of every- 
thing governmental, depart- 
mental, elemental, supple- 
mental, incidental, tempera- 
mental, sentimental, endo- 
rfi>ntai and fundamental? 

No president-elect can es- 
cape the buildup, even though 
he’s been around long enough 
to know what they’re building 
him up for. 

Remember Jetty Ford be- 
coming president even as heli- 
coptered Nixon rose from the 
White House lawn? Ford had 
been in Washington forever, 
had seen ’em built up, seen ’em 
knocked down, but even be 
couldn’t stop the buildup artists 
from doing it to him. 

What a superb president he 
was, this amazing Ford. He 
even made his own toast! The 
old-timers said Jefferson was 


the only president who could do 
it all — write a declaration, de- 
sign a university, invent a polid- 
caiparty — but could Jefferson 
make his own toast? 

After that, Jimmy Carter. 
Carried his own suitcase! Made 
the bed after a superb night’s 
sleep! Mister Fantastico! 


By David Streitfeld 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — You don’t 
need a weatherman to tell you 
which way the wind is blowing. A 
copy of the best-seller list will do just 
fine. Take “Guns, Crime, and Free- 
dom," brought out by Regnery Pub- 
lishing. Once you know the book was 
written by Wayne LaPierre, the head 
of the National Rifle Association, 
you can easily guess its message. 
(Sample sentence: “Clearly, the War- 
saw ghetto stands in history as a 
shining example of the dangers of 
gun controL") 

What no one reckoned on was the 
message’s popularity. Regnery started 
with around 20,000 copies last sum- 
mer and now has 10 times that num- 
ber in prim. The biggest success in the 
publisher’s 47-year history, “Guns" 
recently spent two weeks on The New 
York Tunes best-seller list — an un- 
usual place to find such a partisan 
look at such a hot-button issue. Har- 
perCollins just bought paperback 
rig hts for a significant six-figure sum. 

“This is about freedom. Not crime, 
not hunting, not recreation. Free- 
dom. And people don’t want to lose 
it," declares LaPierre. He adds that 
“people are totally fed up with the 
jmsreporting of this issue in the na- 
tional media." 

His hand is sore. He’s done 82 
book-signings in the past few 
months, all over the country with the 
exception of a few gun-control 
strongholds like the District of Co- 
lumbia and New York City. 

One man's truth, of course, is an- 
other fellow’s propaganda, but the 
prevalence of conservative/ li bertar- 
ian/ right-wing/ Republican truth on 
the best-seller list these days is over- 
whelming. Meanwhile, Democratic 
propaganda is about as fashionable 


The Gingrich buildup fol- 
lows the classic pattern. After 
years of being widely regarded 
as a bit of a nit, he astonished 
all humanity, including most 
likely himself, by winning the 
lottery. 

Becoming speaker of the 
House is truly a big deal, but 
Washington has never before 
laid on a buildup for a speaker. 
□ 

The explanation for the 
Gingrich buildup is obvious 
enough. The indispensable 
president has been knocked 
down too fast. But meanwhile, 
what about the next two years? 
Where’s the story? No use con- 
tinuing- the Clinton knock- 
down. 

So Gingrich takes the fall It’s 
as though everybody had said 
simultaneously, “[jet’s make 
Gingrich it!” Since the election 
he’s been lathered in the fatu- 
ous praise of columnists and 
interrogated with the aggressive 
sincerity of our gravest corre- 
spondents about matters on 
which they usually examine 
only presidents. 

Gingrich the man is analyzed 
with a thoroughness that only 
presidents must normally en- 
dure. His divorce from his ail- 
ing wife, his tastes in literature, 
the hitherto unappreciated acu- 
ity of his philosophical and the- 
oretical thought, his college-lad 
urge to be a famous writer of 
raunchy best-selling fic- 
tion . . . 

Even without Clinton, the 
story can go on. Come on, ev- 
erybody, let’s do a Clinton on 
good old Newt! You too. Rush. 
Cheerleading is for wimps. 

New York Times Service 


I r—sr — — . 

as a panhandler at a picnic. 

“For some reason, liberals are no 
longer able to talk about the world 
around us in a way that really gets 
people in their guts," says John Ster- 
ling, editor in chief at Houghton 
Mifflin. “But conservatives suie can. 
It’s happening in Washington in 
Congress, and it’s happening nation- 
ally on the best-seller lists." 

Sterling successfully published one 
of the last unabashedly liberal books. 


Al Gore’s “Earth in the Balance." 
“Was that only in 19927” he asks. It 
yftms like a decade ago.” 

The tide has turned, the editor 
says. “If you were a publisher who 
just wanted to pick winners, you’d 
say. Let's sign up people who have 
great TV programs — a reference to 
the huge success of books by comics 
Tim Aden, Paul Reiser and Jerry 
Seinfeld — “and conservatives who 
have terrific media profiles.” 

And if you got a conservative with 
a terrific media profile and a popular 
radio and TV program, you could 
clean up. Which is exactly what Si- 
mon and Schuster has done with 
Rush Limbaugh- 

Says Adam Bellow, editorial direc- 
tor of the Free Press: "The liberal 
monopoly on public debate has 
weakened. Tm always being asked, 
I What manipulative magic did you 

use to create this audience for conser- 
vative books?’ But the audience has 
always been there. It’s just that be- 
fore, conservative ideas were walled 
off in a ghetto.” 

Consider some further evidence: 
William Bennett’s “Book of Virtues,” 
a compendium of moralizing fables, 
has been on The New York Times list 
for nearly a year. Dan Quayle’s book 
was a bigger bit than anticipated. 
Richard Nixon’s last book spent four 
Hmps longer on the list than Jimmy 
Carter’s. Barbara Bush has racked up 
14 weeks and counting for her latest, 
vs. 0 and falling for Rosalynn Carter. 
The massive popularity of the No. 1 
fiction best-seller “Politically Cor- 
rect Bedtime Stories” underlines the 

ness From^beral mantra to joke. 
Then, of course, there’s the chart- 
topping nonfiction offering by Pope 
John Paul II — not exactly anyone's 
idea of a leftist 

Still not convinced? Check out the 
fate of Mr. Anti-Family Values him- 
self, Marion Brando. His $5 million, 
heavily hyped, yeara-in-the-making 
autobiography arrived with a clunk in 
September. Even slashing the price SO 


ifias 


mm 




(V 


vC\ % 


Nwdnr/Udu/IHT 


Curve,” Charles Murray and Rich- 
ard Hermstcm’s 845-page opus on 
“intelligence and class structure in 
American life." Touted on its dust 
jacket as “cer tain to ignite an explo- 
sive controversy," the book was at- 
tacked by most of the mainstream 
media as an ill-mannered, ill-con- 
ceived, statistically flawed, crypto- 
racist manifesto. There are now 
400,000 copies in print, the biggest 
success in the Free Press’s five de- 
cades. (Sample sentence: “The aver- 
age validity in the meta-analysis of 
the GATB studies was .45.”) Bellow 
says: “All you really need to get a 
book going — at least, a conservative 
book — is for the journalistic estab- 
lishment to denounce it." 

If you talk to the mavens of the 


such assertions. “I don’t deny that 
people bought the book because it 
was controversial, and I don’t even 


deny that some people bought the 
book just because they agreed with 
what they thought was in it, but a 
sizable number bought it because 
they wanted to make up their own 
minds.” Bellow himself is the best 


minds.” Bellow himself is the best 
proof of the conservative ascension 
m publishing: He’s the hottest editor 
in New York. 

“Strange Justice,” the book on 


“Strange Jus nee, me ooott on 
Cl arenceihomas and Anita H21 by 


Jane Mayer and Jill Abramson, was 
released in early November in a fire- 
burst of publicity. With 1 IS, OCX) 


unread best-seller, following in the 

* c TT a* A 


percent hasn't helped resuscitate it. 
No one wants to hear Brando's opin- 


footsteps of Stephen Hawking’s “A 
Brief History of Time,” Allan 
Bloom's “The Closing of the Ameri- 
can Mind," Paul Kennedy’s “Rise 
and Fall of the Great Powers” and 
the novels of Umberto Eco. 

Adam Bellow, the 37-year-old son 
of Nobel laureate Saul Bellow, rejects 


burst of publicity. With 115,000 
copies in print, it spent three weeks 
on the best-seller list As Houghton 
Mifflin’s Sterling, the book’s editor, 
points out, this is an achievement in 
itself. “It’s very hard to get any book 
of substance onto the best-seller list.” 


Sterling successfully published 
of the last unabashedly liberal bo 


No one wants to hear Brando's opin- 
ions about the fate of the Indians. No 
one wants to read Peter Manso's 
weighty biography of him either. 

Instead, they want “The Bell 


Because the book concludes that 
Anita H21 was telling the truth about 
Clarence Thomas, it’s perceived as 
“liberal.” That’s opposed to the 
“conservative” approach of David 
Brock, who penned “The Real Anita 
Hill” 18 months ago. Brock’s book, 


which attacked Hill and supported 
Thomas, was an unexpected success. 
If “Strange Justice” is lucky and sells 
70 percent of its print-run, the net 
sale will be about 80,000 copies - 
significantly under the 115,000 
aefueved by “The Rea] Anita Hill" 

As it happens, “The Real Aorta 
HOI” was edited by Bellow. And it, 
like “The Bell Curve," was attacked 
on publication, which as usual only 
helped Once again, some people 
rcad it to see what all the noise was 
about, while for others it offered a 
point of view they found sympathetic 
_ ^ which hadn’t received much 
air time by the mainstream media. 

“Strange Justice," in BeJJow’s view, 
suffered™ the marketplace from the 
fact that “it just confirms ruling preju- 
dices. People don’t really need it.” 
After “Strange Justice” received its 
generally approving nods in the me- 
rifcT in other words, there was nothing 
left to say and nowhere for it to go. 

Last spring. Grown Publishers ran 
ads for “Lethal Passage: How the 
Travels of a Single Handgun Expose 
the Roots of America’s Gun Crisis ” 
National Rifle Association members 
were offered a $2 rebate if they sent 
in the receipt for the book and a copy 
of their membership card The num- 
ber of responses, says the publicist 
Andrew Martin, was “fewer than 
10 .” 

“That showed us that no NRA 
members were interested in looking 
at a book that took careful aim at the 
business of guns in America." says 
Martin. (Either that, he concedes, “or 
they didn’t need $2.”) 

“Lethal Passage,” by Erik Larson, 
a Wall Street Journal repeater, got 
good reviews and- some attention 
during the crime ball debate, but it 
sold only modestly. “People who 
hate guns don’t want to read about 
thembecause they know they already 
hate them,” says Larson. “They’re 
delighted a book Eke mine; a critical 
book, came out, but they don’t really 
feel they have to go out and read it. 
Whereas one thing that characterizes 


. Hiii 


jfiffhoiri 
■fli.-t in A« * 


& 1,1 


Cat 


rv 


m 

r-.*# 




people who love guns is that they 
love to read about thernl Especially 
after the last few years, they need to 
read something that reinforces their 
belief that owning a gun doesn’t 
malm you a homicidal maniac ” 




WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Mganra 

AnMMun 

Ankara 


Corn Dei Sol 

Diem 

EOrttagn 


Hotting 
ManBui 
Las Patras 

Lisbon 

London 

Undid 

Mean 

Moscow 

Momcn 


Sl Rmnbuig 
SwcBiokn 
Stnwbouig 
Talm 


Today 
Wo*> LOW 
OF C/F 
10*1 8/40 

*139 1/34 

409 -lOI 
13*5 8 *’40 

1203 8/48 

3/37 1/3* 

2/35 -2/29 
8/43 2 05 

4/30 3/37 
3/37 -1/31 
10*1 0/40 

BUS 3/37 
7/44 409 

7 M 4 3 Q 7 

307 0/32 

307 002 

2os sea 

9/40 7M4 

24/75 18151 
13/95 8M8 
7M4 205 
8/48 409 
307 002 
■4/25 -7/20 
104 -zia 
10/50 307 
DOS -4/25 
1162 10/50 
4 OB 205 
104 -2/28 
6 '41 4139 
10*0 409 
■3/27 4102 
1/3* *307 
205 -209 
205 -4/25 
0*13 307 

209 002 

104 -aw 
1/34 -2/ZB 


Tomorrow 
W High Low W 
CIF OF 
C 1702 10/50 S 
DC 0/43 206 • 


cn s/41 -1/31 r 
1 13/56 9/40 Ml 


12/53 409 r 

4/36 -lOI r 


pc 307 -1/31 pc 
(It 7/44 206 PC 


I 400 2/35 r 
PC 409 1 / 3 * a 

PC 1702 9/40 ■ 

c 10/50 S /*1 on 


pc 0 / 4 fi 8/43 a 

an 8/43 206 ah 



on 4/39 104 pc 

PC 205 -lot *1 


'»• 

JaSraun 


I unwunoiuray 
Co« 


UrwaosonMBy 

Hoi 


in 205 -6/24 pc 
nh 10150 8/43 r 
B 24/75 1702 1 
t 1407 IQ/50 pc 
9b 1000 *08 4 

■h 10/50 307 r 

sn 307 -ioi an 
B -405 -7/20 an 
an 1/34 o/29 sr 
pc 8 M6 104 ab 


North America 

A storm will dump rain on 
Atlanta lata ihta weak, ana 


rabis, along with gusty east 
winds, wilt move Into wash- 


C 002 * 2/29 pc 
« 11/52 8/43 r 

sb 6/43 104 pc 


winds, win move Into Wash- 
ington. D.C.. and Philadel- 
phia late Friday or Saturday. 
Vary mild weather lor the 
season will happen late this 
week from Calgary to Mon- 
treal and Bosion. 


Europe 

Rather mHd late this week m 
Glasgow and Edinburgh, 
while London could have 
loggy mornings. A cot**) of 
ramy periods are expected 
Thursday through Saturday 
In Rome. Paris to Brussels to 
Berlin will have tranquil 
weather late this week with 
some sunshine each day 


Heins will fall Thursday m 
Manila a6 Typhoon Axel 


Manila as Typhoon Axel 
passes to tho south: heavi- 
est ralna and strangest 
winds wIR IBwIy tnun Manila, 
though. Tokyo and Osaka 
w# have sunshine Thursday 
Into Friday, then showers 


Saturday. Turning cold by 
Saturday in Beijing and 
Seoul. 


on 1/34 -a/27 an 
T 4/38 -1/31 |b 


on 8/46 2/36 r 
«n - 4/25 - 7/20 sn 
PC 2/35 - 2/29 s 
e 2/36 - 2/28 Bn 
sn 1/34 -4125 DC 
r 8/43 2/35 r 

sn 2/39 -l/ 3 l sn 
sn 1/34 * 2/29 sn 
C 104 - 2/29 sn 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Oceania 

Auddond 


Today Tomorrow 

High La* * Hign Low w 
OF OP OF GIF 

3 auu 17*2 12,63 pc 19/88 13/55 B 

Cato ia <84 B /48 s ZZ /71 12 /B 3 l 

Damascus 11/62 SOI pc 10*1 6 M 3 ■ 

jorwtam 13/55 7/44 po 10*1 B /48 s 

turn 20/79 6/41 b 29*4 10/50 s 

Riyadh 19/90 8/48 1 10*4 11/62 pc 


Today T ra nanrnw 

High Low W High Low W 
OF GIF OF OP 

BuSfKM AJras 29*4 17*2 pc 32*9 21/70 ■ 

Caracn 29*4 21/70 pc 29*4 20*8 pc 

LkM 2373 18*4 ■ 23/73 18*4 PC 

MwfcoOty 22/71 6/48 PC 23/73 TM 4 pc 

Ho doJwwta 27*0 22 /n pc 27 /BO 22/71 pc 

Santiago 20/79 13*6 • 30*6 14/57 pc 


. 24/75 15*0 lb 22/71 1*167 PC 
27/90 20*6 pc 27*0 Hi 70 pc 


Lagand: Branny. pc-parVy cloudy, frctaudy. ah-ehowwa. Vfiundarswirw, r-ram. at- enow Hurries, 
srwmon. Mce. w-weathor. AH maps, forooMts and data pravfdod by Accu-Waottwr, Inc. «J 1994 


Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow 


High 

Low 

W 

Mgh 

Law W 


cm 

CJF 


OF 

OF 

BBngkak 

29*4 

19*8 

PC 

29*4 

22/71 sn 

BeSmg 

8«*3 

■3/27 

1 

7/44 

-2/29 S 

HongKeng 

21/70 

15*1 

PC 

21/70 

17*2 sn 

MmU 

20*4 

23.73 

in 

30*6 

24(75 r 

NewDett 

24/75 

B/48 

g 

26/79 

9(46 i 

Sni/ 

7*4 

-5.24 

4 

(0.30 

-4-2S * 

Sriangnai 

BUB 

1<3C 

■ 

13156 

5(41 a 

9krgi«arB 

31*6 

24/73 

bh 

29*4 

24/75 PC 

Ttttt 

21/70 

15/58 

c 

22/71 

17.82 ah 

Tokyo 

11*2 

1/34 

t 

13/SS 

3*7 PC 

Africa 

A)0on 

14*7 

11 <52 

pc 

15*9 

10/50 1 

Craw Town 

26/79 

13*6 

a 

17*2 

9/48 Bfl 

CatjUBnca 

19*0 

7/44 

t 

19(88 

B/40 B 

Horara 

20*8 

8/43 

PC 

22/71 

0/48 B 

Logos 

31*8 

24/75 

B 

32*9 

25/77 ■ 

Namtx 

20*8 

11/52 

Htl 

21/70 

1283 l 

Tunis 

13*5 

e/«3 

PC 

1203 

6MJ r 

North America 

Aretamgo 

•8/IB 

-14/7 

e 

a/IB 

•19.--2 pc 

MkMB 

13/55 

BM 

c 

13*5 

4/39 r 

Bosun 

10/50 

6(41 

B 

12<S 

3/37 S 

CMUgo 

7/44 

2/35 

C 

8/40 

307 pc 

Dnnnv 

12/53 

7(20 

B 

10/50 

■fSB PC 

Dnvot 

10*0 

2/35 

B 

9/48 

3(37 C 

HonoUki 

29*2 

2triO 

PC 

27*0 

20*8 pc 

HuiDtan 

20*8 

11*2 

c 

10*4 

0/48 pc 

un AngoWB 

18*4 

9/48 

sh 

23/73 

0(46 C 

Miranl 

28/79 

21/70 

id 

26/79 

16*1 PC 

WralaapNB 

3/37 

2/36 

Bn 

0/43 

0/32 pc 

MorarunJ 

0/43 

-2/29 

pc 

0/43 

-4(25 pc 

Naiwui 

29/77 

21/70 

EH 

27*0 

21/70 : 

New Von 

11*2 

6/41 

S 

11*2 

5/41 FC 

PTWHtt 

22/71 

11*2 

1 

70*0 

10*0 pc 

San Fran. 

12*3 

5/41 

C 

14*7 

B/48 pc 

Seems 

BM8 

3/37 

pc 

b«b 

5/41 sn 

Toronto 

8M8 

1/34 

DO 

7444 

1*4 pc 

Waattpgan 

12*3 

3/37 

« 

12*3 

3 07 PC 


T HE conductor Vladimir Ashkenazy has 
abruptly quit as music director of Brit- 


X abruptly quit as music director of Brit- 
ain’s Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, claim- 
ing that the orchestra has negotiated behind 
his back to replace him, Ashkenazy told The 


Independent newspaper that he was ap- 
proached last week by Paul Findlay, the 
orchestra’s chief executive, who said he had 
made an offer to Damele Gatti to succeed 
him. Ashkenazy, who has been music direc- 
tor since 1987, said he instructed his agent 


in London the next day to tell Findlaythat 
he could no longer work with the RPO. “I 


he could no longer work with the RPO. “I 
really don’t understand why they did this,” 
Ashkenazy said in Berlin. “It would have 
been so simple just to keep me informed." 
An orchestra spokesman said, “1 am not 
aware he has left Discussion is going on 
about the future of the musk director." 

□ 

The Moscow poet, singer and author 
Bulat Okudzhava has been awarded the 
£10,000 ($15,000) Booker Prize for Rus- 
sian literature, an offshoot of Britain’s 
Booker Prize, for his largely autobiograph- 
ical book “Abolished Theater.” 

D 



ceived the honor from Cardinal Jean-Mark 
Lustiger in Paris. Levine met Pope John 
Paul II after a ground-breaking trip to Po- 
land in 1987, when he was a guest conductor 
with the orchestra. 

□ 


Roman Polanski is suing ftris Match few 
150,000 francs ($27,000)m damages over ^ A 
photosit published of him and his wife. The 
director and his wife, the actress Emman- 
uefle SeJgner, claim Paris Match used the 
photos without their consent. 

□ 


Rodney Dangevfield gets no respect from 
the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 
Sciences. The academy won’t let the come- 
dian be a member because he lacks "enough 
of the kind of roles that allow a performer to 
demonstrate the mastery of the craft” 
Roddy McDowaH, chairman of the Actors 
Brandi executive committee, wrote. 


tUdunl MtteahaD/Caincta Pits 

Ashkenazy quits Royal Philharmonic. 


The American conductor Gilbert Levine an Order of St Gregory the Great Levine, 
was awarded a high papal honor, becoming the artistic director and principal conductor 
only the fourth Jew to receive the Equestri- of the Krakow Philharmonic Orchestra, re- 


Princess Diana will visit Japan as a chari- 
ty ambassador in early February, Bucking- 
ham Palace announced Tuesday. The trip 
will be her first major overseas tour since 
she announced she was cutting back on 
public engagements more than a year ago. 


*oi lartei 








Your stomach’s growling 


Mother Nature s calling. 


Your flight's boarding. 


Plenty of time to make; say. ^ 


ten calls. 





\i- With AT&T USADirect^ ami 

* World Connect * Service, you can make 


multiple calls without redialing 
your card or access number. 


You’re in a hurry So we’ll he brief. AT&T L'SAPirea ;uul 


World Connect Service gets >ou fast, clear connections 


back to the United Stales or to any nf over !'.«? other 


^'ans P| a 


countries. .Also, an easier way to make multiple calls 


Up to 10 in a row. Just dial the AT&T Access Number 


below for the country you’re calling from. Your call 


will go through in seconds. Then, instead of hanging 
up after each call, busy signal or unanswered call, 
simply press the # button. Now you're ready to make 
the next call. In short, make the most of your limited 
time. Spend less time dialing. .And more time talkm* 

1 l Cl 


AUSTRALIA 

CHINA, 

HONGKONG 

INDIA* 

INDONESIA* 

JAWIN'. 

KOREA 

MACAO 

MALAYSIA' 


ICIFIG 

rffVY ZEALAND 

000-911 

AlISnUA'i” 

D22-90S-011 

HUNGARY* 

0O> 808-01111 

NORWAY 

300-108-11 

MIDDLE EAST 

AMERICAS 

PANAMA.. 

. IBS 



1BOO-081-OI1 

PHILIPPINES' 

IB-11 

oasiur . 

.0-800-1 MHD 

ICELAND*. 

988-801 

POLAND! •*. 

Bv01D-488-0111 

BAHRAIN 

8«i-00l 

ARGENTUM* 

uiti-iwiou-im 

HERU*. 

. 191 

TrucWorhi ■ Connections 

"■ 

10811 

flUSSlA-MMSCOW] 155-58*2 

BULGAHIA .... 

00-1BOO-0010 

BtELANO 

1- BOB-568- BOD 

PORTUGAL' 

. 05017-1-281 

CYPHUS- 

OW-WIO 

MJLfclA*. 

ii 9XJ0 III’ 

VBIEZUELA-. 

80-011-120 


600-1111 

SAIPAN* 

235-2872 

GRIWTIV* 

9M8-0011 

ITALY* 

172-1011 

HOMAMA. 

81- 880*4288 

aYFT-(CAnO)' 

. 510*0200 

BRAZIL 

008-8010 

AFRICA * 



800-117 

SINGAPORE 

800-01 1 Ml I 

EZBMNEnsUC 

M-42S-MHBJ 

LIECHTENSTEIN* 

. 16B-B0-11 

SLOVAK BB* 

00-428-00101 

ISRAa. 

177*100*2727 

CANADA 

i-Aiu-1. 

GABON' 

OK-WT 



001-801-10 

SRI LANKA 

430-430 

DENMARK* 

6001-0010 

LITHUANIA* 

. . 80196 

SPAIN. 

9049-00*11 

MJWAIT . 

300-raa 

CHILE. 

oa-:-«i2 

GAMBIA'. . 

.. . 00111 


^ "'V'- 

0039-111 

raiWAH- 

ooao-iozu-o 

RNLAND' 

HH-1H-10 

LUXEMBOURG 

.. . 0-806-0111 

SWEDEN’ 

020-795-011 

LEBANON (BEIRUT]- 426-801 

COLOMBIA 

980-11-0010 

IVORY COAST' 

00-111-11 



009-11 

1HAILATJG* 

.U0IW)1-t1I1 

FRANCE ' 

103-0011 

MALTA 

0800-890-110 

SWITZERLAND- 

155-00-11 

SAUDI ARABIA 

1-.H0- 10 

EL SALVADOR 1 . 

. 190 

kfcWrfii 

.0600-10 



.0800-111 

EUROPE 

GERMANY 

. 0130-0010 

MONACO*. . 

. . 18J-0011 

UKRAINE’. 

8C100-11 

TURKEY* 

08-800-12277 

HONDURAS*.. 

123 

LIBERIA 

797-797 

ATsT 


800-0011 

ARMENIA' 

8014111 

GREECE* 

00-800-1311 

NETHERLANDS' 

86-022-9111 

U.K. 

0500-80*0011 

U ARAB EMIRATES- 

800-121 

HixlCO*--; 

% IO.i • 1C ■l.-JH 

South Africa 

0-880-89-0123 

• ■' > 


Tj 

s* 


S'tJj 

'£?♦ 7)| 


li- fli / im- mlM I'jri Inlnis ill h! acti»> uiyiii. r» ,t.l i-.ruMKi.f «t>ki iih-f itialiM;il* ati-v. iiirniluT 
VNTVttUKiniktl ■.** '*>.vl.iMt li. Ml l«nl iMIllll. .-miilr I'.«.ii4n CjIIsir imM/V tin- 1 > * 'dirt tilht » h, |l. 1 > ,.V» Ht'l/rld MMllT I'WiMM -JlSUXinr tf- •:ll*n- h*.,! .« d-OMUi | AW I.MPHW iraAr .. n I ■.■> h 5-! J, 1U ■|-,d,U 1 „| 1 „n- .I,./.,) I CJhl ».* .li N- IM . 

>tii«l I-Jin. .114/1 III UN .«UN,V Ib-n.( Mn -.4h Ii.hh i,rr. |i|Mr li*)* flro* ^ V* '"•** “■"«*« ** •:* •Iff/f’i x l«*;i puHtf ***‘-4 1»: firm M /rrt- Ma/>I wU S.i\ c/ll'.* M».i P i«»- plpii* ,,Im« »nit«l •./.*/■,•• -I *■!„•* .. rfrf-h .|„ «.M «,irid Consnl - voiu WIIiiu-.m: ,• ,K , ' f* l.r. 

i- ’“*• -/l.“h »r,-, 


* rr ‘*K I 


_ ----- - a 




jJi u* r *5uC